Nov 13-Feb 1, Rose Library will be by appointment only, requiring one week's notice. Please contact rose.library@emory.edu for assistance.

BONE, ROBERT DONNELL, 1832-1892.
Robert Donnell Bone papers, 1861-1892 (bulk 1861-1863)

Emory University

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/8z11f


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Bone, Robert Donnell, 1832-1892.
Title: Robert Donnell Bone papers, 1861-1892 (bulk 1861-1863)
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 406
Extent: 1 microfilm reel (MF)
Abstract:Microfilm copy of Civil War letters between Dr. Robert Donnell Bone, assistant surgeon, 12th Texas Infantry Regiment, and his wife, Griselda Minerva Burk Bone, as well as other family papers.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on access

Unrestricted access.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Source

Loaned for microfilming, 1963.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], Robert Donnell Bone papers, Manuscript, Archives and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Processed by MRD, July 1963.


Collection Description

Biographical Note

Dr. Robert Donnell Bone (April 8, 1832 - February 24, 1892) was born in Wilson County, Tennessee, and moved with his family to Nacogdoches County, Texas in 1841. He graduated in 1858 with a medical degree from the University of Nashville. On December 15, 1856 he married Minerva Burk, the daughter of James Burk. Minerva was born January 1841 in Winchester County, Tennessee and had migrated to Texas with her parents in 1848. Both families were Presbyterian. Dr. and Mrs. Bone had two sons, Watson Bone, born in 1860 (died in 1862) and Winstead Bone, born in 1861. Dr. Bone entered the Confederate service as assistant surgeon of Col. Overton Young's Texas Infantry (12th Texas Infantry Regiment, sometimes called the 8th) in November 1861. He left the service in December 1862 after being rejected by an Army medical board. In 1867 he went to Cherokee County and remained there until his death.

Dr. Robert Donnell Bone (April 8, 1832 - February 24, 1892) was born in Wilson County, Tennessee, and moved with his family to Nacogdoches County, Texas in 1841. He graduated in 1858 with a medical degree from the University of Nashville. On December 15, 1856 he married Minerva Burk, the daughter of James Burk. Minerva was born January 1841 in Winchester County, Tennessee and had migrated to Texas with her parents in 1848. Both families were Presbyterian. Dr. and Mrs. Bone had two sons, Watson Bone, born in 1860 (died in 1862) and Winstead Bone, born in 1861. Dr. Bone entered the Confederate service as assistant surgeon of Col. Overton Young's Texas Infantry (12th Texas Infantry Regiment, sometimes called the 8th) in November 1861. He left the service in December 1862 after being rejected by an Army medical board. In 1867 he went to Cherokee County and remained there until his death.

Scope and Content Note

The collection consists of a microfilm copy of a typescript of the Civil War letters of Dr. Robert Donnell Bone, assistant surgeon, 12th Texas Infantry Regiment, and his wife, Griselda Minerva Burk Bone: approximately 30 letters by Dr. Bone to his wife, November 10, 1861 - February 10, 1863; 22 letters and a poem from his wife to Dr. Bone, December 19, 1861 - February 6, 1863. Most of Dr. Bone's service was in Texas although he served for a short time in Arkansas near Arkadelphia. Dr. Bone's letters give little information about his duties as a surgeon but a great deal about soldier morale. Mrs. Bone's letters give details about life in a rural Texas community: household duties, improvisations, religion, public morale and neighborhood gossip, as well as expressions of loneliness and devotion to her husband.

Also included are copies of photographs of Dr. and Mrs. Bone; 2 letters by Col. Overton Young, 12th Texas Infantry Regiment, recommending him for appointment as Assistant Surgeon; an expression of confidence signed by company commanders of his regiment upon his resignation; a Special Order stating that Dr. Bone had been rejected by the Army Medical Board; and several newspaper clippings including an obituary of Dr. Bone.


Selected Search Terms

Personal Names

Corporate Names

Topical Terms

Geographic Names

Occupation


v1.11.0-dev