YOUNG, JAMES HARVEY.
James Harvey Young papers, 1893-2004

Emory University

Emory University Archives

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/c9d2h

Collection Stored Off-Site

All or portions of this collection are housed off-site. Materials can still be requested but researchers should expect a delay of up to two business days for retrieval.


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Young, James Harvey.
Title: James Harvey Young papers, 1893-2004
Call Number:Series No. 97
Extent: 102.75 linear ft. (170 boxes), 1 bound volume (BV)
Abstract:James Harvey Young was a professor of history at Emory University and social historian of patent medicine and food and drug regulation in America. Papers are comprised primarily of materials related to Young's faculty appointment at Emory University and his research on food and drug regulation, the Food and Drug Administration, medical quackery, patent medicine, and other topics. There is also personal and professional correspondence, publication manuscripts, printed materials, and audiovisual recordings. The collection also includes correspondence and genealogical material of the Young family including Blanche DeBra Young, James Young, and W. Harvey Young.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Special restrictions apply: Materials in Series 1.5 are closed to researchers in accordance with Emory University Archives access policy for student records and personnel files. Additionally, researchers must contact Rose Library in advance to access audiovisual materials in this collection. Collection stored off-site.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Source

Transferred, 2005 (Acc. 2005-10-31).

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], James Harvey Young papers, Emory University Archives, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Processed by Ryan Taylor, 2012.


Collection Description

Biographical Note

James Harvey Young was a historian of patent medicine and food and drug regulation in the United States, as well as a long-time professor of History at Emory University. Born in 1915 in Brooklyn, N.Y., he grew up in Illinois and Indiana. He obtained his B.A. from Knox College in Galesburg, Ill., in 1937, and then pursued an M.A. in History in 1938 at the University of Illinois, where he also received his Ph.D. in History in 1941. Young married Myrna Goode in 1940 and took a position on the Emory University faculty in 1941 in the History Department. In 1949, he helped create Emory's graduate history program and became a founding member of the Emory Institute for Liberal Arts in 1952. During his time on the Emory faculty, Young received numerous University awards, including the Thomas Jefferson Award, the Emory Williams Distinguished Teaching Award, and the Arts and Sciences Award of Distinction. He remained at Emory until his retirement from teaching in 1984, chairing the History Department from 1958-1966 and teaching courses on American social history and the history of medicine and food and drug regulation. Young also served on numerous University committees and oversaw 37 doctoral dissertations. He died in 2006.

Young's earliest scholarly publications centered around Civil War abolitionist Anna Dickinson, but he was drawn to patent medicines and quackery while researching his master's thesis. Young went on to become one of the foremost scholars on health quackery, publishing The Toadstool Millionaires: A Social History of Patent Medicines in America Before Federal Regulation in 1961, followed by The Medical Messiahs: A Social History of Health Quackery in Twentieth-Century America in 1966 to complete the two-part opus. He also wrote Pure Food: Securing the Federal Food and Drugs Act of 1906 in 1989, and it quickly became regarded by social historians as the definitive reference guide to the history of the Food and Drug Administration in America. Outside of writing and research, he worked on a variety of governmental and regulatory committees related to health and consumer protection, including the White House Conference on Food, Nutrition and Health and the National Food and Drug Advisory Council. Young also served as president of the Southern Historical Association and on the executive council of the American Association for the History of Medicine.

James Harvey Young was a historian of patent medicine and food and drug regulation in the United States, as well as a long-time professor of History at Emory University. Born in 1915 in Brooklyn, N.Y., he grew up in Illinois and Indiana. He obtained his B.A. from Knox College in Galesburg, Ill., in 1937, and then pursued an M.A. in History in 1938 at the University of Illinois, where he also received his Ph.D. in History in 1941. Young married Myrna Goode in 1940 and took a position on the Emory University faculty in 1941 in the History Department. In 1949, he helped create Emory's graduate history program and became a founding member of the Emory Institute for Liberal Arts in 1952. During his time on the Emory faculty, Young received numerous University awards, including the Thomas Jefferson Award, the Emory Williams Distinguished Teaching Award, and the Arts and Sciences Award of Distinction. He remained at Emory until his retirement from teaching in 1984, chairing the History Department from 1958-1966 and teaching courses on American social history and the history of medicine and food and drug regulation. Young also served on numerous University committees and oversaw 37 doctoral dissertations. He died in 2006.

Young's earliest scholarly publications centered around Civil War abolitionist Anna Dickinson, but he was drawn to patent medicines and quackery while researching his master's thesis. Young went on to become one of the foremost scholars on health quackery, publishing The Toadstool Millionaires: A Social History of Patent Medicines in America Before Federal Regulation in 1961, followed by The Medical Messiahs: A Social History of Health Quackery in Twentieth-Century America in 1966 to complete the two-part opus. He also wrote Pure Food: Securing the Federal Food and Drugs Act of 1906 in 1989, and it quickly became regarded by social historians as the definitive reference guide to the history of the Food and Drug Administration in America. Outside of writing and research, he worked on a variety of governmental and regulatory committees related to health and consumer protection, including the White House Conference on Food, Nutrition and Health and the National Food and Drug Advisory Council. Young also served as president of the Southern Historical Association and on the executive council of the American Association for the History of Medicine.

