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BARKER, MARY CORNELIA, 1879-1963.
Mary Cornelia Barker papers, 1912-1971

Emory University

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/8xzgz


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Barker, Mary Cornelia, 1879-1963.
Title: Mary Cornelia Barker papers, 1912-1971
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 528
Extent: 5.5 linear ft. (10 boxes)
Abstract:Papers of Atlanta educator and activist Mary Cornelia Barker including correspondence, organizational records, and printed material.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Unrestricted access.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Source

Gift, 1972 with subsequent additions.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], Mary Cornelia Barker papers, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.


Collection Description

Biographical Note

Mary Cornelia Barker, educator and labor activist (1879-1963), was born in Atlanta, Georgia, the daughter of Thomas Nathaniel and Dora (Lovejoy) Barker. She received her early education in Polk County, Georgia, where her family resided briefly. In 1894 she entered Agnes Scott Institute in Decatur Georgia and graduated from Agnes Scott College in 1900. Miss Barker held teaching positions in Stockbridge and McDonough, Georgia, and at the Decatur Orphans Home in Decatur, before beginning her forty years of employment with the Atlanta Public Schools in 1904. She was a teacher in the Williams Street School (1904-1911) and North Avenue School (1911-1921). She served as principal of the Ivy Street School (1921-1922), Fair Street School (1922- 1923), and John B. Gordon School (1923-1944). She retired in 1944.

An early leader in the movement to organize teachers in Atlanta to improve their position and working conditions, Mary Barker supported the affiliation of the Atlanta Public School Teachers Association (as Local 89) with the American Federation of Teachers in 1919. She served as president of Local 89 from 1921 to 1923 and of the American Federation of Teachers from 1925 to 1931. She was instrumental in four gains made by Atlanta teachers in the 1920's: provision for tenure (1922), consistent, firmly integrated salary schedules for elementary and high school teachers (1926), initial step toward retirement benefits (1927), and formation of the Atlanta Public School Teachers Association Credit Union (1929).

In 1927 Mary Barker helped to found the Southern Summer School for Women Workers in Industry (later, The Southern Summer School for Workers, Inc.), which, at its summer sessions in various places in Virginia and the Carolinas, trained leaders for the labor movement. Miss Barker served as chairman of the central committee for some 15 years, and for the last few years before the school disbanded in 1951, she served on its advisory committee.

In keeping with her labor concerns, Mary Barker belonged to the Atlanta Federation of Trades and Georgia Federation of Labor. In 1927, as labor's representative, she was the first woman appointed to the Georgia State Board for Vocational Education.

Mary Barker was one of the early leaders of the biracial movement in Atlanta. She belonged to the Atlanta Urban League, Fulton-DeKalb Committee on Interracial Cooperation, and the Georgia Committee of the Commission on Interracial Cooperation. She served on the board of Phyllis Wheatley Branch of the Atlanta Y.W.C.A. Miss Barker encouraged Atlanta's black teachers to form a union and to work through it for better working conditions and for salaries equal to those paid white teachers.

Mary Barker took an active role in numerous other city, state, and regional organizations. These included the Atlanta Forum Association, Atlanta League of Women Shoppers, Atlanta League of Women Voters, Community Chest, United Liberal Church, Citizens Fact-Finding Movement, and the Southern Conference for Human Welfare.

Miss Barker died in Atlanta on September 15, 1963 after a long illness and was buried in Rockmart, Georgia. Sources of biographical information on Mary Cornelia Barker included the Georgia Vocational News, VIII (November, 1927), 1; and the Atlanta Constitution, September 18, 1963, December 27, 1963. Information about Tommie Dora Barker was found in the Atlanta Constitution, September 4, 1954, January 17, 1955.

Mary Cornelia Barker, educator and labor activist (1879-1963), was born in Atlanta, Georgia, the daughter of Thomas Nathaniel and Dora (Lovejoy) Barker. She received her early education in Polk County, Georgia, where her family resided briefly. In 1894 she entered Agnes Scott Institute in Decatur Georgia and graduated from Agnes Scott College in 1900. Miss Barker held teaching positions in Stockbridge and McDonough, Georgia, and at the Decatur Orphans Home in Decatur, before beginning her forty years of employment with the Atlanta Public Schools in 1904. She was a teacher in the Williams Street School (1904-1911) and North Avenue School (1911-1921). She served as principal of the Ivy Street School (1921-1922), Fair Street School (1922- 1923), and John B. Gordon School (1923-1944). She retired in 1944.

