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DUGAN, ALAN.
Alan Dugan papers, 1861-2003

Emory University

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/bcm27


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Dugan, Alan.
Title: Alan Dugan papers, 1861-2003
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 1188
Extent: 27.25 linear feet (55 boxes), 2 oversized papers boxes and 2 oversized papers folders (OP), 1 bound volume (BV), and AV Masters: .25 linear feet (1 box)
Abstract:Papers of poet Alan Dugan, including correspondence, personal and professional papers, writings, printed material, photographs, and audiovisual material documenting his career as a writer and educator.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Special restrictions apply: Use copies have not been made for audiovisual material in this collection. Researchers must contact the Rose Library at least two weeks in advance for access to these items. Collection restrictions, copyright limitations, or technical complications may hinder the Rose Library's ability to provide access to audiovisual material

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Source

Purchase, 2011.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], Alan Dugan papers, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Processed by Laura Starratt, Michael Camp, and Faizat Badmus-Busari, May 2015.


Collection Description

Biographical Note

Poet and educator Alan Dugan (1923-2003) was born on February 12, 1923 in Brooklyn, New York, to Elmer and Mae Dugan and attended Jamaica High School in Queens, New York. There, he worked on the student newspaper, ran for Clubs Committee, and was a member of the honor society, Arista. He began his undergraduate education at Queens College in New York in 1941, but was drafted into the army two years later and served during World War II in the United States Army Air Forces. Dugan attended Olivet College in Olivet, Michigan, on the GI Bill after the war and met artist Judith Shahn while there. Dugan and Shahn left Olivet during a student strike over the firing of a left-wing faculty member they supported and relocated to Mexico where Dugan returned to college and earned a Bachelor of Arts in English from Mexico City College in 1949. For the next ten years, Dugan lived in New York City and worked in sales and publishing, along with odd jobs such as model maker for a medical supply company, while attempting to establish a career as a poet. Dugan won his first award in 1946, from Poetry Magazine. Dugan was awarded the Rome Fellowship from the American Academy Arts and Letters and traveled to Rome in 1962. Dugan and Shahn married while living in Manhattan, and ran a greeting card company with another couple, the Komars, which went bankrupt in 1957

Upon establishing a creative writing career, Dugan taught at Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, New York, from 1967-1971. In 1971, Dugan and Shahn moved to Cape Cod, and Dugan began teaching creative writing courses at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown where he was a mentor to younger poets. He also worked with the Massachusetts Poetry in the Schools program from 1971-1974, traveling to local elementary, middle, and high schools to teach poetry. Dugan and Shahn used Guggenheim and Rockefeller fellowships awarded to Dugan to travel and work in Paris, Rome, and South America.

Dugan published his poetry in a number of volumes, including Poems (1961), Poems 2 (1963), Poems 3 (1967), Poems 4 (1974), Poems 5 (1983), Poems 6 (1989), and Poems 7 (2001). Poems Seven: New and Complete Poetry, a compilation of all seven of these collections, was released in 2001. Dugan's poetry includes mediations on the mundane aspects of daily life and often employs slang and scatological terminology. Poems received the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award, and Poems Seven received another National Book Award. In 1982, the Poetry Society of America awarded Dugan the Shelley Memorial Award. Alan Dugan died of pneumonia in September 2003 in Hyannis, Massachusetts.

Poet and educator Alan Dugan (1923-2003) was born on February 12, 1923 in Brooklyn, New York, to Elmer and Mae Dugan and attended Jamaica High School in Queens, New York. There, he worked on the student newspaper, ran for Clubs Committee, and was a member of the honor society, Arista. He began his undergraduate education at Queens College in New York in 1941, but was drafted into the army two years later and served during World War II in the United States Army Air Forces. Dugan attended Olivet College in Olivet, Michigan, on the GI Bill after the war and met artist Judith Shahn while there. Dugan and Shahn left Olivet during a student strike over the firing of a left-wing faculty member they supported and relocated to Mexico where Dugan returned to college and earned a Bachelor of Arts in English from Mexico City College in 1949. For the next ten years, Dugan lived in New York City and worked in sales and publishing, along with odd jobs such as model maker for a medical supply company, while attempting to establish a career as a poet. Dugan won his first award in 1946, from Poetry Magazine. Dugan was awarded the Rome Fellowship from the American Academy Arts and Letters and traveled to Rome in 1962. Dugan and Shahn married while living in Manhattan, and ran a greeting card company with another couple, the Komars, which went bankrupt in 1957

