The Comic Times and Littery [sic] Gazette, 1855-1874

Emory University

Pitts Theology Library

1531 Dickey Drive, Suite 560

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-4166

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/ghm9m


Descriptive Summary

Title: The Comic Times and Littery [sic] Gazette, 1855-1874
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 210
Extent: 0.1 cubic ft. (1 box)
Abstract:Contains one bound volume of three separate items: “The L– Times and Littery [sic] Gazette,” a newspaper parody; “Brother Richard’s Letters from the Great Metropolis,” a series of fictional letters from London; and a collection of original and copied poems and songs.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Unrestricted access.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], The Comic Times and Littery [sic] Gazette, Archives and Manuscript Dept., Pitts Theology Library, Emory University.

Processing

Processed by Anne Graham, 2001.


Collection Description

Biographical Note

The author of the piece is unknown. A handwritten note on the second page indicates it “was probably written by Rev. Ca-- Wise.” There is no additional information concerning the author.

Scope and Content Note

The bound volume consists of three separate items: “The L– Times and Littery [sic] Gazette,” a newspaper parody; “Brother Richard’s Letters from the Great Metropolis,” a series of fictional letters from London; and a collection of original and copied poems and songs. All sections are handwritten in ink on paper with the watermark “Joynson 1855.”

The first item is a parody of contemporary newspapers dated April 1855. It is nine pages in length and is divided into thirteen sections. It includes collections of satirical advertisements that use fictitious names like “Rev. F. B. Humble cum Bumble” and Mr. Frederick Goodfornothing Do-nothing Plushbreeches,” to ridicule religious, political, and social divisions. The author lampoons the struggle for power between conservatives Edward Stanley, Henry Palmerston, and George Hamilton-Gordon, as well as the reforms of parliamentarians John Bright and Richard Cobden, and the machinations of former Prime Minister Lord John Russell. Additional attacks fall on the court activities of Queen Victoria and the famous “Letters to His Son” by Philip Dormer Stanhope, the fourth earl of Chesterfield. The author ridicules British involvement in the Crimean War (1853-1856) in satirical dispatches from “Turn-nastipol” and a letter from Lord Raglan, who was widely criticized for his involvement in the decimation of the Light Brigade by Russian forces.

The next section, “Brother Richard’s Letters from the Great Metropolis” is a series of twelve letters from a fictitious correspondent who describes himself as a “bachelor country parson”from France. He relates several events while visiting London, including a visit by Napoleon and a lecture by Albert Richard Smith, noted for his presentations on the ascension of Mont Blanc. The author describes contemporary sites and scenes: a speech by William Ewart Gladstone in the House Commons; sermons delivered in Westminster Abbey, St. Stephens Walbrook, Saint Paul’s Cathedral, and St. James; an opera at Drury Lane Theater; and riders in Hyde Park. He also gives an account of visits to the Crystal Palace, the National Gallery, the Vernon Gallery, the British Museum, and the Globe. Of interest to the researcher are the numerous descriptions of London sites and daily life.

The last section contains three poems: “Answer” dated April 17, 1866; “Charade by a sentimental Baronet at Sunningdale” dated January 1, 1874; and “Charade by [illegible]” dated April 3, 1874. The last item is “A Capital Tri-O: a comic song in two parts from the celebrated opéra-bouffe by [illegible] as sung by Mlle Codella of the opera comisar [sic] a Paris” with no date.



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