An early leader in the movement to organize teachers in Atlanta to improve their position and working conditions, Mary Barker supported the affiliation of the Atlanta Public School Teachers Association (as Local 89) with the American Federation of Teachers in 1919. She served as president of Local 89 from 1921 to 1923 and of the American Federation of Teachers from 1925 to 1931. She was instrumental in four gains made by Atlanta teachers in the 1920's: provision for tenure (1922), consistent, firmly integrated salary schedules for elementary and high school teachers (1926), initial step toward retirement benefits (1927), and formation of the Atlanta Public School Teachers Association Credit Union (1929).

In 1927 Mary Barker helped to found the Southern Summer School for Women Workers in Industry (later, The Southern Summer School for Workers, Inc.), which, at its summer sessions in various places in Virginia and the Carolinas, trained leaders for the labor movement. Miss Barker served as chairman of the central committee for some 15 years, and for the last few years before the school disbanded in 1951, she served on its advisory committee.

In keeping with her labor concerns, Mary Barker belonged to the Atlanta Federation of Trades and Georgia Federation of Labor. In 1927, as labor's representative, she was the first woman appointed to the Georgia State Board for Vocational Education.

Mary Barker was one of the early leaders of the biracial movement in Atlanta. She belonged to the Atlanta Urban League, Fulton-DeKalb Committee on Interracial Cooperation, and the Georgia Committee of the Commission on Interracial Cooperation. She served on the board of Phyllis Wheatley Branch of the Atlanta Y.W.C.A. Miss Barker encouraged Atlanta's black teachers to form a union and to work through it for better working conditions and for salaries equal to those paid white teachers.

Mary Barker took an active role in numerous other city, state, and regional organizations. These included the Atlanta Forum Association, Atlanta League of Women Shoppers, Atlanta League of Women Voters, Community Chest, United Liberal Church, Citizens Fact-Finding Movement, and the Southern Conference for Human Welfare.

Miss Barker died in Atlanta on September 15, 1963 after a long illness and was buried in Rockmart, Georgia. Sources of biographical information on Mary Cornelia Barker included the Georgia Vocational News, VIII (November, 1927), 1; and the Atlanta Constitution, September 18, 1963, December 27, 1963. Information about Tommie Dora Barker was found in the Atlanta Constitution, September 4, 1954, January 17, 1955.

Scope and Content Note

The collection consists of correspondence, organizational records, printed matter, and clippings related to Mary Barker's involvement in the American Federation of Teachers, Atlanta Public School Teachers Association Credit Union, and Southern Summer School for Women Workers in Industry. In addition, there are subject folders of correspondence, records and printed matter related to organizations and causes that interested Miss Barker (e. g. the.Affiliated Schools for Workers, American Civil Liberties Union, Atlanta Urban League, Commission on Interracial Cooperation, League of Women Voters, Y. W. C. A.). Also included in the collection are newspaper clippings about and directories of the Atlanta Public Schools; six mimeographed papers on the evolution of trade and transportation in various Southern cities, written between 1912 and 1914 by Eugene H. Hinton, Chairman of the Southeastern Freight Association; and a collection of the publications of Tommie Dora Barker.

Prominent correspondents represented in the collection include: Jessie Daniel Ames, Marv Anderson, W. T. Anderson, Roger Nash Baldwin, Ada M. Barker, Tommie Dora Barker, Bernard Borah, Selma Borchardt, ,William Holmes Borders, Marion Luther Brittain, Wright Bryan, John Sanford Cohen, Tarleton Collier, George Sylvester Counts, John Dewey, James Anderson Dombrowski, Mercer Griffin Evans, Margaret Fisher, Walter Franklin George, Cullen Bryant Gosnell, Frank Porter Graham, William Green,, William Julius Harris, William Berry Hartsfield, John Haynes Holmes, Evalene Parsons Jackson, Brownie Lee Jones, Meredith Ashby Jones, W.P. Kellam, Abraham Lefkowitz, Henry Richardson Linville, Leroy Earl Loemker, Nat G. Long, Ralph Emerson McGill, Louise Leonard, McLaren, Lucy Randolph Mason, Armand May, Broadus Mitchell, Abraham John Muste, Lucile Nix, Arthur Franklin Raper, Florence Rood, Gay E. Shepperson, Muggsy M. Smith, Jack J. Spalding, Charles B. Stillman, Norman Mattoon Thomas, Harry Frederick Ward, and Manning Yeomans.

