Series 1
Correspondence, 1846-1946
Boxes 1-43 and BV1-2

Scope and Content Note

The correspondence, 1846-1946, is official in nature, relating to Candler's responsibilities as a minister, editor, college president, bishop, and university chancellor. Most of the letters fall between 1877, the year of his marriage, and 1934, the year of his retirement as a bishop. There is particular concentration in 1914-1915 and 1925. Scattered throughout the correspondence are family letters. The letters, both general and personal, are detailed and well written.

Among the early items is a resolution passed on October 27, 1862 by the mayor and council of LaGrange expressing sympathy on the death of Captain John C. Curtright, Candler's father-in-law. There is some correspondence regarding Candler's ministries at the Sixth Church, Atlanta, and St. John's Methodist Episcopal Church, South, Augusta, Georgia. Several documents relate to a morals investigation (1884) of members of St. John's Church. Other correspondence pertains to Candler's work in founding Paine Institute. Included is the petition for a charter filed with the Richmond County Court (1882).

From the period when Candler was assistant editor of the Nashville Christian Advocate (1886-1888), the largest body of correspondence relates to the so-called Abbot Sensation, caused by a sermon on the evils of theater going that Candler delivered on October 9, 1887 in the McKendree Church in Nashville. Present in the congregation was Emma Abbott, a well known actress and singer, who responded briefly to Candler's criticisms. Comments about the incident and issues it represented appear throughout the correspondence for the remainder of 1887.

Correspondence focuses on Emory College after Candler's election to the presidency in June, 1888. Topics discussed include college finances, faculty selection, student discipline, student aid, academic chairs, construction of the library building (1896-1898), and organization of an Alumni Association (1896-1898). The resignation of Henry Anselm Scomp (1843-1913) from his chair of Greek in the summer of 1894 after a dispute with Candler over curriculum changes was a subject of much correspondence. Letters on this issue continued into October and November, 1894, when Scomp solicited recommendations from trustees as he sought teaching positions elsewhere. Two letterbooks (497 pp.; 494 pp., 288 of them blank; filed with bound volumes) with letterpress copies of some of Candler's outgoing correspondence from 1889 to 1895 contain more information on college finances, faculty appointments, and the Scomp controversy.

Correspondence during his college presidency also discussed women's suffrage, temperance, prohibition (especially in conjunction with Georgia elections of 1892), education, and missions in China and Korea. In addition, there are many letters regarding Candler's service as personal financial trustee for Atticus Greene Haygood (1839-1896), Methodist bishop and former Emory College president, from 1892 through 1896. Candler supervised payments on debts and conducted a subscription drive to purchase a home for Haygood in 1894. A ledger book and subscription list relating to these matters are filed in the special folder of Haygood/Candler letters. Correspondence in 1898 and 1899 deals with Candler's efforts to help Lundy Howard Harris (1859-1910), clergyman and former Emory College faculty member, obtain a teaching position, and to advise his wife Corra May White Harris (1869-1935).

Candler's Episcopal correspondence regularly includes discussions of appointments of ministers and presiding elders in conferences under his supervision. Many letters during the first four years of his bishopric (1898-1902) relate to the controversial claim of the Publishing House of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South against the United States for property damages caused by Federal occupation of its building from 1863 to 1865. Mission work in Cuba receives frequent discussion beginning in fall, 1898. There are also letters in 1899 regarding Sarah Antoinette (Nettie) Candler's efforts to raise funds to purchase organs for Cuban mission stations and to repair the church in Oxford, Georgia.

In 1902 and 1903 much correspondence relates to the forced resignation of Andrew Sledd (1870-1939), Candler's son-in-law, from the faculty of Emory College for his article "The Negro: Another View" in Atlantic Monthly (July, 1902). The article, which criticizes lynching and emphasizes human rights of Negroes, achieved notoriety for Sledd after Rebecca Latimer Felton (1835-1930), an enemy of Warren Candler on educational and racial issues, gave it publicity in the AtlantaConstitution. Candler defended Sledd and helped him to find another academic position. An article Candler wrote in the Constitution (September 9, 1903) denouncing mob rule in regard to lynching drew many favorable letters from blacks.

Topics discussed after 1903 include mission work in Cuba, Mexico, China, Japan, and Korea; organization of the Wesley Memorial Hospital; changes in the church's position toward Vanderbilt University; woman's suffrage; and Paine College. In addition, there is a wealth of detailed correspondence regarding the Mount Vernon Place Methodist Episcopal Church, South, Washington, D.C. Subjects examined include selection of the site based on demographic analysis of the city, real estate purchases, architectural plans, construction operations, subscriptions to the building fund, and pastors.

