EMORY UNIVERSITY. DEPT. OF BIOLOGY
Department of Biology records, 1930-2004

Emory University

Emory University Archives

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/bmk8f

Digital Material Available in this Collection

Collection Stored Off-Site

All or portions of this collection are housed off-site. Materials can still be requested but researchers should expect a delay of up to two business days for retrieval.


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Emory University. Dept. of Biology
Title: Department of Biology records, 1930-2004
Call Number:Series No. 93
Extent: 4.5 linear ft. (9 boxes) and
Abstract:The Department of Biology was established at Emory College in 1911, though courses in biology had been taught prior to that. The Department continued to operate the auspices of Emory University after the rechartering of the school in 1914.The collection consists chiefly of the records, 1930-1993, of the Department of Biology at Emory University. The records include administrative materials, meeting minutes, audiovisual materials, newspaper clippings, and subject files. The records also include materials related to special endeavors by Biology Department faculty such as the Emory Herbarium and the Baker Woodlands. Many materials come from Woolford Bales Baker who served as Professor from 1919-1961. Materials relating to William Dudley Burbanck's history of the Department of Biology are also contained within the collection as are materials related to Emory University's chapter of Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Special restrictions apply: Researchers must contact MARBL in advance to access audiovisual materials in this collection.

Collection stored off-site. Researchers must contact MARBL in advance to access this collection.

Source

Transfer

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], Department of Biology records, Emory University Archives, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Processed by Lisa Chinn, February 2011.


Collection Description

Administrative History

Biology courses have been part of the curriculum at Emory from its 1836 founding in Oxford, Ga. The first course offering in the biological sciences was human physiology. The biology curriculum quickly expanded as the College grew to include classes in histology and botany. Alexander Means, Emory College's fourth president, held the sciences chair at the College and was the first instructor in the sciences, teaching the school's courses in physiology, as well as in other sciences, including geology, natural philosophy, and chemistry.

Early sciences classes, as well as other college courses, were conducted in the buildings designed as dormitories for Emory's students. Classes were later relocated to "Old Main" when that building's construction was completed in 1852. When "Old Main" was condemned in 1871 and then torn down in 1872, science classes moved to Science Hall, completed in 1875. The science program at Emory expanded in the years following the Civil War and the first official professorship in biology at Emory College came in 1896 with the appointment of Reverend H.S. Bradley, Jr as Professor of Biology. In response to a growing interest in the sciences at Emory in the late 1890s, the College built the Lovick and George F. Pierce Memorial Science Hall. Completed in 1903 and named in honor of Emory trustee Lovick Pierce and his son George F. Pierce, also an Emory trustee as well as College President from 1848 to 1854, the Pierce Science Hall would be home to the new Department of Biology, established in 1911.

The biology program at Emory continued with the school's move to Atlanta and its rechristening as Emory University. Dr. Woolford Bales Baker, who served as a Professor of Biology at Emory University from 1919 to 1961, was largely responsible for the growth of the Biology Department at Emory. Baker also stressed the importance of keeping plant and animal samples on hand for research and teaching and established the Emory Herbarium. The Herbarium included specimens of plants found throughout the Southeast, with the earliest samples dating from 1939. Through his work as Professor as well as department chair, Baker established the reputation of the department and also raised awareness of the natural landscape surrounding Emory. The Baker Woodlands on the Emory campus is named for him. Nicknamed "chief forester" by his colleagues at Emory for his environmental work, Baker was instrumental in the founding the Fernbank Forest with his friend Emily Stewart Harrison. Baker's friendship with Harrison enabled him and his graduate students to conduct research on the grounds of the Fernbank Forest.

The history of Emory's Department of Biology was preserved in large part due to the efforts of William Dudley Burbanck, Professor of Biology (1949 to 1980) and department chair (1952 to 1957). During his tenure at Emory, Burbanck compiled the biographies of twelve professors he deemed integral to the success of the department, publishing the work as One Bright Shining Moment That Was Camelot II: A review of the organization and operation of the department of Biology of Emory University from 1950-1980.

