GOULDING, F. R. (FRANCIS ROBERT), 1810-1881.
F. R. Goulding papers, 1846-1934

Emory University

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/8zbp0


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Goulding, F. R. (Francis Robert), 1810-1881.
Title: F. R. Goulding papers, 1846-1934
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 197
Extent: .25 linear ft. (1 box)
Abstract:Papers of minister, writer, inventor, and educator Frances Robert Goulding of Georgia. The collection primarily consists of correspondence with some photographs and other personal papers.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Unrestricted access.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

Special also restrictions apply: The collection contains some copies of original materials held by other institutions; these copies may not be reproduced without the permission of the owner of the originals.

Related Materials in Other Repositories

Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia

Source

Gift, prior to 1955.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], F. R. Goulding papers, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Processed by JVC, 1977.


Collection Description

Biographical Note

Francis Robert Goulding (September 28, 1810-August 22, 1881), minister, writer, inventor, and educator, was born in Midway, Liberty County, Georgia. He was the son of Thomas Goulding, Georgia's first native-born Presbyterian minister, and Ann Holbrook. The Gouldings lived in Midway and in Savannah until Francis was twelve, when they settled in Lexington. There his father started in his home what was later to become Columbia Theological Seminary.

Goulding graduated from the Franklin College (University of Georgia at Athens) in 1830 and from Columbia Theological Seminary in 1833. The same year, he entered the ministry and married Mary Wallace Howard in Savannah. The couple had six children: Charles Howard (1834-1862), Mary Wallace (b. 1837), Anna Louisa (b. 1840), Francis Ross (b. 1842), Benjamin Lloyd (1844-1934), and Thomas E. (b. 1846).

Francis Goulding preached in Sumter County, South Carolina and in Greensboro and Washington, Georgia. He then served as an agent for the American Bible Society from 1839 to 1842. He resumed preaching in Eatonton in 1842, and in Bath, Georgia, from 1843 to 1851. While in Eatonton, he invented a sewing machine for his wife, four years before Howe's was patented (according to the Dictionary of American Biography), but failed to secure a patent.

Goulding published his first story, entitled Little Josephine, in 1844. His next literary effort was Robert and Harold; The Young Marooners on the Florida Coast (1852), which had gone into ten editions by 1919.

Goulding began his career as an educator in 1853, when he opened a school for boys in Kingston, Georgia. After his first wife's death, he married Matilda Rees (b. 1820) in 1855 and moved to her plantation in Darien. They had twin girls, Mary Emma and Matilda Rees, in 1858. Goulding preached in Darien until 1862.

After the evacuation of Darien in 1862, the Gouldings moved to Macon. There Francis served as a Confederate chaplain, wrote for the Southern Presbyterian, compiled a Soldier's Hymn Book (1863), opened a school for girls in his home, and continued scientific experiments. His sons served in the Confederate Army. The eldest, Charles, died from disease on December 23, 1862.

When his health declined, Goulding retired from preaching and moved to Roswell in 1869. He supported himself by writing children's stories, including Marooner's Island (1869), and a series of books known as the "Woodruff Stories” (1870-1871). In 1881, Goulding died in Roswell and was buried in the cemetery of the First Presbyterian Church.

Francis Robert Goulding (September 28, 1810-August 22, 1881), minister, writer, inventor, and educator, was born in Midway, Liberty County, Georgia. He was the son of Thomas Goulding, Georgia's first native-born Presbyterian minister, and Ann Holbrook. The Gouldings lived in Midway and in Savannah until Francis was twelve, when they settled in Lexington. There his father started in his home what was later to become Columbia Theological Seminary.

Goulding graduated from the Franklin College (University of Georgia at Athens) in 1830 and from Columbia Theological Seminary in 1833. The same year, he entered the ministry and married Mary Wallace Howard in Savannah. The couple had six children: Charles Howard (1834-1862), Mary Wallace (b. 1837), Anna Louisa (b. 1840), Francis Ross (b. 1842), Benjamin Lloyd (1844-1934), and Thomas E. (b. 1846).