Arrangement Note

Arranged by record type or subject.


Selected Search Terms

Personal Names

Corporate Names

Topical Terms

Geographic Names

Occupation


Container List

American Federation of Teachers
Box Folder Content
1 1 Correspondence, 1921-1922
1 2 Correspondence, 1923-1931
1 3 Correspondence, 1935-1940
1 4 Correspondence, 1941-1958
1 5 Miscellaneous records, 1918-1922 [Note: These records, which are arranged chronologically, include bulletins, committee reports, financial statements, presidential addresses and reports, and resolutions.]
1 6 Miscellaneous records, 1923-1928
1 7 Supplementary Report to the Fourteenth Annual Convention of the American Federation of Teachers, 1929
1 8 Miscellaneous records, 1931-1934
1 9 Miscellaneous records, 1935
1 10 Miscellaneous records, 1936
1 11 Miscellaneous records, 1938-1951
2 1 Clippings 1925-1932
2 2 Clippings 1935-1936
2 3 Printed matter, 1920-1931
2 4 Printed matter, 1932-1942
2 5 Printed matter, no date
2 6 Report of Proceedings of Annual Convention of AFT, 1925-1934
Atlanta Public School Teachers Association
3 1 Correspondence, 1919-1921
3 2 Correspondence, 1922-1924
3 3 Correspondence, 1925-1927
3 4 Correspondence, 1928-1930
3 5 Correspondence, 1931-1935
3 6 Correspondence, 1936-1941
3 7 Notes, 1919-1923
3 8 Notes, 1924-1941 and no date
3 9 Mary Barker's History of the Atlanta Public School Teacher's Association, Local 89, written 1950
3 10 Miscellaneous Records, 1920-1921 [Note: These records, which are arranged chronologically, include lists of the association's accomplishments and officers, notices and minutes of meetings (committee, directors, general), financial statements, policy statements, proposals, questionnaires, reports, and resolutions.]
3 11 Miscellaneous Records, 1922-1923
3 12 Miscellaneous Records, 1924-1926
3 13 Miscellaneous Records, 1927-1929
3 14 Miscellaneous Records, 1930-1934
4 1 Miscellaneous Records, 1935-1936
4 2 Miscellaneous Records, 1937-1940
4 3 Miscellaneous Records, 1941-1954
4 4 Miscellaneous Records, no date
4 5 Clippings, 1919-1929
4 6 Clippings, 1932-1949
4 7 Constitution and By-Laws, 1911-1931
4 8 Roster, Guide and Yearbook, 1923-1925
4 9 Printed Matter, 1922-1940, no date
Atlanta Public School Teachers Association Credit Union
4 10 Miscellaneous Records, 1928-1940 [Note: These records, which are arranged chronologically, include announcements, correspondence, financial reports and minutes.]
4 11-12 Miscellaneous Records, 1941-1943, no date
4 13-14 Printed Matter, 1926-1943, no date
4 15 Membership Record Book for Gordon School Credit Union, 1928-1941
Southern Summer School for Women Workers in Industry
5 1 Correspondence, 1928-1933
5 2 Correspondence, 1934
5 3 Correspondence, 1935
5 4 Correspondence, 1936-1939
5 5 Correspondence, 1940
5 6 Correspondence, 1946-1951
5 7 Miscellaneous Records, 1930-1932 [Note: These records, which are arranged chronologically, include budgets, course descriptions, director's reports, financial statements, lists of students, minutes of committee meetings, notes, programs, and speeches.]
5 8 Miscellaneous Records, 1933
5 9 Miscellaneous Records, January-August, 1934
5 10 Miscellaneous Records, September-December, 1934
5 11 Miscellaneous Records, January-April, 1935
5 12 Miscellaneous Records, June-December, 1935
