GALLOWAY, CHARLES B. (CHARLES BETTS), 1849-1909.
Charles Betts Galloway papers,1879-1910

Emory University

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/8zb2h


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Galloway, Charles B. (Charles Betts), 1849-1909.
Title: Charles Betts Galloway papers,1879-1910
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 39
Extent: .25 linear ft. (1 box)
Abstract:Papers of Methodist Bishop Charles Betts Galloway. The collection consists of primarily of correspondence with some notes and clippings.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Unrestricted access.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Related Materials in This Repository

Young John Allen papers, Joseph R. Bingham papers, and Warren A. Candler papers.

Source

Gift, 1944 or 1945.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], Charles Betts Galloway papers, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.


Collection Description

Biographical Note

Charles Betts Galloway, born in Kosciusko, Mississippi on September 1, 1849, was the son of Charles Betts Galloway, a physician, and Adelaide Dinkins Galloway. He attended local schools around Canton, Mississippi, and graduated from the University of Mississippi in 1868. That year Galloway was also licensed as a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and admitted on trial to the Mississippi Conference. From this time until 1881, he served churches throughout the Conference. His longest periods of service as an active minister were spent in the cities of Jackson and Vicksburg. Galloway edited the New Orleans Christian Advocate from 1882 until 1886, the year that he was made a bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

As bishop, Galloway made extensive official tours of Asia and South America. His travels earned him the informal title of "missionary bishop of Methodism." In addition, he was a recognized leader in the fields of education and race relations in his home state of Mississippi. Bishop Galloway was also well known as an orator, both in and out of the pulpit. Bishop Galloway died on May 12, 1909.

Charles Betts Galloway, born in Kosciusko, Mississippi on September 1, 1849, was the son of Charles Betts Galloway, a physician, and Adelaide Dinkins Galloway. He attended local schools around Canton, Mississippi, and graduated from the University of Mississippi in 1868. That year Galloway was also licensed as a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and admitted on trial to the Mississippi Conference. From this time until 1881, he served churches throughout the Conference. His longest periods of service as an active minister were spent in the cities of Jackson and Vicksburg. Galloway edited the New Orleans Christian Advocate from 1882 until 1886, the year that he was made a bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

As bishop, Galloway made extensive official tours of Asia and South America. His travels earned him the informal title of "missionary bishop of Methodism." In addition, he was a recognized leader in the fields of education and race relations in his home state of Mississippi. Bishop Galloway was also well known as an orator, both in and out of the pulpit. Bishop Galloway died on May 12, 1909.

Scope and Content Note

The collection consists of the papers of Bishop Charles Betts Galloway from 1879-1910. The papers are primarily correspondence of southern Methodist bishops, ministers, and laymen to Bishop Galloway. There is a long run of correspondence from Bishop John Christian Keener to Bishop Galloway (29 letters, July 1888-November 29, 1897), which mainly concerns matters relating to the Mississippi Conference (transfers, etc.). Another major section of the correspondence includes letters written in 1898 and 1899 by various bishops, ministers, and laypersons to Bishop Galloway stating their opinions on the controversy over the "war claim" of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. This controversy grew out of the mishandled prosecution of a long-standing claim of the Church against the United States government. The claim resulted from the government's occupation of the Publishing House of the Church (located in Nashville, Tennessee) during the Civil War.

Prominent correspondents, in addition to Bishop Keener, are: James D. Barbee, Henry Stiles Bradley, Warren Akin Candler, Oscar Penn Fitzgerald, John Cowper Granbery, Robert Kennon Hargrove, Eugene Russell Hendrix, Isaac Stiles Hopkins, Hubbard Hinde Kavanaugh, Joseph Staunton Key, James William Lambuth, James Wideman Lee, Henry Clay Morrison, R. G. Porter, and Anson West.

Arrangement Note

Arranged in chronological order.


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Container List

Box Folder Content
1 1 Correspondence, December 28, 1879 - November 29, 1897
1 2 Correspondence, January 2, 1898 - February 9, 1910 and n.d.
1 3 Other papers, notes, clippings, etc.
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