Series 1
Correspondence, 1911-1981
Boxes 1- 8

Scope and Content Note

The correspondence in Series 1 ranges from 1911 to 1981, but most of it falls in the period 1933-1959. The series documents the Georgia WCTU's activities toward maintaining a viable and effective organization and toward accomplishing the primary purposes of the group, that is, total personal abstinence and legal prohibition.

The correspondence of the 1930's points to the difficulties the Georgia union faced after the 1933 repeal of the Eighteenth Amendment abolishing national prohibition. Letters going out to local unions and politicians reveal how statewide prohibition, in force since 1907, fell in 1935. The correspondence of the 1940's and 1950's shows that the Georgia WCTU faced particular difficulty in pursuing legislative goals because the General Assembly Temperance Committee rarely reported temperance bills out for general debate and vote.

Materials in Series 1 document the Georgia union's other efforts to achieve a temperate society including appeals to airline executives to resist serving alcohol to passengers, boycotts of grocery stores that sold beer and wine, and moves to ban the advertising of alcoholic products on radio and television. The correspondence in this series also documents the Georgia WCTU's efforts to encourage total personal abstinence, largely through educational efforts aimed at the general public but directed more particularly toward young people. In 1948 WCTU leaders helped persuade the State Department of Education to employ a coordinator of alcohol and drug education, and the subsequent correspondence shows how they worked with this state officer to ensure instruction in the schools and to train teachers to provide that instruction. In this effort they cooperated with the Georgia Temperance Union.

The correspondence in Series 1 further reveals the WCTU's work with young people through youth organizations that paralleled the parent body, such as the Loyal Temperance Legion (LTL), which organized activities for younger children, and the Youth Temperance Council (YTC), which served young people of high school and college age. Further information about the YTC and LTL can be found in Series 6 and 7 which contain organizational records of the two groups.

Although the post-prohibition WCTU narrowed its vision to focus primarily on temperance issues (unlike a broader scope noted in the late 19th century), the correspondence in this series shows that the Georgia organization did occasionally involve itself in other areas. In the late 1930's state WCTU leaders opposed President Franklin Roosevelt's effort to pack the Supreme Court. In the early 1950's they took a position on the United Nation's Genocide Resolution and in the 1970s they became interested in a range of issues including pari-mutual betting, statewide kindergartens, teachers' salaries, sunset legislation and the Equal Rights Amendment.

Letters in 1942, 1945, 1955, and 1956 indicate some of the difficulties racial issues presented to the Georgia WCTU. The problem centered more on how to include black women in the work of the organization than it did on how to carry the message to black people. In fact, the correspondence shows that a great deal of effort during the 1950s went to providing training in temperance education to black teachers.

In addition to providing information on what issues occupied the Georgia WCTU, the correspondence series documents how the organization worked to maintain its viability. When a new president assumed office in 1956, the nature and volume of the correspondence in the collection changed. It is unclear whether her correspondence did not survive or whether the decline of the organization itself had finally reached to the state level. The correspondence that does exist for the period 1956-1980, sparse as it is, shows that the group maintained positions similar to those of the 1940s and early 1950s and continued to struggle to keep the organization viable by reaching out to younger women and by encouraging older members to work harder.

Related correspondence can be found in Series 6, Youth Temperance Council Records; Series 7, Loyal Temperance Legion Records; and Series 8, National WCTU Records. Material related to the operation of the Georgia WCTU positions on various issues can be found in Series 4, Program Material; Series 5, Printed Material; Series 8, National WCTU Records; and in Series 10, Collected Material. Photographs of a few Georgia WCTU leaders are located in Series 11, Photographs and Memorabilia

Arrangement Note

Arranged in chronological order.