Much of the correspondence in 1914 relates to Candler's work as chairman of the Methodist Episcopal Church South – Educational Commission, which arranged the severing of ties with Vanderbilt University and establishing of two other Methodist universities. There is a particularly detailed account of the organization of what came to be called Emory University. Topics considered include recruitment of students, selection of faculty, organization of the School of Theology, purchase of Atlanta Medical College, campaign for endowment, position of Emory University Academy, relocation of Emory College to Atlanta, organization of the School of Law, construction of buildings, and adjustments necessitated by World War I. Southern Methodist University in Dallas also received much attention.

From 1916 through 1926 the proposed union of the Northern and Southern Methodist churches was the subject uppermost in Candler's correspondence. Many of the letters came from opponents of unification, who were especially interested in the role suggested for blacks in the unified church and in what they perceived as Northern subjugation of the Southern church. Included are letters and reports regarding the Methodist Episcopal Church, South - Commission on Unification, of which Candler was a member. Much correspondence from 1924 to 1926 deals with his activities as chairman of the central committee of the Association to Preserve Southern Methodism by Defeating Proposed Plan of Unification. This group led the successful fight against ratification of the plan in the annual conferences in opposition to the Friends of Unification directed by Bishop Edwin DuBose Mouzon (1869-1937).

Correspondence from Candler's last seven years as a bishop (1927-1934) relates to a wide variety of subjects, none of which are examined as deeply as unification was in the preceding decade. These subjects include the Methodist Episcopal Church, South - General Hospital Board; relief work among Cuban missions after storm damage in spring, 1927; and relief work in flooded areas of Mississippi in summer, 1927. Much correspondence from July through November, 1928 examines the appropriate position of the Southern Methodist church in regard to prohibition and the Democratic presidential candidacy of Alfred Emanuel Smith. The subject of unification recurs sporadically between 1929 and 1938. Charges against Bishop James Cannon (1864- ) for his alleged gambling with stock investments, inappropriate political involvement, and personal liaisons provided a topic of much correspondence from July, 1929 through December, 1931 and in April, 1934. A number of other letters deal with Candler's efforts to raise funds for repairing the church in Oxford, Georgia (1932-1933).

Correspondence following his retirement contains little of particular interest.

The family correspondence, which is interfiled chronologically with the general correspondence, includes many exchanges of letters between Warren and Nettie Candler when his travels separated them. These begin with thirteen letters that Nettie Curtright wrote to Warren during their courtship (June-November, 1877). In these letters Nettie discusses her attitudes toward marriage and the education of women, including her studies at LaGrange College. There are also a number of letters from Nettie to her mother commenting on her marriage and routine household and social activities. The family correspondence includes condolences on the deaths of the Candlers' infant sons Warren (1888) and Emory (1894). Several letters to Warren Candler from his youngest son Samuel Charles mention his wartime army service in France (October, 1918) and Germany (January, 1919). In addition, there are numerous letters criticizing Asa Griggs Candler's plan to marry a Catholic divorcee as his second wife (September-October, 1922). Personal correspondence also relates to Warren Candler's seventieth and seventy-fifth birthday celebrations (1927, 1932), fiftieth wedding anniversary (1927), loss of his brother Asa (1929), recognition as First Citizen of Atlanta (1933), and retirement (1934). The personal correspondence concludes with condolences on the deaths of Warren Candler (1941) and Nettie Candler (1943).

Prominent family members whose correspondence is represented in the collection include Asa Griggs Candler, Charles Howard Candler, Charles Murphey Candler, Ezekiel Samuel Candler, John Slaughter Candler, Milton Anthony Candler, Samuel Charles Candler, Walter Turner Candler, Florence Candler Harris, and Andrew Sledd.

