FRANK, PATRICK H. (PATRICK HENRY), 1875-1950.
Patrick H. Frank family papers, 1898-1992

Emory University

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/8z9s9


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Frank, Patrick H. (Patrick Henry), 1875-1950.
Title: Patrick H. Frank family papers, 1898-1992
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 966
Extent: 4 linear ft. (8 boxes), 5 bound volumes (BV), 18 oversized papers (OP), and AV Masters: .55 linear feet (2 boxes)
Abstract:Papers of the Patrick Henry Frank family including correspondence, materials relating to the Franks' internment in the Philippines during World War II, photographs, printed material, and audiovisual materials.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Unrestricted access.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Source

Gift, 2003, with subsequent addition.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], Patrick H. Frank family papers, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Processed by Susan Potts McDonald, October 4, 2004


Collection Description

Biographical Note

Patrick Henry Frank (1875-1950), a private in the 23rd Infantry of the United State Army, arrived in the Philippines in 1898, participating in the Battle of Manila, overthrowing Spanish control of the Philippines and ushering in American sovereignty that would last until 1946. Frank remained as a soldier in the Philippines, serving in both the Philippine Insurrection and the Moro Wars. He chose to stay in the Philippines after he was discharged from the Army in 1902 and established small proprietary businesses in Cotabato and Zamboanga that included cattle, saloons, wholesale liquor, rental property, a hotel, and a plantation on the Davao Gulf.

In 1903 he married Eugenia Vitorio Garcia (1884-1909), the daughter of a Spanish naval officer and the couple had three children, Samuel Boone Frank (1904-1998), Laura (1906-1916), and Patrick James Frank (1908- ). He later married Annie Pauline Simoes on February 3, 1917.

Frank brought the first gas light to Zamboanga, entered the transportation business, and began tinkering with an improved process for stripping hemp. In 1921 he moved to Manila where he marshaled funds and manufacturing capability for his newly patented hemp-stripping machine and later, a successful desiccated coconut manufacturing process. By 1930, Frank was well established in the electric utility business, holding fifty-year legislative franchises in Jolo, Cotabato, and Davao.

His sons, Samuel and Patrick James Frank, were educated first in Hong Kong and later at the San Antonio Academy, before completing their educations at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. Samuel Frank married Frances Russell (1909-1982) and Patrick James married Genevieve Quinlin. The Frank brothers with their new wives returned to the Philippines where the boys joined their fathers businesses, Samuel managed the Davao Light & Power Company, and Patrick James worked for the Ford franchise of Mindanao Sales and Services.

Under the gathering threat of war with Japan, Frances and Genevieve along with their children returned to the United States in April 1941. Patrick Henry and his sons remained in the Philippines, struggling with deciding whether to sell their businesses or remain in the islands.

Following the outbreak of war with Japan on December 8, 1941, in the Philippines, Samuel and Patrick James were captured and imprisoned in the Davao Internment Camp. Patrick Henry Frank was captured in Manila and interned at Santo Tomás Internment Camp. The Davao camp was moved to Santa Tomás in 1944. Father and sons survived internment, illness, and starvation during the last months of the war and were liberated by American troops on February 3, 1945 and returned to the United States.

Patrick Henry Frank (1875-1950), a private in the 23rd Infantry of the United State Army, arrived in the Philippines in 1898, participating in the Battle of Manila, overthrowing Spanish control of the Philippines and ushering in American sovereignty that would last until 1946. Frank remained as a soldier in the Philippines, serving in both the Philippine Insurrection and the Moro Wars. He chose to stay in the Philippines after he was discharged from the Army in 1902 and established small proprietary businesses in Cotabato and Zamboanga that included cattle, saloons, wholesale liquor, rental property, a hotel, and a plantation on the Davao Gulf.

In 1903 he married Eugenia Vitorio Garcia (1884-1909), the daughter of a Spanish naval officer and the couple had three children, Samuel Boone Frank (1904-1998), Laura (1906-1916), and Patrick James Frank (1908- ). He later married Annie Pauline Simoes on February 3, 1917.

Frank brought the first gas light to Zamboanga, entered the transportation business, and began tinkering with an improved process for stripping hemp. In 1921 he moved to Manila where he marshaled funds and manufacturing capability for his newly patented hemp-stripping machine and later, a successful desiccated coconut manufacturing process. By 1930, Frank was well established in the electric utility business, holding fifty-year legislative franchises in Jolo, Cotabato, and Davao.

His sons, Samuel and Patrick James Frank, were educated first in Hong Kong and later at the San Antonio Academy, before completing their educations at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. Samuel Frank married Frances Russell (1909-1982) and Patrick James married Genevieve Quinlin. The Frank brothers with their new wives returned to the Philippines where the boys joined their fathers businesses, Samuel managed the Davao Light & Power Company, and Patrick James worked for the Ford franchise of Mindanao Sales and Services.

Under the gathering threat of war with Japan, Frances and Genevieve along with their children returned to the United States in April 1941. Patrick Henry and his sons remained in the Philippines, struggling with deciding whether to sell their businesses or remain in the islands.

Following the outbreak of war with Japan on December 8, 1941, in the Philippines, Samuel and Patrick James were captured and imprisoned in the Davao Internment Camp. Patrick Henry Frank was captured in Manila and interned at Santo Tomás Internment Camp. The Davao camp was moved to Santa Tomás in 1944. Father and sons survived internment, illness, and starvation during the last months of the war and were liberated by American troops on February 3, 1945 and returned to the United States.

Scope and Content Note

The collection consists of the papers of the Patrick H. Frank family from 1898-1992. The papers include correspondence, materials relating to the Franks' internment in the Philippines, photographs, printed material, and audio-visual materials. The collection mainly focuses on the Franks' experience just prior to and during World War II. The collection contains little documentation regarding Patrick H. Frank's service in the United States Army other than newspaper clippings of the letters that he wrote to his mother which were published in the Groveton Herald (Texas).

Arrangement Note

Arranged into six series: (1) Correspondence, (2) Internment Camps, (3) Other papers, (4) Photographs, (5) Printed material, and (6) Audiovisual material.


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Description of Series

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