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CRUIKSHANK, GEORGE, 1792-1878.
George Cruikshank collection, 1835-1852

Emory University

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/gs7hv


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Cruikshank, George, 1792-1878.
Title: George Cruikshank collection, 1835-1852
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 1314
Extent: .25 linear ft. (1 box and 6 oversized papers (OP))
Abstract:Collection of etchings by British caricaturist George Cruikshank published in The Comic Almanack from 1835 to 1852.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Unrestricted access.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Source

Unknown

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], George Cruikshank collection, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Processed by Michael Camp, September 2014.


Collection Description

Biographical Note

George Cruikshank, British caricaturist and illustrator, was born on September 27, 1792, in London, England. His father, Isaac Cruikshank (circa 1756-1811), was a prominent caricaturist of the 1790s, and his older brother Isaac Robert Cruikshank also took up a career in caricature and illustration. George Cruikshank began his own career as his father's apprentice, and achieved early recognition for his work with William Hone on the political satire The Political House That Jack Built (1819). Cruikshank attacked Tories, Whigs, and Radicals equally and, along with James Gillray and Thomas Rowlandson, developed the figure of John Bull as a national personification of England. He caricatured Irish rebels for William Maxwell's History of the Irish rebellion in 1798 (1845). Cruikshank also published a number of collections of his satirical caricatures, including Prince Egan's Life in London (1821), The Comic Almanack (1835-1853), and Omnibus (1842). In addition to Cruikshank's illustrations, The Comic Almanack also included literary contributions from William Makepeace Thackeray, Henry Mayhew, and others.

By 1823, Cruikshank had also begun focusing on book illustrations, providing illustrations that year for the first English translation of Grimms' Fairy Tales (published in English as German Popular Stories). Though Cruikshank illustrated approximately 850 books, his most notable projects included providing illustrations for the Charles Dickens works Sketches by Boz (136), The Mudfrog Papers (1837-1838), and Oliver Twist (1838). In December 1871, Cruikshank published a letter in the London Times claiming intellectual credit for much of the plot of Oliver Twist. In the 1840s, Cruikshank shifted attention to the growing temperance movement in Britain. Previously a heavy drinker, he supplied illustrations for the National Temperance Society and the Total Abstinence Society.

On October 16, 1827, George Cruikshank married Mary Ann Walker (1807-1849). Two years after her death, in 1851, Cruikshank married Eliza Widdiston. George Cruikshank died on February 1, 1878, in London, and was buried in Kensal Green Cemetery, but his remains were moved in November to St. Paul's Cathedral. After his death, it was revealed that Cruikshank had fathered eleven children with former servant Adelaide Attree. The British Museum and the Victoria and Albert Museum hold collections of his work.

George Cruikshank, British caricaturist and illustrator, was born on September 27, 1792, in London, England. His father, Isaac Cruikshank (circa 1756-1811), was a prominent caricaturist of the 1790s, and his older brother Isaac Robert Cruikshank also took up a career in caricature and illustration. George Cruikshank began his own career as his father's apprentice, and achieved early recognition for his work with William Hone on the political satire The Political House That Jack Built (1819). Cruikshank attacked Tories, Whigs, and Radicals equally and, along with James Gillray and Thomas Rowlandson, developed the figure of John Bull as a national personification of England. He caricatured Irish rebels for William Maxwell's History of the Irish rebellion in 1798 (1845). Cruikshank also published a number of collections of his satirical caricatures, including Prince Egan's Life in London (1821), The Comic Almanack (1835-1853), and Omnibus (1842). In addition to Cruikshank's illustrations, The Comic Almanack also included literary contributions from William Makepeace Thackeray, Henry Mayhew, and others.

By 1823, Cruikshank had also begun focusing on book illustrations, providing illustrations that year for the first English translation of Grimms' Fairy Tales (published in English as German Popular Stories). Though Cruikshank illustrated approximately 850 books, his most notable projects included providing illustrations for the Charles Dickens works Sketches by Boz (136), The Mudfrog Papers (1837-1838), and Oliver Twist (1838). In December 1871, Cruikshank published a letter in the London Times claiming intellectual credit for much of the plot of Oliver Twist. In the 1840s, Cruikshank shifted attention to the growing temperance movement in Britain. Previously a heavy drinker, he supplied illustrations for the National Temperance Society and the Total Abstinence Society.

On October 16, 1827, George Cruikshank married Mary Ann Walker (1807-1849). Two years after her death, in 1851, Cruikshank married Eliza Widdiston. George Cruikshank died on February 1, 1878, in London, and was buried in Kensal Green Cemetery, but his remains were moved in November to St. Paul's Cathedral. After his death, it was revealed that Cruikshank had fathered eleven children with former servant Adelaide Attree. The British Museum and the Victoria and Albert Museum hold collections of his work.

Scope and Content Note

This collection consists of etchings by George Cruikshank published in The Comic Almanack and produced by David Bogue of London from 1835 to 1852 includes Victorian humorous prose as well as a cartoon for each month of the year. The work, subtitled, An Ephemeris in Jest and Earnest, containing All Things Fitting for Such a Work, included distinguished literary contributors such as William Makepeace Thackeray and Henry Mayhew.

Arrangement Note

Arranged in chronological order.


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Container List

Box Folder Content
OP1 - Etchings, The Comic Almanack, 1835-1836
OP2 - Etchings, The Comic Almanack, 1838-1839
1 1 Etchings, The Comic Almanack, 1839
1 2 Etchings, The Comic Almanack, 1840
OP3 - Etchings, The Comic Almanack, 1841-1843
OP4 - Etchings, The Comic Almanack, 1844-1846
OP5 - Etchings, The Comic Almanack, 1847-1848
OP6 - Etchings, The Comic Almanack, 1850-1852
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