Other prominent correspondents include: Emma Abbott, William Charles Adamson, William Newman Ainsworth, Young John Allen, Myrta Lockett Avary; Augustus Octavius Bacon, Alben William Barkley, William Benjamin Beauchamp, William Melvin Bell, Hiram Abiff Boaz, Charles Henry Brent, Marion Luther Brittain, William Jennings Bryan; James Cannon, Alexander Stephens Clay, Andrew Jackson Cobb, Harvey Warren Cox, Charles Robert Crisp, William George Etler Cunnyngham; Josephus Daniels, Urban Valentine William Darlington, Collins Denny, James Edward Dickey, Capers Dickson, Hoyt McWhorter Dobbs, Charles Edward Dowman, Horace Mellard DuBose; Harry Stillwell Edwards, Clement Anselm Evans; Rebecca Latimer Felton, Oscar Penn Fitzgerald, Tomlinson Fort, Benjamin Wynn Fortson, Henry H. Fout; Charles Betts Galloway, Walter Franklin George, Carter Glass, Thomas Kearney Glenn, Wilbur Fiske Glenn, Edgar Johnson Goodspeed, John Brown Gordon, John Temple Graves; Corra May White Harris, Henry Harris, Lundy Howard Harris, Nathaniel Edwin Harris, William Albinus Harris, Pat Harrison, Joseph Crane Hartzell, Samuel Ross Hay, Atticus Greene Haygood, Hiram Warner Hill, Hamilton Holt, Isaac Stiles Hopkins, Clark Howell, Dudley Mays Hughes; Samuel Martin Inman; Edgar Hutchinson Johnson, Samuel Porter Jones; John Christian Keener, Joseph Staunton Key, John Carlisle Kilgo, Lucian Lamar Knight; Andrew Jackson Lamar, Walter Russell Lambuth, Marion Elias Lazenby, Ivy Lee Ledbetter, William Presley Lovejoy, William Cuyler Lovett; William Fletcher McMurry; Earle Bradford Mayfield, Robert Abner Meek, Wightman Fletcher Melton, Robert Cotter Mizell, Arthur James Moore, John Monroe Moore, Henry Clay Morrison, Edwin DuBose Mouzon, Anthony Moultrie Muckenfuss; George Mountrie Napier, Louis DeVotie Newton, Thomas Manson Norwood; Howard Washington Odum, Lee Slater Overman; Robert Emory Park, Mansfield Theodore Peed, Angus Perkerson, Ulrich Bonnell Phillips, William Washington Pinson, Clare Purcell; William Fletcher Quillian; Joseph Eugene Ransdell, Syngman Rhee, Charles Elmer Rice, Ernest Gladstone Richardson, Henry Wade Rogers, Daniel Calhoun Roper, Dunbar Rowland; Charles Claude Selecman, George Samuel Sexton, Sam White Small, Alexander Coke Smith, Alfred Franklin Smith, Charles Alphonso Smith, George Gilman Smith, Hoke Smith, Jack J. Spalding, Leslie Jasper Steele, Harlan Fiske Stone, William Sulzer, Willis Anderson Sutton; Samuel Tate, John Telford, Joseph Merriwether Terrell, Maurice Thompson, William Danner Thompson, John James Tigert, H.M. Turner; William David Upshaw; Henry Van Dyke; Seth Ward, Frances Elizabeth Willard, Alpheus Waters Wilson, Augusta Jane Evans Wilson, James Edgar Wilson, William Lyne Wilson, Woodrow Wilson, George Winship, Comer McDonald Woodward; George Wesley Yarbrough, and Tchi Ho Yun.

Arrangement Note

Primarily arranged in chronological order.