Francis Goulding preached in Sumter County, South Carolina and in Greensboro and Washington, Georgia. He then served as an agent for the American Bible Society from 1839 to 1842. He resumed preaching in Eatonton in 1842, and in Bath, Georgia, from 1843 to 1851. While in Eatonton, he invented a sewing machine for his wife, four years before Howe's was patented (according to the Dictionary of American Biography), but failed to secure a patent.

Goulding published his first story, entitled Little Josephine, in 1844. His next literary effort was Robert and Harold; The Young Marooners on the Florida Coast (1852), which had gone into ten editions by 1919.

Goulding began his career as an educator in 1853, when he opened a school for boys in Kingston, Georgia. After his first wife's death, he married Matilda Rees (b. 1820) in 1855 and moved to her plantation in Darien. They had twin girls, Mary Emma and Matilda Rees, in 1858. Goulding preached in Darien until 1862.

After the evacuation of Darien in 1862, the Gouldings moved to Macon. There Francis served as a Confederate chaplain, wrote for the Southern Presbyterian, compiled a Soldier's Hymn Book (1863), opened a school for girls in his home, and continued scientific experiments. His sons served in the Confederate Army. The eldest, Charles, died from disease on December 23, 1862.

When his health declined, Goulding retired from preaching and moved to Roswell in 1869. He supported himself by writing children's stories, including Marooner's Island (1869), and a series of books known as the "Woodruff Stories” (1870-1871). In 1881, Goulding died in Roswell and was buried in the cemetery of the First Presbyterian Church.

Scope and Content Note

The collection consists of the papers of Francis Robert Goulding from 1846-1934. The bulk of the collection consists of forty-three personal letters, mostly written to Goulding between 1861 and 1865. Five of the letters, from Dr. Stanford Emerson Chaille, a Confederate Army doctor, concerning the welfare of his daughter, Laura, who boarded in Goulding's school with two [?] of the family slaves. Three letters from Abner A. Porter (1817-1872), editor of the Southern Presbyterian, deal with publishing matters. One letter from David Wills (1822-1915), then minister of the First Presbyterian Church in Macon, deplores the lack of Presbyterian ministers in Army camps and includes a glowing description of General Daniel Harvey Hill

Letters from other prominent southern Presbyterian ministers include a letter of condolence from John Jones (1815-1893) after Charles Goulding's death; one from Henry Barrington Pratt (1832-1912), a letter from George Laurens Petrie (1840-1931), giving news of Petrie's father, Rev. George Hollinshead Whitefield Petrie; and a note from David H. Porter (1830-1873), then chaplain of the 5th Georgia Calvary, asking for news of soldiers from that regiment in Macon hospitals.

Other letters of particular interest include three from Alexander Mitchel (1797-1864), a merchant and an elder in Goulding's Darien congregation. In 1862, Mitchel vividly describes military and civilian activities in Darien after the evacuation, and, on October 21, 1862, recounts a futile search for Goulding's manuscripts of The Young Marooners and Devil Fish.

There are also several letters concerning Goulding's ideas for inventions, notably a letter from a fellow-inventor, John Branan Read (1816-1900), in 1861, which discusses in depth Goulding's idea for rocket-propelled cannon-shot.

The rest of the Goulding collection consists of a photograph of his home in Kingston which served as a schoolhouse, a quasi-biographical sketch of Goulding from the Atlanta Journal (March 2, 1934), Benjamin Goulding's obituary (March 22, 1934), and a clipping concerning a slave diary, written in Arabic and donated by Benjamin Goulding to the Georgia State Archives. There are also photocopies of three letters from Goulding, originals of which are in the University of Georgia collection.

In addition to those noted above, correspondents include David Wyatt Aiken (1828-1887), Augusta Alden, J. W. Belvin, E. M. Blount, Blount & Dawson (firm), J. R. Cheves, W. Dougherty, M. E. Dunwoody , Josiah Gorgas (1818-1883), Matilda Rees Goulding, Mrs. James Hine, Mrs. A. S. Jones, J Knowles, Frances C. McKinley, A. S. Muller, and John Newton Waddel (1812-1895).

Arrangement Note

Arranged in chronological order.


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Container List

Box Folder Content
1 1 Correspondence, 1861-1862
1 2 Correspondence, 1863
1 3 Correspondence, 1864-1865
1 4 Other papers, 1846-1934
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