EMORY UNIVERSITY. GLEE CLUB
Emory University Glee Club records, 1918-1986

Emory University

Emory University Archives

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/bn81m


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Emory University. Glee Club
Title: Emory University Glee Club records, 1918-1986
Call Number:Series No. 8
Extent: 5.25 linear ft. (10 boxes) and 65 bound volumes (BV), 2 oversize paper folders (OP), and 3 extra-oversized paper folders (XOP)
Abstract:The collection contains the records of the Emory University Glee Club and includes correspondence, performance programs, subject files, clippings, scrapbooks, and audiovisual materials.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Special restrictions apply: Researchers must contact MARBL in advance to access audiovisual materials in this collection.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Separated Material

Some Emory University Glee Club materials can be found in Emory University Musical Activities and Organizations collection (Series 67)

Related Materials in This Repository

Recordings of the Emory University Glee Club can be found in the Teaching Aids Department audiovisual materials (Series 210)

Source

Transfer.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], Emory University Glee Club records, Emory University Archives, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.


Collection Description

Administrative History

The Emory Glee Club was started by students on the campus of Emory College in Oxford, Ga. in the few years prior to the expansion of the college into Emory University in 1915. Malcolm H. Dewey, who eventually organized and chaired the Department of Fine Arts at Emory University, became director of the Glee Club in 1920 and is credited with the Club's success from the 1920s to the 1950s. The Glee Club performed throughout Georgia, and gradually expanded their geographic reach to include most of the South in subsequent years. The 1922-1923 tour included a stop in Havana, Cuba and the 1924-1925 included a performance for President Calvin Coolidge in Washington, DC. The Glee Club made their first European tour in the 1926-1927 season, playing at multiple venues in London and around the United Kingdom. In 1928, the Glee Club exanded its European tour to include performances in Paris and Amsterdam as well as the United Kingdom.

In its early years, the Glee Club secured its popularity by performing a mix of traditional and popular music, often feauring humorous arrangements and skits. For example, a "stunt night" sponsored by the Glee Club became a recurring event on campus starting in 1920. The Glee Club became particularly well known for their renditions of what traditionally were African-American spirituals endemic to the the South. Dubbed "The South's Sweetest Singers," the Club also performed a popular annual Christmas carol service in Atlanta beginning in 1924, which was based on the traditional King's College, Cambridge Christmas Eve carol service, "A Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols." In 1957, Dr. Dewey retired and William W. Lemonds succeeded him in 1963.

The Emory Glee Club was started by students on the campus of Emory College in Oxford, Ga. in the few years prior to the expansion of the college into Emory University in 1915. Malcolm H. Dewey, who eventually organized and chaired the Department of Fine Arts at Emory University, became director of the Glee Club in 1920 and is credited with the Club's success from the 1920s to the 1950s. The Glee Club performed throughout Georgia, and gradually expanded their geographic reach to include most of the South in subsequent years. The 1922-1923 tour included a stop in Havana, Cuba and the 1924-1925 included a performance for President Calvin Coolidge in Washington, DC. The Glee Club made their first European tour in the 1926-1927 season, playing at multiple venues in London and around the United Kingdom. In 1928, the Glee Club exanded its European tour to include performances in Paris and Amsterdam as well as the United Kingdom.

In its early years, the Glee Club secured its popularity by performing a mix of traditional and popular music, often feauring humorous arrangements and skits. For example, a "stunt night" sponsored by the Glee Club became a recurring event on campus starting in 1920. The Glee Club became particularly well known for their renditions of what traditionally were African-American spirituals endemic to the the South. Dubbed "The South's Sweetest Singers," the Club also performed a popular annual Christmas carol service in Atlanta beginning in 1924, which was based on the traditional King's College, Cambridge Christmas Eve carol service, "A Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols." In 1957, Dr. Dewey retired and William W. Lemonds succeeded him in 1963.

Scope and Content Note

The collection consists of correspondence, concert programs, subject files, unsorted clippings, and bound volumes documenting the Glee Club and its long-time director, Malcom Dewey. Bound volumes consist mostly of scrapbooks maintained by past directors and contain programs, photographs, correspondence, music scores, clippings, and other ephemera.

Arrangement Note

Organized into five series: (1) Correspondence, (2) Programs, (3) Subject files, (4) Clippings, and (5) Bound volumes.

Finding Aid Note

Finding aid available in the repository.


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Description of Series

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