Scope and Content Note The correspondence, 1846-1946, is official in nature, relating to Candler's responsibilities as a minister, editor, college president, bishop, and university chancellor. Most of the letters fall between 1877, the year of his marriage, and 1934, the year of his retirement as a bishop. There is particular concentration in 1914-1915 and 1925. Scattered throughout the correspondence are family letters. The letters, both general and personal, are detailed and well written. Among the early items is a resolution passed on October 27, 1862 by the mayor and council of LaGrange expressing sympathy on the death of Captain John C. Curtright, Candler's father-in-law. There is some correspondence regarding Candler's ministries at the Sixth Church, Atlanta, and St. John's Methodist Episcopal Church, South, Augusta, Georgia. Several documents relate to a morals investigation (1884) of members of St. John's Church. Other correspondence pertains to Candler's work in founding Paine Institute. Included is the petition for a charter filed with the Richmond County Court (1882). From the period when Candler was assistant editor of the Nashville Christian Advocate (1886-1888), the largest body of correspondence relates to the so-called Abbot Sensation, caused by a sermon on the evils of theater going that Candler delivered on October 9, 1887 in the McKendree Church in Nashville. Present in the congregation was Emma Abbott, a well known actress and singer, who responded briefly to Candler's criticisms. Comments about the incident and issues it represented appear throughout the correspondence for the remainder of 1887. Correspondence focuses on Emory College after Candler's election to the presidency in June, 1888. Topics discussed include college finances, faculty selection, student discipline, student aid, academic chairs, construction of the library building (1896-1898), and organization of an Alumni Association (1896-1898). The resignation of Henry Anselm Scomp (1843-1913) from his chair of Greek in the summer of 1894 after a dispute with Candler over curriculum changes was a subject of much correspondence. Letters on this issue continued into October and November, 1894, when Scomp solicited recommendations from trustees as he sought teaching positions elsewhere. Two letterbooks (497 pp.; 494 pp., 288 of them blank; filed with bound volumes) with letterpress copies of some of Candler's outgoing correspondence from 1889 to 1895 contain more information on college finances, faculty appointments, and the Scomp controversy. Correspondence during his college presidency also discussed women's suffrage, temperance, prohibition (especially in conjunction with Georgia elections of 1892), education, and missions in China and Korea. In addition, there are many letters regarding Candler's service as personal financial trustee for Atticus Greene Haygood (1839-1896), Methodist bishop and former Emory College president, from 1892 through 1896. Candler supervised payments on debts and conducted a subscription drive to purchase a home for Haygood in 1894. A ledger book and subscription list relating to these matters are filed in the special folder of Haygood/Candler letters. Correspondence in 1898 and 1899 deals with Candler's efforts to help Lundy Howard Harris (1859-1910), clergyman and former Emory College faculty member, obtain a teaching position, and to advise his wife Corra May White Harris (1869-1935). Candler's Episcopal correspondence regularly includes discussions of appointments of ministers and presiding elders in conferences under his supervision. Many letters during the first four years of his bishopric (1898-1902) relate to the controversial claim of the Publishing House of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South against the United States for property damages caused by Federal occupation of its building from 1863 to 1865. Mission work in Cuba receives frequent discussion beginning in fall, 1898. There are also letters in 1899 regarding Sarah Antoinette (Nettie) Candler's efforts to raise funds to purchase organs for Cuban mission stations and to repair the church in Oxford, Georgia. In 1902 and 1903 much correspondence relates to the forced resignation of Andrew Sledd (1870-1939), Candler's son-in-law, from the faculty of Emory College for his article "The Negro: Another View" in Atlantic Monthly (July, 1902). The article, which criticizes lynching and emphasizes human rights of Negroes, achieved notoriety for Sledd after Rebecca Latimer Felton (1835-1930), an enemy of Warren Candler on educational and racial issues, gave it publicity in the AtlantaConstitution. Candler defended Sledd and helped him to find another academic position. An article Candler wrote in the Constitution (September 9, 1903) denouncing mob rule in regard to lynching drew many favorable letters from blacks. Topics discussed after 1903 include mission work in Cuba, Mexico, China, Japan, and Korea; organization