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COMMUNITY COUNCIL OF THE ATLANTA AREA.
Community Council of the Atlanta Area records, 1960-1974

Emory University

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/8z4rn

Collection Stored Off-Site

All or portions of this collection are housed off-site. Materials can still be requested but researchers should expect a delay of up to two business days for retrieval.


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Community Council of the Atlanta Area.
Title: Community Council of the Atlanta Area records, 1960-1974
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 570
Extent: 23 linear feet (57 boxes), 1 oversized papers box (OP), and 1 audio record (CLP)
Abstract:Records of the social planning agency Community Council of the Atlanta Area, including administrative records, committee files, printed material, program records, reading files, and subject files.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Special restrictions apply: Collection stored off-site. Researchers must contact Rose Library in advance to access this collection.

Due to privacy concerns, some materials in the collection have been redacted.

Researchers must contact Rose Library at least two weeks in advance for access to audiovisual material. Collection restrictions, copyright limitations, or technical complications may hinder Rose Library's ability to provide access to audiovisual material.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Source

Gift, 1978

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], Community Council of the Atlanta Area records, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Arranged and described at the folder level by Kristin Morgan, April 2016.


Collection Description

Historical Note

The Community Council of the Atlanta Area (CCAA) was formed on May 12, 1960 and disbanded in March of 1974. The organization was a private, non-profit social planning agency providing technical assistance and information to public and private human service agencies, businesses, civic groups, and individuals to evaluate existing human service programs and to develop new programs in the Atlanta area (Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, Fulton, and Gwinnett counties). The CCAA also disseminated information on urban planning, welfare, and human services legislation to the public and served as a consultant to local and state government, local and state human service organizations, hospitals, and schools, including the City of Atlanta, Atlanta-Fulton County Economic Opportunity Authority, Emory University Hospital, and Atlanta Public Schools.

The CCAA opened a community center in December 1969 as a response to tensions between residents of Midtown and local police. Local community members staffed the center and connected area residents with counseling, job placement, and housing services. The CCAA cofounded Volunteer Atlanta with the Community Chest, the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce, and the Junior League of Atlanta in 1970, and provided administrative services such as accounting for the organization. CCAA's research and information dissemination functions developed into a public reference library, the Information Center, by 1972. They collaborated for one year with the Atlanta-Fulton Public Library and employed one librarian, Ollye Golden, from 1971-1972. In September 1973, Executive Director Duane W. Beck entered Emory University's Ph.D. program in Sociology while maintaining his position with the CCAA. At the same time, the CCAA attempted to establish a human services scholar first at Georgia State University and then at Emory University as a hybrid academic-activist position. By January 1974, the proposal had transformed into a specific position for Duane W. Beck to continue pursuing a Ph.D. at Emory University while serving as a social planning consultant with the University's Center for Research in Social Change and other entities as requested. The CCAA disbanded in March 1974 after several years of debate on its role and in light of reduced federal funding to social service organizations. Some of the CCAA's programs continued after it closed and became independent non-profits or joined other organizations. The 24-Hour Child Care Project and the Research Evaluation Center each incorporated and became independent non-profit organizations, and the Information and Referral Service became a part of the United Way of Metropolitan Atlanta.

The Community Council of the Atlanta Area (CCAA) was formed on May 12, 1960 and disbanded in March of 1974. The organization was a private, non-profit social planning agency providing technical assistance and information to public and private human service agencies, businesses, civic groups, and individuals to evaluate existing human service programs and to develop new programs in the Atlanta area (Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, Fulton, and Gwinnett counties). The CCAA also disseminated information on urban planning, welfare, and human services legislation to the public and served as a consultant to local and state government, local and state human service organizations, hospitals, and schools, including the City of Atlanta, Atlanta-Fulton County Economic Opportunity Authority, Emory University Hospital, and Atlanta Public Schools.

The CCAA opened a community center in December 1969 as a response to tensions between residents of Midtown and local police. Local community members staffed the center and connected area residents with counseling, job placement, and housing services. The CCAA cofounded Volunteer Atlanta with the Community Chest, the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce, and the Junior League of Atlanta in 1970, and provided administrative services such as accounting for the organization. CCAA's research and information dissemination functions developed into a public reference library, the Information Center, by 1972. They collaborated for one year with the Atlanta-Fulton Public Library and employed one librarian, Ollye Golden, from 1971-1972. In September 1973, Executive Director Duane W. Beck entered Emory University's Ph.D. program in Sociology while maintaining his position with the CCAA. At the same time, the CCAA attempted to establish a human services scholar first at Georgia State University and then at Emory University as a hybrid academic-activist position. By January 1974, the proposal had transformed into a specific position for Duane W. Beck to continue pursuing a Ph.D. at Emory University while serving as a social planning consultant with the University's Center for Research in Social Change and other entities as requested. The CCAA disbanded in March 1974 after several years of debate on its role and in light of reduced federal funding to social service organizations. Some of the CCAA's programs continued after it closed and became independent non-profits or joined other organizations. The 24-Hour Child Care Project and the Research Evaluation Center each incorporated and became independent non-profit organizations, and the Information and Referral Service became a part of the United Way of Metropolitan Atlanta.

Scope and Content Note

The collection consists of the records of the Community Council of the Atlanta Area (CCAA) from 1960-1974. It includes administrative records, committee files, printed materials and sound recordings, program records, reading files, and subject files. The records document the CCAA's work to mitigate poverty and drug and alcohol abuse; to improve daycare, health, recreation, employment, and housing; and to consolidate services for the elderly in the Atlanta area. Records also document the CCAA's involvement in various human service programs and its relationships to other human service organizations serving Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, Fulton, and Gwinnett counties.

Administrative records consist of correspondence, Board of Directors and Executive Committee minutes, financial records, organizational charts, and work programs, which are annual strategic plans that the CCAA used to prioritize and administer each year's activities. Work programs include annual organization-wide objectives and goals and a high-level plan to achieve them as well as program-specific annual objectives, goals, and plans. The bulk of administrative records are collocated, but similar materials appear throughout the collection in accordance with original order. Committee files consist of minutes and reports by the general administrative committees of the CCAA, as well as those committees overseen by the Permanent Conference. Permanent Conference committees were comprised of CCAA staff and representatives from external organizations and evaluated the extent of broad social problems, as well as means to address these issues.

Printed materials and sound recordings consist of published works written by, about, relating to, and of interest to the CCAA and include reports, newsletters, newspaper clippings, marketing materials, and conference proceedings. This series also includes a sound recording of interest to the CCAA. Program records consist of proposals, grant applications, reports, committee files, correspondence, and other documentation pertaining to specific programs advised, created, or reviewed by the CCAA, including the Child Development Project and its precursor programs, the Atlanta Area-Wide Model on Aging, and the Information and Referral program. Reading files consist of reference materials circulated amongst the staff of the CCAA and are comprised of correspondence relating to the organization's programs and business operations as well as relevant newspaper clippings, notes, and reports. Subject files document topics of interest to the CCAA, including legislation, individuals, and organizations. These files contain correspondence, printed material, and notes on subjects including federal funding for social service organizations, national trends in social services, organizations such as the Community Chest and United Way, and individuals such as CCAA staff members Duane W. Beck and William H. Clark.

Arrangement Note

Organized into six series: (1) Administrative records, (2) Committee files, (3) Printed materials and sound recordings, (4) Program records, (5) Reading files, and (6) Subject files.


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Description of Series

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