Biology courses have been part of the curriculum at Emory from its 1836 founding in Oxford, Ga. The first course offering in the biological sciences was human physiology. The biology curriculum quickly expanded as the College grew to include classes in histology and botany. Alexander Means, Emory College's fourth president, held the sciences chair at the College and was the first instructor in the sciences, teaching the school's courses in physiology, as well as in other sciences, including geology, natural philosophy, and chemistry.

Early sciences classes, as well as other college courses, were conducted in the buildings designed as dormitories for Emory's students. Classes were later relocated to "Old Main" when that building's construction was completed in 1852. When "Old Main" was condemned in 1871 and then torn down in 1872, science classes moved to Science Hall, completed in 1875. The science program at Emory expanded in the years following the Civil War and the first official professorship in biology at Emory College came in 1896 with the appointment of Reverend H.S. Bradley, Jr as Professor of Biology. In response to a growing interest in the sciences at Emory in the late 1890s, the College built the Lovick and George F. Pierce Memorial Science Hall. Completed in 1903 and named in honor of Emory trustee Lovick Pierce and his son George F. Pierce, also an Emory trustee as well as College President from 1848 to 1854, the Pierce Science Hall would be home to the new Department of Biology, established in 1911.

The biology program at Emory continued with the school's move to Atlanta and its rechristening as Emory University. Dr. Woolford Bales Baker, who served as a Professor of Biology at Emory University from 1919 to 1961, was largely responsible for the growth of the Biology Department at Emory. Baker also stressed the importance of keeping plant and animal samples on hand for research and teaching and established the Emory Herbarium. The Herbarium included specimens of plants found throughout the Southeast, with the earliest samples dating from 1939. Through his work as Professor as well as department chair, Baker established the reputation of the department and also raised awareness of the natural landscape surrounding Emory. The Baker Woodlands on the Emory campus is named for him. Nicknamed "chief forester" by his colleagues at Emory for his environmental work, Baker was instrumental in the founding the Fernbank Forest with his friend Emily Stewart Harrison. Baker's friendship with Harrison enabled him and his graduate students to conduct research on the grounds of the Fernbank Forest.

The history of Emory's Department of Biology was preserved in large part due to the efforts of William Dudley Burbanck, Professor of Biology (1949 to 1980) and department chair (1952 to 1957). During his tenure at Emory, Burbanck compiled the biographies of twelve professors he deemed integral to the success of the department, publishing the work as One Bright Shining Moment That Was Camelot II: A review of the organization and operation of the department of Biology of Emory University from 1950-1980.

Scope and Content Note

The Department of Biology records are organized into six series and consist of documents dating from 1930 to 2004. The five series are Audio-Visual Materials, Administrative Materials, Herbarium, History of the Biology Department, and Sigma Xi.

The Audio-Visual Materials series, 1930 to 1980, contains photographs and video of the department's boat "The Driftwood," the Fernbank Research Center, and graduate students engaged in research. Also included are films of departmental events, such as the award ceremony in which Woolford Baker received the University's Thomas Jefferson Award for excellent scholarship.

The second series, Administrative Materials, 1949-1982, documents administrative and organizational topics including staffing, technology, the department's use of the Lullwater estate for specimen gathering, and departmental meeting minutes.

The Herbarium series, 1939-2004, includes indices of the plants housed in the Emory herbarium, as well as request letters from various institutions seeking specimen samples for their collections.

Materials in the History of the Biology Department series, 1940-1993, include newspaper clippings, subject files, and other research materials used by William Dudley Burbanck to research the history of the biology department. The series also contains a copy of Burbank's manuscript "One Bright Shining Moment That Was Camelot II: A review of the organization and operation of the department of Biology of Emory University from 1950-1980," as well as a revision that expanded the departmental history to 1993.

The Sigma Xi series, 1943-1970, documents the Sigma Xi academic honor society and includes receipts from annual dues, brochures from the annual meeting, and induction certificates.

The Web archives series contains the captured and preserved web site of the Department of Biology available to browse via the Web Archiving Service of the California Digital Library.

Arrangement Note

Organized into six series: (1) Audiovisual material, (2) Administrative materials, (3) Herbarium, (4) History of the Biology Department, (5) Sigma Xi, adn (6) Web archives.


Selected Search Terms

Personal Names

Corporate Names

Topical Terms

Form/Genre Terms


Description of Series

v1.11.0-dev