Scope and Content Note

The James Harvey Young papers document the research, writing, Emory University career, and personal life of Dr. James Harvey Young. The records in this collection measure 66.75 linear feet and span 1893 to 2004, with the bulk of the records spanning from the 1940s to the 1990s. The collection is primarily comprised of correspondence, research materials, printed materials, manuscripts and drafts, and Emory University teaching, committee, and administrative papers.

The Emory University materials series, 1946-2002 (15 linear ft.), consists of materials related to University administration, University committees, and courses taught by Dr. Young. Administrative materials are comprised of papers related to Young's administrative work at the University, including grant proposals, faculty matters, and meetings with the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Committee materials document Young's involvement with various University committees, including the Committee on Undergraduate Education and the Executive Committee of the Graduate School. Correspondence relates to Emory University. Student materials include student papers written for courses taught by Young and letters of recommendation written by Young (all materials in this subseries are restricted).

The personal papers series, circa 1920s-2004 (29 linear ft.) includes papers related to personal life and family of James Harvey Young. Personal Correspondence spans Dr. Young's life, with letters to and from family and friends discussing daily life and personal events. Family papers contains materials related to Dr. Young's parents and grandfather, some photographs of Dr. Young and his family, and genealogical materials related to the Young and DeBra families. There is a sizable portion of correspondence to James Young (Young's grandfather), W. Harvey Young (Dr. Young's father), and Blanche DeBra Young (Young's mother). Also of note in this subseries is a scrapbook compiled by Blanche DeBra Young documenting her 1911 tour of Europe. It contains postcards and ephemera from the numerous countries and landmarks she visited, as well as receipts and tickets from lodging and transportation. Groups and Organizations materials relate to various organizations that Dr. Young belonged to. Though most are professional organizations, there is a sizable portion of papers related to the Glenn Memorial Couples Class, a church group that both Young and his wife participated in.

The Research and publications series, 1940-2003 (22 linear ft.), consists of manuscripts and drafts of writings and speeches by Dr. Young, notes, research correspondence, book reviews, and printed materials. The "American National Biography" entries are comprised of the biographical sketches written by Young. Anna Dickinson materials include notes, research, manuscripts, and correspondence that Dr. Young compiled and wrote during graduate school and early in his career. Conference materials consist of correspondence, speeches, and papers related to a multitude of conferences attended by Dr. Young. Correspondence includes scholarly correspondence on topics that Young was researching or writing about. History of the Food and Drug Administration interview transcripts contain typed transcripts of interviews conducted by Young and others with individuals who were influential in the early days of the Food and Drug Administration. The Toadstool Millionaires subseries is comprised of manuscripts, drafts, correspondence, and notes about The Toadstool Millionaires: A Social History of Patent Medicines in America Before Federal Regulation, published in 1961. The Medical Messiahs materials subseries contains manuscripts, drafts, and correspondence about The Medical Messiahs: A Social History of Health Quackery in Twentieth-Century America, a continuation of the content covered in The Toadstool Millionaires. Notes contains notes and research on a variety of subjects of interest to Young, including Coca-Cola and photography, among others. Printed Materials by Young document the numerous published papers, speeches, and book reviews written by Young, with a variety of journals and other scholarly publications playing host to his writing. The Pure Food materials subseries contains manuscripts of his 1989 book Pure Food: Securing the Federal Food and Drugs Act if 1906, an authoritative text which documents the history of the FDA and its implications. Writings and Speeches include typed and handwritten manuscripts of articles, papers, and speeches written by Dr. Young, and the Writings by Other subseries contains handwritten, typed, and printed articles and speeches by Young's contemporaries.

The Audiovisual materials series, circa 1930s-2003 (1 linear ft.) contains audio cassettes, video cassettes, compact discs, and reel-to-reel film. It includes audio and video tapes of lectures by Young and others, some unidentified tapes, and reel-to-reel tapes capturing shots from a World's Fair.

The Unprocessed and separated materials series, spanning the entire date range of the collections (35 linear feet), contains material that was separated or remained unprocessed during the processing of the collection. These materials were retained per the wishes of the family. The series contains duplicates, common publications, and other records of a non-original or transitory nature. Some family materials remain in this series, including many photographs.

Arrangement Note

Organized into five series: (1) Emory University materials, (2) Personal papers, (3) Research and Publications, (4) Audiovisual materials, and (5) Unprocessed and separated materials.


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Description of Series

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