Upon establishing a creative writing career, Dugan taught at Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, New York, from 1967-1971. In 1971, Dugan and Shahn moved to Cape Cod, and Dugan began teaching creative writing courses at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown where he was a mentor to younger poets. He also worked with the Massachusetts Poetry in the Schools program from 1971-1974, traveling to local elementary, middle, and high schools to teach poetry. Dugan and Shahn used Guggenheim and Rockefeller fellowships awarded to Dugan to travel and work in Paris, Rome, and South America.

Dugan published his poetry in a number of volumes, including Poems (1961), Poems 2 (1963), Poems 3 (1967), Poems 4 (1974), Poems 5 (1983), Poems 6 (1989), and Poems 7 (2001). Poems Seven: New and Complete Poetry, a compilation of all seven of these collections, was released in 2001. Dugan's poetry includes mediations on the mundane aspects of daily life and often employs slang and scatological terminology. Poems received the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award, and Poems Seven received another National Book Award. In 1982, the Poetry Society of America awarded Dugan the Shelley Memorial Award. Alan Dugan died of pneumonia in September 2003 in Hyannis, Massachusetts.

Scope and Content Note

The collection consists of the papers of Alan Dugan from 1861-2010It includes correspondence, personal papers, professional papers, writings, printed material, photographs, and audiovisual material. Correspondence includes both personal and professional correspondence of Alan and Judith (Shahn) Dugan. Personal correspondents include Mae, Dugan's mother, while professional correspondents include American poets Frank Stanford and Yusef Komunyakaa along with other former students. Also included are letters between Dugan's publishers, Yale University Press and Antaeus: The Ecco Press, and materials documenting awards, recommendations, and application letters. Personal and professional papers include work on projects such as Massachusetts Poetry in the Schools and the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown as well as financial records and awards. Personal papers contain resumes, degrees, military records, and memorials.

Writings include work by Alan Dugan and others. Writings by Dugan consist of handwritten and typescript drafts of individual poems, along with manuscript drafts and page proofs of his published collections. Writings by others contain handwritten and typescript drafts of amateur and professional writers including Maya Angelou and Jeffrey Eugenides as well as Walter E. Doerfler's artistic work "From the Life, Times and Newsleeks of A. Port'eous Lighthead,". Many of the poems by amateur writers include correspondence to Dugan asking him or thanking him for comment on their work. There is a large amount of material from the Castle Hill Poetry Workshop at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, Massachusetts, where Dugan taught classes in creative writing. The printed material consists of published material documenting Dugan's life and career, including promotional material, published writings, newspaper and magazine clippings, and newsletters and magazines. There are a large amount of clippings from the early 1960s documenting Dugan's reception of the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award.

Photographs include those collected by Alan and Judith Dugan from 1860s-2003, and primarily contain publicity photographs of Alan Dugan along with other snapshots of Alan and Judith as well as of former classmates, family, and friends. Unidentified pictures include snapshots of possible family members in Florida in the 1960s; an unidentified wedding from the 1940s; and two tintypes, circa 1860. There are two scrapbooks in the series: one created by Mae Dugan about Alan, and the other entitled "Mexican Border" with photographs of soldiers from 1916. Audiovisual materials consists of recordings of Alan Dugan including five open reel tapes and three audio cassettes.

Arrangement Note

Organized into 6 series: (1) Writings, (2) Correspondence, (3) Professional and personal papers, (4) Printed materials, (5) Photographs, and (6) Audiovisual materials.


Selected Search Terms

Personal Names

Topical Terms

Geographic Names

Form/Genre Terms


Description of Series

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