EDMISTON, ALTHEA BROWN, 1874-1937.
Althea Brown Edmiston papers, 1918-1981

Emory University

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/8z815

Collection Stored Off-Site

All or portions of this collection are housed off-site. Materials can still be requested but researchers should expect a delay of up to two business days for retrieval.


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Edmiston, Althea Brown, 1874-1937.
Title: Althea Brown Edmiston papers, 1918-1981
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 883
Extent: .5 linear ft. (1 box)
Abstract:Personal papers of Althea Brown Edmiston, an African American missionary to Africa, including missionary materials, Sunday School materials printed in Africa, hymnals, and other printed material.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Special restrictions apply: Collection stored off-site. Researchers must contact the Rose Library in advance to access this collection.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Source

Purchase, 2001.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], Althea Brown Edmiston papers, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Processed by the Rose Library students


Collection Description

Biographical Note

Althea Brown Edmiston (1874-1937), African American missionary to Africa, was the daughter of Robert and Molly Suggs Brown of Russelville, Alabama. In 1876 the family moved to Rolling Fork, Mississippi. In the fall of 1892, she left Mississippi to study at Fisk University for the next nine years. After graduating from Fisk, she applied to be a missionary in the American Presbyterian Congo Mission and left for Africa in August 1902. In the Congo, she was made mistress of the Maria Carey Home for Girls, a day school in Ibanche. She survived the destruction of the mission at Ibanche during the Bakuba uprisings in the Congo in 1904. Fleeing to Luebo, she met and later married Reverend Alonzo L. Edmiston on July 8, 1905. They had two children Sherman Lucius Edmiston (b. 1906) and Alonzo Leaucourt Edmiston (b. 1913). The Edmistons made their home at the newly rebuilt village of Ibanche. In 1906 she returned to America because their child had become ill, her husband joined her a year later and they settled in Tuscaloosa, Alabama until 1911. After raising enough money, they returned to Africa, but left their son in America. He too became ill, so she took him to America and left both children with relatives so that she could return to her mission work. They came back to America in 1920 to raise money for the mission and returned to Africa in 1921, taking their children with them. Althea Brown Edmiston wrote the first dictionary of the Bakuba language. She died in 1937 in Africa of sleeping sickness and malaria.

Althea Brown Edmiston (1874-1937), African American missionary to Africa, was the daughter of Robert and Molly Suggs Brown of Russelville, Alabama. In 1876 the family moved to Rolling Fork, Mississippi. In the fall of 1892, she left Mississippi to study at Fisk University for the next nine years. After graduating from Fisk, she applied to be a missionary in the American Presbyterian Congo Mission and left for Africa in August 1902. In the Congo, she was made mistress of the Maria Carey Home for Girls, a day school in Ibanche. She survived the destruction of the mission at Ibanche during the Bakuba uprisings in the Congo in 1904. Fleeing to Luebo, she met and later married Reverend Alonzo L. Edmiston on July 8, 1905. They had two children Sherman Lucius Edmiston (b. 1906) and Alonzo Leaucourt Edmiston (b. 1913). The Edmistons made their home at the newly rebuilt village of Ibanche. In 1906 she returned to America because their child had become ill, her husband joined her a year later and they settled in Tuscaloosa, Alabama until 1911. After raising enough money, they returned to Africa, but left their son in America. He too became ill, so she took him to America and left both children with relatives so that she could return to her mission work. They came back to America in 1920 to raise money for the mission and returned to Africa in 1921, taking their children with them. Althea Brown Edmiston wrote the first dictionary of the Bakuba language. She died in 1937 in Africa of sleeping sickness and malaria.

Scope and Content Note

The collection contains the personal papers of Althea Brown Edmiston. The papers include Presbyterian conference materials, missionary newspapers, Sunday School materials printed in Africa, hymnals, and other printed material.

Arrangement Note

Unprocessed collection.


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Container List

Box Folder Content
1 1 Biographical information for A.L. Edmiston
1 2 Correspondence
1 3 Notebook: Bible in Bukuba language
1 4 Notebook: Sermons
1 5 Notebook: School work
1 6 Photographs
1 7 Printed Material: Church Envelopes
1 8 Printed Material: Congo Mission News, fragmented
1 9 Printed Material: Congo Proverb Calendar, 1924
1 10 Printed Material: Hudson High
1 11 Printed Material: Hartshorn COllege, Virginia, 1919-1920, 1927
1 12 Scrapbook of Newspaper Clippings, fragmented
1 13 Student Handbook, Howard University, 1911-1912
1 14 Printed Material: "Negro and White" by JOhn R. Rice, 1956
1 15 Newspaper Clippings
1 16 Sheet Music, 2 items
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