of the Wesley Memorial Hospital; changes in the church's position toward Vanderbilt University; woman's suffrage; and Paine College. In addition, there is a wealth of detailed correspondence regarding the Mount Vernon Place Methodist Episcopal Church, South, Washington, D.C. Subjects examined include selection of the site based on demographic analysis of the city, real estate purchases, architectural plans, construction operations, subscriptions to the building fund, and pastors. Much of the correspondence in 1914 relates to Candler's work as chairman of the Methodist Episcopal Church South – Educational Commission, which arranged the severing of ties with Vanderbilt University and establishing of two other Methodist universities. There is a particularly detailed account of the organization of what came to be called Emory University. Topics considered include recruitment of students, selection of faculty, organization of the School of Theology, purchase of Atlanta Medical College, campaign for endowment, position of Emory University Academy, relocation of Emory College to Atlanta, organization of the School of Law, construction of buildings, and adjustments necessitated by World War I. Southern Methodist University in Dallas also received much attention. From 1916 through 1926 the proposed union of the Northern and Southern Methodist churches was the subject uppermost in Candler's correspondence. Many of the letters came from opponents of unification, who were especially interested in the role suggested for blacks in the unified church and in what they perceived as Northern subjugation of the Southern church. Included are letters and reports regarding the Methodist Episcopal Church, South - Commission on Unification, of which Candler was a member. Much correspondence from 1924 to 1926 deals with his activities as chairman of the central committee of the Association to Preserve Southern Methodism by Defeating Proposed Plan of Unification. This group led the successful fight against ratification of the plan in the annual conferences in opposition to the Friends of Unification directed by Bishop Edwin DuBose Mouzon (1869-1937). Correspondence from Candler's last seven years as a bishop (1927-1934) relates to a wide variety of subjects, none of which are examined as deeply as unification was in the preceding decade. These subjects include the Methodist Episcopal Church, South - General Hospital Board; relief work among Cuban missions after storm damage in spring, 1927; and relief work in flooded areas of Mississippi in summer, 1927. Much correspondence from July through November, 1928 examines the appropriate position of the Southern Methodist church in regard to prohibition and the Democratic presidential candidacy of Alfred Emanuel Smith. The subject of unification recurs sporadically between 1929 and 1938. Charges against Bishop James Cannon (1864- ) for his alleged gambling with stock investments, inappropriate political involvement, and personal liaisons provided a topic of much correspondence from July, 1929 through December, 1931 and in April, 1934. A number of other letters deal with Candler's efforts to raise funds for repairing the church in Oxford, Georgia (1932-1933). Correspondence following his retirement contains little of particular interest. The family correspondence, which is interfiled chronologically with the general correspondence, includes many exchanges of letters between Warren and Nettie Candler when his travels separated them. These begin with thirteen letters that Nettie Curtright wrote to Warren during their courtship (June-November, 1877). In these letters Nettie discusses her attitudes toward marriage and the education of women, including her studies at LaGrange College. There are also a number of letters from Nettie to her mother commenting on her marriage and routine household and social activities. The family correspondence includes condolences on the deaths of the Candlers' infant sons Warren (1888) and Emory (1894). Several letters to Warren Candler from his youngest son Samuel Charles mention his wartime army service in France (October, 1918) and Germany (January, 1919). In addition, there are numerous letters criticizing Asa Griggs Candler's plan to marry a Catholic divorcee as his second wife (September-October, 1922). Personal correspondence also relates to Warren Candler's seventieth and seventy-fifth birthday celebrations (1927, 1932), fiftieth wedding anniversary (1927), loss of his brother Asa (1929), recognition as First Citizen of Atlanta (1933), and retirement (1934). The personal correspondence concludes with condolences on the deaths of Warren Candler (1941) and Nettie Candler (1943). Prominent family members whose correspondence is represented in the collection include Asa Griggs Candler, Charles Howard Candler, Charles Murphey Candler, Ezekiel Samuel Candler, John Slaughter Candler, Milton Anthony Candler, Samuel Charles Candler, Walter