FISHER, RUDOLPH, 1897-1934.
Rudolph Fisher collection, 1925-1926

Emory University

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/8z9cn


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Fisher, Rudolph, 1897-1934.
Title: Rudolph Fisher collection, 1925-1926
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 1008
Extent: .25 linear ft. (1 box)
Abstract:Papers relating to Rudolph Fisher, African American physician, novelist, dramatist, musician, and orator, including typescripts and correspondence.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on access

Unrestricted access.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Related Materials in Other Repositories

Rudolph Fisher papers, Special Collections, Brown University; Fisher notebook, 1923-1924, Otis Historical Archives, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C. and Fisher (Rudolph) family collection; Fisher family papers, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library, New York.

Source

Purchase, 2001.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], Rudolph Fisher collection, Manuscript, Archives and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Processed by Elizabeth Russey, February 26, 2005.


Collection Description

Biographical Note

Rudolph Fisher (1897-1934), African American physician, novelist, dramatist, musician, and orator, was born in Washington, D.C., on May 9, 1897. The last of six children (three of whom died prior to 1905) born to John Wesley Fisher, a clergyman, and Glendora Williamson Fisher, Fisher was raised in Providence, Rhode Island. He graduated from Providence's Classical High School with honors in 1915. He then attended Brown University, graduating in 1919 with an A.B. in English and an A.M. in biology a year later. He won numerous speaking contests while at Brown and gave a speech at his commencement. In 1924 Rudolph graduated from the Howard University Medical School with highest honors. Fisher married Jane Ryder (1894-?), a grade-school teacher in Washington, D.C., in 1924. They had one son Hugh (1926-1964), born in 1926. Rudolph interned at Freedmen's Hospital in Washington, D.C., from 1924 to 1925 and was a fellow with Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York from 1925 to 1927. Fisher was a pioneer in radiology, one of only thirty known African American physicians to be practicing or teaching radiology in 1934.

Rudolph Fisher was most noted for his literary works. A key figure of the Harlem Renaissance, Fisher published two novels, The Walls of Jericho (1928) and The Conjure-Man Dies: A Mystery Tale of Dark Harlem (1932), along with fifteen short stories, one essay, eight book reviews, and two research articles. He won first prize for "High Yaller" in the Amy Spingarn Contest in 1927. Also an accomplished musician, Fisher arranged a number of songs for Paul Robeson's first New York concert in 1929. Rudolph Fisher died December 26, 1934 in New York City.

Rudolph Fisher (1897-1934), African American physician, novelist, dramatist, musician, and orator, was born in Washington, D.C., on May 9, 1897. The last of six children (three of whom died prior to 1905) born to John Wesley Fisher, a clergyman, and Glendora Williamson Fisher, Fisher was raised in Providence, Rhode Island. He graduated from Providence's Classical High School with honors in 1915. He then attended Brown University, graduating in 1919 with an A.B. in English and an A.M. in biology a year later. He won numerous speaking contests while at Brown and gave a speech at his commencement. In 1924 Rudolph graduated from the Howard University Medical School with highest honors. Fisher married Jane Ryder (1894-?), a grade-school teacher in Washington, D.C., in 1924. They had one son Hugh (1926-1964), born in 1926. Rudolph interned at Freedmen's Hospital in Washington, D.C., from 1924 to 1925 and was a fellow with Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York from 1925 to 1927. Fisher was a pioneer in radiology, one of only thirty known African American physicians to be practicing or teaching radiology in 1934.

Rudolph Fisher was most noted for his literary works. A key figure of the Harlem Renaissance, Fisher published two novels, The Walls of Jericho (1928) and The Conjure-Man Dies: A Mystery Tale of Dark Harlem (1932), along with fifteen short stories, one essay, eight book reviews, and two research articles. He won first prize for "High Yaller" in the Amy Spingarn Contest in 1927. Also an accomplished musician, Fisher arranged a number of songs for Paul Robeson's first New York concert in 1929. Rudolph Fisher died December 26, 1934 in New York City.

Scope and Content Note

The collection consists primarily of material relating to the publication of Rudolph Fisher's short story, "The Shadow of White". In addition to an undated typescript of "The Shadow of White", the papers include correspondence between Rudolph Fisher and Paul Kellogg, the editor of Survey Graphic, which was a monthly illustrated periodical associated with Survey, the premiere journal of social work in America in the 1920s. Paul Kellogg had been particularly interested in publishing the work of writers associated with the Harlem Renaissance, printing an issue edited by Alain Locke in 1925. Although the correspondence indicates Kellogg's desire to print Fisher's manuscript, the story was never published. The collection also contains a typescript copy of Incident in Harlem, a short story by Fisher.

Arrangement Note

Arranged by material type.


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Container List

Box Folder Content
1 1 Correspondence, Rudolph Fisher to Paul Kellogg, 1925-1926
1 2 Correspondence, Paul Kellogg to Rudolph Fisher, 1926 [carbon copy]
1 3 Survey Graphicsubmission slip for "The Shadow of White," 1925
1 4 "The Shadow of White" [typescript]
1 5 "Incident in Harlem," [typescript]
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