De Vera Habitus Forma a Beato Francisco Instituto Demonstrationes [Demonstrations on the True Form of the Habit Instituted by the Blessed Francis]

Emory University

Pitts Theology Library

1531 Dickey Drive, Suite 560

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-4166

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/f58qh


Descriptive Summary

Title: De Vera Habitus Forma a Beato Francisco Instituto Demonstrationes [Demonstrations on the True Form of the Habit Instituted by the Blessed Francis]
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 020
Extent: 0.5 cubic ft. (1 volume)
Abstract:Contains one vellum bound volume with four engravings and 17 pen and blue wash drawings along with text.
Language:Materials in Latin and French.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Unrestricted access.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], De Vera Habitus Forma a Beato Francisco Instituto Demonstrationes, Archives and Manuscript Dept., Pitts Theology Library, Emory University.

Processing

Processed by Anita K. Delaries, July 3, 1984.


Collection Description

Biographical Note

In the middle of the 17th century a controversy arose regarding the monkish habit and cowls of the Franciscan Order and of their offshoot, the Capuchins. The unknown author, apparently a Capuchin Monk, tried to prove to Pope Urban VIII in this work, the ancient tradition of the habits. He traces the habits and vestments of the Friar Minor back to St. Francis himself. Demonstrating that strict rules applied to this subject as early as the 13th century, he pays particular attention to the cowl and its form. The author hoped that his argument would lead the Pope to decide in favor of the traditionalists.

Scope and Content Note

This bound volume is in Latin with four engravings and 17 pen and blue wash drawings along with text on 68 leaves. From the incidence of numerous illustrations in Flanders and surrounding countries, it might be concluded that the manuscript originated in this region. Many of the sketches come from paintings, murals and glass windows in churches. The text is written in legible cursive and the preface is inscribed to Pope Urban VIII (1568-1644). The volume is bound in vellum.



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