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COX, HARVEY WARREN, 1875-1944.
Harvey Warren Cox papers, 1865-1961 (bulk 1920-1942)

Emory University

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/8z56j


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Cox, Harvey Warren, 1875-1944.
Title: Harvey Warren Cox papers, 1865-1961 (bulk 1920-1942)
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 38
Extent: 2.5 linear feet (5 boxes) and 1 oversized papers box and 1 oversized papers folder (OP))
Abstract:Papers of Harvey Warren Cox, president and chancellor of Emory University.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on access

Unrestricted access.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Related Materials in This Repository

Related materials in this department include official university and student publications cataloged in the Emory University Archives; the papers of Cox's predecessors, Warren Akin Candler and James Edward Dickey; the papers of his successor, Goodrich Cook White, and the papers of Robert Fleming Whitaker and Robert Cotter Mizell, members of Cox's staff.

Source

Gift, 1973, with subsequent additions.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], Harvey Warren Cox papers, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Processed by VJHC, 1983.


Collection Description

Biographical Note

Harvey Warren Cox (February 19, 1875-July 27, 1944) president and chancellor of Emory University was born in Birmingham, Illinois. His parents were Salisa Richardson Cox and Christopher Columbus Cox (b. 1847 in Schuyler County, Illinois), who served the Union Army in the Illinois Infantry, 34th Regiment, Company H. Cox married Daisy Esther Frisbie (d. September 5, 1960) of Red Cloud, Nebraska, on August 26, 1903. Their children were Warren Edward Cox, Ruth Esther Cox (Mrs. John Edward Lantz), and Albert Frisbie Cox.

Cox received the B.Ph. at Nebraska Wesleyan University (1902), the M.A. at the University of Nebraska (1906), and a second M.A. (1910) and the Ph.D. (1911) at Harvard University. His dissertation was entitled, "The Rise of the Motor Theory of Consciousness." Later in his career, honorary degrees were awarded to Cox from Emory University, the University of Florida, Birmingham Southern College, and Boston University.

From 1902 to 1909, Cox was professor of philosophy at Nebraska Wesleyan University. Accepting a position as professor of philosophy at the University of Florida in 1911, Cox served in that capacity until 1920 and also acted as dean of the University of Florida's Teachers College from 1916 to 1920. During World War I, Cox was District Supervisor of the Student Army Training Corps in the southeast.

Cox was elected president of Emory University in 1920. He was the thirteenth president of Emory College and the first president of the new Emory University, which had been organized in 1915 after a dispute concerning control of Vanderbilt University by the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. The new university had been governed since 1915 by Chancellor Warren Akin Candler and by Acting President and Acting Chancellor Franklin Nutting Parker. After the retirement of Chancellor Candler in 1922, President Cox also held briefly the title of Acting Chancellor.

During Cox's presidency, substantial increases were made in the University's enrollment, physical facilities, and financial resources. Cox led Emory through the Depression years and into an era of even greater changes during and after World War II. Outside grants to support Emory's educational program were received, Emory was recognized by the American Association of University Professors, the Gamma Chapter of Georgia of Phi Beta Kappa was installed at Emory in 1929, and the idea of the University Center in Georgia was born. The graduate school and business school (both established in 1919) grew rapidly, two junior college programs were established (Valdosta, 1928, and Oxford, 1929) and a library school (established in 1905, independent of college or university affiliation, as the Carnegie Library School) was incorporated into the University. Cox presided over the celebration in December, 1936 of the centennial of the founding of Emory College in December, 1836.

Cox retired as president in 1942, and was then named Chancellor of the University. He was succeeded as president by Goodrich Cook White, former student, professor, dean, and vice-president of Emory. Cox and White were inaugurated as chancellor and president respectively in 1942.

In addition to his activities in the field of education, Cox was a leader in the Methodist Church. He served as a deacon; as a lay leader of the North Georgia Conference; as a delegate to four quadrennial conferences of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and to the Uniting Conference of the Methodist Church in 1939; and as a member of the General Board of Education of the Methodist Church. In addition, he was vice-chairman of the Atlanta Regional Labor Board (operating under the auspices of the National Labor Board in conjunction with the National Recovery Administration) in 1934 and 1935.

Harvey Warren Cox continued as chancellor of Emory University until his death in 1944. Memorial services for him were held in Glenn Memorial Methodist Church on the Emory campus, and he was buried in the Decatur Cemetery, Decatur, Georgia. Biographical information about Harvey Warren Cox may be found in these papers, primarily in Series 2, and in the two histories of Emory University: Bullock, Henry Morton. A History of Emory University, Nashville: Parthenon Press, 1936 (XE109 B8) -and English, Thomas Hopkins. Emory University, 1915-1965: A Semicentennial History. Atlanta: Emory University, 1966.

Harvey Warren Cox (February 19, 1875-July 27, 1944) president and chancellor of Emory University was born in Birmingham, Illinois. His parents were Salisa Richardson Cox and Christopher Columbus Cox (b. 1847 in Schuyler County, Illinois), who served the Union Army in the Illinois Infantry, 34th Regiment, Company H. Cox married Daisy Esther Frisbie (d. September 5, 1960) of Red Cloud, Nebraska, on August 26, 1903. Their children were Warren Edward Cox, Ruth Esther Cox (Mrs. John Edward Lantz), and Albert Frisbie Cox.