Turner Candler, Florence Candler Harris, and Andrew Sledd. Other prominent correspondents include: Emma Abbott, William Charles Adamson, William Newman Ainsworth, Young John Allen, Myrta Lockett Avary; Augustus Octavius Bacon, Alben William Barkley, William Benjamin Beauchamp, William Melvin Bell, Hiram Abiff Boaz, Charles Henry Brent, Marion Luther Brittain, William Jennings Bryan; James Cannon, Alexander Stephens Clay, Andrew Jackson Cobb, Harvey Warren Cox, Charles Robert Crisp, William George Etler Cunnyngham; Josephus Daniels, Urban Valentine William Darlington, Collins Denny, James Edward Dickey, Capers Dickson, Hoyt McWhorter Dobbs, Charles Edward Dowman, Horace Mellard DuBose; Harry Stillwell Edwards, Clement Anselm Evans; Rebecca Latimer Felton, Oscar Penn Fitzgerald, Tomlinson Fort, Benjamin Wynn Fortson, Henry H. Fout; Charles Betts Galloway, Walter Franklin George, Carter Glass, Thomas Kearney Glenn, Wilbur Fiske Glenn, Edgar Johnson Goodspeed, John Brown Gordon, John Temple Graves; Corra May White Harris, Henry Harris, Lundy Howard Harris, Nathaniel Edwin Harris, William Albinus Harris, Pat Harrison, Joseph Crane Hartzell, Samuel Ross Hay, Atticus Greene Haygood, Hiram Warner Hill, Hamilton Holt, Isaac Stiles Hopkins, Clark Howell, Dudley Mays Hughes; Samuel Martin Inman; Edgar Hutchinson Johnson, Samuel Porter Jones; John Christian Keener, Joseph Staunton Key, John Carlisle Kilgo, Lucian Lamar Knight; Andrew Jackson Lamar, Walter Russell Lambuth, Marion Elias Lazenby, Ivy Lee Ledbetter, William Presley Lovejoy, William Cuyler Lovett; William Fletcher McMurry; Earle Bradford Mayfield, Robert Abner Meek, Wightman Fletcher Melton, Robert Cotter Mizell, Arthur James Moore, John Monroe Moore, Henry Clay Morrison, Edwin DuBose Mouzon, Anthony Moultrie Muckenfuss; George Mountrie Napier, Louis DeVotie Newton, Thomas Manson Norwood; Howard Washington Odum, Lee Slater Overman; Robert Emory Park, Mansfield Theodore Peed, Angus Perkerson, Ulrich Bonnell Phillips, William Washington Pinson, Clare Purcell; William Fletcher Quillian; Joseph Eugene Ransdell, Syngman Rhee, Charles Elmer Rice, Ernest Gladstone Richardson, Henry Wade Rogers, Daniel Calhoun Roper, Dunbar Rowland; Charles Claude Selecman, George Samuel Sexton, Sam White Small, Alexander Coke Smith, Alfred Franklin Smith, Charles Alphonso Smith, George Gilman Smith, Hoke Smith, Jack J. Spalding, Leslie Jasper Steele, Harlan Fiske Stone, William Sulzer, Willis Anderson Sutton; Samuel Tate, John Telford, Joseph Merriwether Terrell, Maurice Thompson, William Danner Thompson, John James Tigert, H.M. Turner; William David Upshaw; Henry Van Dyke; Seth Ward, Frances Elizabeth Willard, Alpheus Waters Wilson, Augusta Jane Evans Wilson, James Edgar Wilson, William Lyne Wilson, Woodrow Wilson, George Winship, Comer McDonald Woodward; George Wesley Yarbrough, and Tchi Ho Yun.
Box Folder Content
1 1-20 1846-1888 (including 1 of Haygood/Candler correspondence, 1888-1895)
2 1-19 1889 January - 1894 December
3 1-18 1895 January - 1898 May 17
4 1-17 1898 May 18 - 1899 August
5 1-19 1899 August - 1902 May
6 1-21 1902 June - 1906 January
7 1-20 1906 February- 1908 July
8 1-20 1908 August-1910 June 29
9 1-20 1910 July-1912 February
10 1-19 1912 March-1913 May
11 1-18 1913 June- 1913 December 20
12 1-14 1913 December 21 - 1914 July 6
13 1-14 1914 July7- 1914 September 8
14 1-16 1914 September -1915 January
15 1-15 1915 February - 1915 June 18
16 1-15 1915 June 19 - 1915 October 15
17 1-14 1915 October 16 - 1916 March
18 1-15 1916 April - 1916 August
19 1-15 1916 September - 1917 April 21
20 1-16 1917 April 23 - 1917 October 8
21 1-18 1917 October 9 - 1918 May 29
22 1-16 1918 May 30 - 1918 December
23 1-17 1919 January- 1920 February
24 1-17 1920 March - 1921 April
25 1-16 1921 May - 1922 June 16
26 1-18 1922 June 16 - 1923 October
27 1-16 1923 November - 1924 July
28 1-17 1924 August - 1924 December
29 1-16 1925 January - 1925 March 9
30 1-14 1925 March 9 - 1925 April 27
31 1-15 1925 April 28 - 1925 June 30
32 1-15 1925 July - 1925 September
33 1-14 1925 October - 1926 March 23
34 1-19 1926 March 24 - 1927 June 9
35 1-17 1927 June 10 - 1927 December
36 1-17 1928 January - 1928 July 24
37 1-16 1928 July 25 - 1929 March 14
38 1-18 1929 March 15 - 1929 October 15
39 1-20 1929 October 16 - 1931 February
40 1-22 1931 March - 1933 December
41 1-18 1934 January - 1938 April 29
42 1-9 1938 May 8 - 1946 and undated
Family and Miscellaneous, no date
42 10 Warren Akin Candler to Sarah Antoinette Candler, no date
42 11 Sarah Antoinette Candler to Warren Akin Candler, no date
42 12 Sarah Antoinette Candler to her mother, brother, and sister, no date
42 13 Miscellaneous family letters, no date
42 14 Emory University, no date
42 15 Missions, no date
42 16 Publishing House Case, no date
42 17 Washington Representative Church, no date
42 18-20 Undated and fragments
43 1-7 Undated
Letterbooks
BV1 1889-1893

Volume also includes letters from 1895.

BV2 1894-1895
v1.11.0-dev