WARD FAMILY.
Ward Family journal, 1876-1891

Emory University

Pitts Theology Library

1531 Dickey Drive, Suite 560

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-4166

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/ghs39


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Ward Family.
Title: Ward Family journal, 1876-1891
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 225
Extent: 0.1 cubic ft. (1 folder)
Abstract:Contains one bound volume of Rev. Ward’s schedule of preaching, recipes for dyes and herbal remedies, and a genealogical sketch by Mrs. Ward concerning her father’s family.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Unrestricted access.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], Ward Family Journal, Archives and Manuscript Dept., Pitts Theology Library, Emory University.

Processing

Processed by Anne Graham, 2002.


Collection Description

Biographical Note

J. C. Ward (1834-1892) moved from Georgia to Montague County, Texas, where he preached on a circuit that included northeast Texas; Miller County, Arkansas; Caddo Parish, Louisiana; and a portion of the Indian Territory, located in present-day Marshall County, Oklahoma. Ward’s duties in Texas extended to the counties of Bosque, Cass, Clay, Collin, Cooke, Franklin, Grayson, Jack, Lamar, Montague, Morris, Titus, Wood, and Young. Although Ward was a Methodist preacher, it is not known to which church he belonged: Methodist Episcopal Church, Methodist Episcopal Church, South, or the Methodist Protestant Church. All were active in the area during the period covered by the journal. Rev. J. C. Ward was buried in Bowie, Texas, in the Elmwood Cemetery.

Virginia Frances Mitchell Ward (1837-1892) was the daughter of R. L. Mitchell of Georgia. The Mitchell family hailed from Ireland, where her ancestors Hugh Mitchell and John Mitchell resided. In 1758 Mrs. Ward’s great-grandfather, William Mitchell, left Ireland to settle in Wilkerson County, Georgia. His eldest son, Benjamin Mitchell (1777-1849), was Mrs. Ward’s grandfather. Virginia Frances Ward is buried in Elmwood Cemetery with her husband.

Scope and Content Note

This collection consists of a bound volume containing Rev. Ward’s schedule of preaching, recipes for dyes and herbal remedies, and a genealogical sketch by Mrs. Ward concerning her father’s family. The preaching schedule covers the period 1876 to 1891 and gives an interesting look into the life of an early Methodist circuit rider. The schedule includes church names and locations, sermon titles, and lay preachers. It also mentions some funerals and foot washing services. Rev. Ward’s circuit extended to no less than eighty-five congregations, some of which met in school rooms and private homes. In addition to his schedule, Ward kept financial account of fees and gifts he received as well as statistics such as miles traveled, sermons preached, and homes visited.

The journal also contains directions for making yellow dye, a liniment to relieve pain, and eye balsam, as well as remedies for rheumatism, cholera, and erysipelas. It is not known whether these were collected by Rev. or Mrs. Ward.

The genealogical sketch recounts six generations of the Mitchell family, from Hugh Mitchell to her father, R. L. Mitchell. It also includes branches of the family settling in Gadsden County, Florida and south Texas. The piece was written in 1884 and is signed by Virginia Ward.

The journal is bound in leather and contains the inscription, “V.F. Ward, Montague, Tex.” on the inside flap. The line, “Land Notes,” is written on the outside back cover. All entries are handwritten in ink or pencil.



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