Cox received the B.Ph. at Nebraska Wesleyan University (1902), the M.A. at the University of Nebraska (1906), and a second M.A. (1910) and the Ph.D. (1911) at Harvard University. His dissertation was entitled, "The Rise of the Motor Theory of Consciousness." Later in his career, honorary degrees were awarded to Cox from Emory University, the University of Florida, Birmingham Southern College, and Boston University.

From 1902 to 1909, Cox was professor of philosophy at Nebraska Wesleyan University. Accepting a position as professor of philosophy at the University of Florida in 1911, Cox served in that capacity until 1920 and also acted as dean of the University of Florida's Teachers College from 1916 to 1920. During World War I, Cox was District Supervisor of the Student Army Training Corps in the southeast.

Cox was elected president of Emory University in 1920. He was the thirteenth president of Emory College and the first president of the new Emory University, which had been organized in 1915 after a dispute concerning control of Vanderbilt University by the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. The new university had been governed since 1915 by Chancellor Warren Akin Candler and by Acting President and Acting Chancellor Franklin Nutting Parker. After the retirement of Chancellor Candler in 1922, President Cox also held briefly the title of Acting Chancellor.

During Cox's presidency, substantial increases were made in the University's enrollment, physical facilities, and financial resources. Cox led Emory through the Depression years and into an era of even greater changes during and after World War II. Outside grants to support Emory's educational program were received, Emory was recognized by the American Association of University Professors, the Gamma Chapter of Georgia of Phi Beta Kappa was installed at Emory in 1929, and the idea of the University Center in Georgia was born. The graduate school and business school (both established in 1919) grew rapidly, two junior college programs were established (Valdosta, 1928, and Oxford, 1929) and a library school (established in 1905, independent of college or university affiliation, as the Carnegie Library School) was incorporated into the University. Cox presided over the celebration in December, 1936 of the centennial of the founding of Emory College in December, 1836.

Cox retired as president in 1942, and was then named Chancellor of the University. He was succeeded as president by Goodrich Cook White, former student, professor, dean, and vice-president of Emory. Cox and White were inaugurated as chancellor and president respectively in 1942.

In addition to his activities in the field of education, Cox was a leader in the Methodist Church. He served as a deacon; as a lay leader of the North Georgia Conference; as a delegate to four quadrennial conferences of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and to the Uniting Conference of the Methodist Church in 1939; and as a member of the General Board of Education of the Methodist Church. In addition, he was vice-chairman of the Atlanta Regional Labor Board (operating under the auspices of the National Labor Board in conjunction with the National Recovery Administration) in 1934 and 1935.

Harvey Warren Cox continued as chancellor of Emory University until his death in 1944. Memorial services for him were held in Glenn Memorial Methodist Church on the Emory campus, and he was buried in the Decatur Cemetery, Decatur, Georgia. Biographical information about Harvey Warren Cox may be found in these papers, primarily in Series 2, and in the two histories of Emory University: Bullock, Henry Morton. A History of Emory University, Nashville: Parthenon Press, 1936 (XE109 B8) -and English, Thomas Hopkins. Emory University, 1915-1965: A Semicentennial History. Atlanta: Emory University, 1966.

Scope and Content Note

The Harvey Warren Cox papers contain correspondence, reports, speeches, printed materials, clippings, and photographs gathered from a variety of sources. The earliest items in the collection (1865-1880) relate to the Civil War service of Cox's father, while the heaviest concentration of material centers around Cox's presidency of Emory University (1920-1942). A few items in the collection date from after Cox's death in 1944 and concern the launching of the Emory Victory, sponsored by Cox's daughter-in-law (1945, 1952), and the dedication of Cox Hall, the food services building on the Emory University campus (1961).

These papers do not represent the archival records of the administration of Cox as president of Emory, nor do they present a complete picture of Cox's life. The very early family items were donated by descendants of Harvey Warren Cox. Much of the Emory-related material and some of the personal and Labor Board papers were gathered in the library during and after Cox's presidency; the details of the provenance of most of these items before their accumulation in the library is unclear. Thirteen items of correspondence (1931-1935) exchanged between Georgia author Corra Harris on her companion and Cox or members of his Emory staff were removed from the Warren Akin Candler Papers in this department and interfiled in Cox's Emory correspondence. Other items of correspondence exchanged between Cox and officials of the Methodist Church were removed from an artificial Methodist Leaders Collection in this department and interfiled into the Emory correspondence in this collection. Photographs, clippings, and news releases from the files of the Emory University News Bureau have also been made a part of this collection.

Correspondents include: Martha McChesney Berry, Corra May (White) Harris, Herbert Clark Hoover, John M. McCandless, Arthur James Moore, Raymond Blalock Nixon, Franklin Nutting Parke , Richard Brevard Russell, and Robert Fleming Whitaker.

Arrangement Note

Organized into three series: (1) Personal and family papers, (2) Emory University records and papers, and (3) National Labor Board papers.


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