Scope and Content Note The correspondence in Series 1 ranges from 1911 to 1981, but most of it falls in the period 1933-1959. The series documents the Georgia WCTU's activities toward maintaining a viable and effective organization and toward accomplishing the primary purposes of the group, that is, total personal abstinence and legal prohibition. The correspondence of the 1930's points to the difficulties the Georgia union faced after the 1933 repeal of the Eighteenth Amendment abolishing national prohibition. Letters going out to local unions and politicians reveal how statewide prohibition, in force since 1907, fell in 1935. The correspondence of the 1940's and 1950's shows that the Georgia WCTU faced particular difficulty in pursuing legislative goals because the General Assembly Temperance Committee rarely reported temperance bills out for general debate and vote. Materials in Series 1 document the Georgia union's other efforts to achieve a temperate society including appeals to airline executives to resist serving alcohol to passengers, boycotts of grocery stores that sold beer and wine, and moves to ban the advertising of alcoholic products on radio and television. The correspondence in this series also documents the Georgia WCTU's efforts to encourage total personal abstinence, largely through educational efforts aimed at the general public but directed more particularly toward young people. In 1948 WCTU leaders helped persuade the State Department of Education to employ a coordinator of alcohol and drug education, and the subsequent correspondence shows how they worked with this state officer to ensure instruction in the schools and to train teachers to provide that instruction. In this effort they cooperated with the Georgia Temperance Union. The correspondence in Series 1 further reveals the WCTU's work with young people through youth organizations that paralleled the parent body, such as the Loyal Temperance Legion (LTL), which organized activities for younger children, and the Youth Temperance Council (YTC), which served young people of high school and college age. Further information about the YTC and LTL can be found in Series 6 and 7 which contain organizational records of the two groups. Although the post-prohibition WCTU narrowed its vision to focus primarily on temperance issues (unlike a broader scope noted in the late 19th century), the correspondence in this series shows that the Georgia organization did occasionally involve itself in other areas. In the late 1930's state WCTU leaders opposed President Franklin Roosevelt's effort to pack the Supreme Court. In the early 1950's they took a position on the United Nation's Genocide Resolution and in the 1970s they became interested in a range of issues including pari-mutual betting, statewide kindergartens, teachers' salaries, sunset legislation and the Equal Rights Amendment. Letters in 1942, 1945, 1955, and 1956 indicate some of the difficulties racial issues presented to the Georgia WCTU. The problem centered more on how to include black women in the work of the organization than it did on how to carry the message to black people. In fact, the correspondence shows that a great deal of effort during the 1950s went to providing training in temperance education to black teachers. In addition to providing information on what issues occupied the Georgia WCTU, the correspondence series documents how the organization worked to maintain its viability. When a new president assumed office in 1956, the nature and volume of the correspondence in the collection changed. It is unclear whether her correspondence did not survive or whether the decline of the organization itself had finally reached to the state level. The correspondence that does exist for the period 1956-1980, sparse as it is, shows that the group maintained positions similar to those of the 1940s and early 1950s and continued to struggle to keep the organization viable by reaching out to younger women and by encouraging older members to work harder. Related correspondence can be found in Series 6, Youth Temperance Council Records; Series 7, Loyal Temperance Legion Records; and Series 8, National WCTU Records. Material related to the operation of the Georgia WCTU positions on various issues can be found in Series 4, Program Material; Series 5, Printed Material; Series 8, National WCTU Records; and in Series 10, Collected Material. Photographs of a few Georgia WCTU leaders are located in Series 11, Photographs and Memorabilia
Box Folder Content
1 1 1911-1921, undated [includes some letters in French and two photographs]
1 2 1925-1926
1 3 1928
1 4 1931-1933
1 5 1934
1 6 1935
1 7 1936 January-June
1 8 1936 July-December
1 9 1937
1 10 1938
1 11 1939
1 12 1930s undated
1 13 1940
1 14 1941
2 1 1942
2 2 1943
2 3 1944
2 4 1945
2 5 1946
2 6 1947
2 7 1948
2 8 1949 January-May
2 9 1949 June-December
2 10 1940s undated
2 11 1950 January-June [contains photograph]
2 12 1950 July-December
3 1 1951 January-May
3 2 1951 June-December
3 3 1952 January-June
3 4 1952 July-September
3 5 1952 October-December
3 6 1953 January
3 7 1953 February
3 8 1953 March
3 9 1953 April
3 10 1953 May
3 11 1953 June
4 1 1953 July
4 2 1953 August
4 3 1953 September
4 4 1953 October
4 5 1953 November
4 6 1953 December
4 7 1953 undated
4 8 1954 January
4 9 1954 February
4 10 1954 March
4 11 1954 April
4 12 1954 May
4 13 1954 June
5 1 1954 July
5 2 1954 August
5 3 1954 September
5 4 1954 October-December
5 5 1954 undated
5 6 1955 January-June
5 7 1955 July-December
5 8 1956 January-February
5 9 1956 March-June
5 10 1956 July-December, undated
5 11 1957 January-March
5 12 1957 April-June
6 1 1957 July-September
6 2 1957 October-December, undated
6 3 1958 January-June
6 4 1958 July-December, undated
6 5 1959 January-March
6 6 1959 April-September
6 7 1959 October-December, undated
6 8 1950s undated
6 9 1960
7 1 1961
7 2 1962-1965
7 3 1966-1967
7 4 1968
7 5 1969 January-August
7 6 1969 September-December
7 7 1960s undated
7 8 1970 January-June
7 9 1970 July-December, undated
8 1 1971 January-June
8 2 1971 July-December, undated
8 3 1972-1975
8 4 1976
8 5 1977
8 6 1978
8 7 1979
8 8 1970s undated
8 9 1980
8 10 1981
8 11 Undated
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