Subseries 1.2
Mary Wadley Raoul papers, 1865-1936
Boxes 3-4

Biographical Note

The daughter of Georgia railroad executive, William Morrill Wadley and Rebecca Barnard (Everingham) Wadley, Mary Wadley Raoul was born March 4, 1848. Before her marriage to William Greene Raoul in 1868, she lived in Savannah and Monroe, Louisiana. She attended school briefly in Cave Spring, Floyd County, Georgia, in 1866. The twenty years between 1870 and 1890 were spent raising her ten children in Macon, Savannah, and New York. After the family settled in Atlanta in 1892, Mary became active in a number of civic and social organizations. She served on the board of the Cotton States and International Exposition in 1895, was a charter member of the Every Saturday Club, and maintained memberships in the Daughters of the American Revolution and the United Daughters of the Confederacy. She was also involved in promoting the Free Kindergarten movement in Atlanta and one of the city's early kindergartens was named for her. She died August 1, 1936 in Atlanta.

Scope and Content Note

Papers of Mary Wadley Raoul include letters to her family (1865-1935), letters from relatives and friends (1884-1935), and a small group of miscellaneous materials. Most of the early Mary Raoul letters are to her husband and concern the children and family activities (1870-1886). Letters from 1886 through May 1907 are primarily to her daughter Mary Raoul Millis. These letters give news of family events, including the Central of Georgia election (1886-1887) and her own unwanted pregnancy (1888). After Mary's marriage to John Millis in 1893, letters offer advice on setting up housekeeping, clothes and sewing, managing servants, detecting pregnancy, family health problems, weddings, travels, William Jr.'s failures, her own depression (1904), and the death of Ruth Cunningham Raoul (1905). Beginning in June 1907, most of the letters are to her sister Sarah Wadley. Several of the letters relate to her support of the suffrage movement (1915-1919), including one written from the 1915 national convention in Washington, D.C.

The incoming letters are primarily from relatives. Miscellaneous materials include a journal she kept from 1872-1876 reporting mainly on the childhoods of her eldest children, Mary and William, Jr.

Arrangement Note

Arranged by record type.

Letters, 1865-1936
Box Folder Content
3 1 1865-1881
3 2 1882-1884
3 3 1885-1886, May
3 4 1886, July-September
3 5 1886, October-December
3 6 1887, January-March
3 7 1887, April-June
3 8 1889-1893
3 9 1894-1896
3 10 1897-1898
3 11 1899-1900
3 12 1901-1903
3 13 1904
4 1 1905-1906
4 2 1907
4 3 1912-1913
4 4 1914-1915
4 5 1916-1917
4 6 1918
4 7 1919, January-May
4 8 1919, June-December
4 9 1920
4 10 1934-1935
4 11 Undated
4 12 Letters from various persons, 1884-1906
4 13 Letters from various persons, 1907-1925
4 14 Letters from various persons, 1926-1936
Other papers
4 15 Journal, 1872-1876
4 16 Address to the Every Saturday History Class, December 1916
4 17 Miscellaneous
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