6 1 Records, 1936-1939
6 2 Records, 1939
6 3 Records, 1940
6 4 Records, 1945-1950
6 5 Records, Barker Notes, no date
6 6 Clippings, 1927-1937
6 7 Photographs, no date
6 8 Printed Matter, 1927-1947
6 9 Scrapbooks, 1930-1937
6 10 Scrapbooks, 1938-1940, no date
Subject Files
7 1 Affiliated Schools for Workers, Atlanta Project, 1933-1934
7 2 Affiliated Schools for Workers, Atlanta Project, 1933-1934
7 3 American Civil Liberties Union, 1929-1935
7 4 American Civil Liberties Union Pamphlets, 1927-1932
7 5 Association of Southern Women for the Prevention of Lynching, 1941-1942
7 6 Atlanta Federation of Trades, Citizenship Committee, 1931-1932
7 7 Atlanta Forum Association, 1930-1934
7 8 Atlanta Forum Association, 1930-1934
7 9 Atlanta Teachers Union (Negro) Teachers Equal Pay Suit Bulletins, 1947
7 10 Atlanta Teachers Union, 1941-1948
7 11 Atlanta Urban League, 1932-1954
7 12 Biographical Information re M.C. Barker
8 1 Citizens Fact-Finding Movement, 1939
8 2 Civil Liberties Issues and Cases, 1929-1943 (including material on cases of Angelo Herndon, Scottsboro Boys)
8 3 Commission.on Interracial Cooperation, Georgia Committee, 1938-1942
8 4 Committee on Workers Education, 1927-1937
8 5 County Unit System, 1933-1947
8 6 Fulton-DeKalb Committee on Interracial Cooperation, 1939-1943
8 7 Georgia Council on Human Relations, 1961
8 8 Greater Atlanta Council on Human Relations, 1957
8 9 League of Women Shoppers, 1938-1940
8 10 League of Women Voters of Atlanta-Fulton County, 1946-1961
8 11 League of Women Voters of Atlanta-Fulton County, 1962-1971, no date
8 12 Miscellaneous Printed Matter
8 13 Miscellaneous Printed Matter
8 14 Miscellaneous Printed Matter, "Southern Patriot" and "The Southern Frontier"
9 1 National Education Association, 1930-1941
9 2 Ponce de Leon Development Association, 1957
9 3 Race Relations - Miscellaneous, 1940-1956
9 4 Scott, W.J., Publications, 1941
9 5 Social Workers Club Roster, 1933-1934
9 6 Southern Conference for Human Welfare, 1938-1946
9 7 Southern Institute for International Relations, 1935
9 8 Sutton, W.A., 1930
9 9 Workers Defense league, 1940-1942
9 10 Y.W.C.A., 1935-1941
Newspaper Clippings, 1915-1961
9 11 Scrapbook of Clippings re Atlanta Public Schools, 1915-1918
9 12 Clippings - Atlanta Public Schools, 1918
9 13 Clippings - Atlanta Public Schools, 1919
9 14 Clippings - Atlanta Public Schools, 1920
9 15 Clippings - Atlanta Public Schools, 1921-1923
9 16 Clippings - Atlanta Public Schools, 1924-1925
9 17 Clippings - Atlanta Public Schools, 1926-1944
9 18 Clippings - Miscellaneous, 1929-1961
9 19 Clippings - Race Relations, 1925-1947
Printed Material: Atlanta Public School Directories, 1922-1944, and Printed Matter on Education, 1927-1932
10 1 Atlanta Public School Directories, 1922-1944
10 2 Rules and Regulations of the Board of Education of Atlanta, Ga. (1927)
10 3 The Horace Mann School: A Modern School for Modern Children (1932)
10 4 Hinton, Eugene H.: Southeastern Freight Association, 1912-1914
Tommie Dora Barker
10 5 Tommie Dora Barker - Miscellaneous
10 6 Publications of Tommie Dora Barker, 1921-1935
10 7 Publications of Tommie Dora Barker, 1937-1942
10 8 Publications of Tommie Dora Barker, 1945-1957
10 9 Settelmayer, John, Controversy, 1959-1960
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