Subseries 1.3
Personal correspondence, 1862-1917
Boxes 4-6; OP7; MF 4-5

Scope and Content Note

Harris corresponded with several important literary figures and national political and industrial leaders during his lifetime. He also received many letters from the public commenting on his writings. This subseries includes letters he received from both groups of people and copies of some of his responses.

Correspondence of literary and other prominent persons, filed alphabetically by the last name of the author, is from some of the leading American writers of the day, in addition to several Georgia authors, prominent politicians and industrialists. Among them are Samuel Langhorne Clemens, George Washington Cable, James Whitcomb Riley, Theodore Roosevelt, Andrew Carnegie, and Corra Harris. Many people wrote of their respect and admiration for Harris and his writings; some expressed gratitude for Harris's words of encouragement. Among the topics discussed are questions about publishers and royalties (Clemens), world peace (Carnegie), the "Negro problem" and the Atlanta riot of 1906 (Clinton Dangerfield (Ella Howard Bryan) and Will N. Harben), and Andrews' raid near Atlanta during the Civil War (William A. Fuller). Letters dating 1907-1908 are often responses to Harris's request for materials for the Uncle Remus Magazine. Warm friendships between Harris and Roosevelt, Riley, and Clemens are evident in these letters. As was true with Harris in his letters to his children, these authors and politicians rarely mentioned their own work.

The general correspondence dates from 1862-1912 and is arranged chronologically. The earliest letters are between Harris and newspaper publishers and friends. A critique by J.A. Turner of a story that Harris wrote for possible publication in The Countryman is one of the more important early letters. Other letters of the 1860s discuss the South's role in the Civil War. The bulk of papers in this section, however, again date from 1880-1908. Readers of Uncle Remus books or serialized stories which appeared in the Atlanta Constitution and in monthly periodicals wrote several letters. Some shared stories and outlines of "Brer Rabbit" tales they had heard as children. Others repeated folk tales heard in Australia, China, and Africa. Letters from friends, newspaper editors, and autograph seekers are also filed here. One group of letters dating 1905-1907 recounts the friendship of Harris and Dorothy Loye, a young admirer of Harris's living in Wisconsin. Finally, there are several letters from curious readers wanting to know the fate of particular characters after stories ended. Harris usually confessed that he himself had not been told of their outcomes.

Arrangement Note

Arranged into two groupings (1) Literary figures and other prominent persons in alphabetical order and (2) General correspondence in chronological order.

Finding Aid Note

Index to selected correspondents in Series 1 (Subseries 1.2-1.3) available.

Restrictions on Access

Special restrictions apply: Due to the fragile nature of the originals, researchers are required to use the microfilm copy.

Scope and Content Note Harris corresponded with several important literary figures and national political and industrial leaders during his lifetime. He also received many letters from the public commenting on his writings. This subseries includes letters he received from both groups of people and copies of some of his responses. Correspondence of literary and other prominent persons, filed alphabetically by the last name of the author, is from some of the leading American writers of the day, in addition to several Georgia authors, prominent politicians and industrialists. Among them are Samuel Langhorne Clemens, George Washington Cable, James Whitcomb Riley, Theodore Roosevelt, Andrew Carnegie, and Corra Harris. Many people wrote of their respect and admiration for Harris and his writings; some expressed gratitude for Harris's words of encouragement. Among the topics discussed are questions about publishers and royalties (Clemens), world peace (Carnegie), the "Negro problem" and the Atlanta riot of 1906 (Clinton Dangerfield (Ella Howard Bryan) and Will N. Harben), and Andrews' raid near Atlanta during the Civil War (William A. Fuller). Letters dating 1907-1908 are often responses to Harris's request for materials for the Uncle Remus Magazine. Warm friendships between Harris and Roosevelt, Riley, and Clemens are evident in these letters. As was true with Harris in his letters to his children, these authors and politicians rarely mentioned their own work. The general correspondence dates from 1862-1912 and is arranged chronologically. The earliest letters are between Harris and newspaper publishers and friends. A critique by J.A. Turner of a story that Harris wrote for possible publication in The Countryman is one of the more important early letters. Other letters of the 1860s discuss the South's role in the Civil War. The bulk of papers in this section, however, again date from 1880-1908. Readers of Uncle Remus books or serialized stories which appeared in the Atlanta Constitution and in monthly periodicals wrote several letters. Some shared stories and outlines of "Brer Rabbit" tales they had heard as children. Others repeated folk tales heard in Australia, China, and Africa. Letters from friends, newspaper editors, and autograph seekers are also filed here. One group of letters dating 1905-1907 recounts the friendship of Harris and Dorothy Loye, a young admirer of Harris's living in Wisconsin. Finally, there are several letters from curious readers wanting to know the fate of particular characters after stories ended. Harris usually confessed that he himself had not been told of their outcomes.
Microfilm copy [see content details below]
Box Folder Content
MF4 Personal correspondence, Box 4 - 5
MF5 Personal correspondence, Box 6
Literary Figures and Other Prominent Persons
4 1 Bierce, Ambrose (1 letter, 1896, typed copy of letter from JCH to Bierce)
4 2 Cable, George Washington (6 letters, 1883-1918)
4 3 Carnegie, Andrew (3 letters, 1907)
4 4 Clemens, Samuel Langhorne (11 letters, 1881-1885, 1 manuscript)
4 5 Dangerfield, Clinton (Ella Howard Bryan) (1 letter, 1907)
4 6 Edwards, Harry Stillwell (3 letters, 1880s-1908)
4 7 Fuller, William A. (14 letters, 1897-1903)
4 8 Fuller, William A. (Wilbur Kurtz story with transcripts of Fuller-Harris letters and newsclipping)
OP7 1 Fuller, William A. Copy of letter from JCH to Fuller (holograph in JCH hand), 12 December 1897
4 9 Garland, Hamlin (3 letters, 1902 and undated)
4 10 Harben, William Nathaniel (3 letters, 1900-1906)
4 11 Harris, Corra (6 letters, 1906-1908)
4 12 Hay, John (1 letter, 1904)
4 13 Hayne, Paul Hamilton (3 letters, 1883-1885)
4 14 Howells, William Dean (2 letters, 1907, 1917)
4 15 Johnson, Robert Underwood (for National Institute of Arts and Letters), 5 letters, 1883-1908)
4 16 Johnston, Richard Malcolm (6 letters, 1884-1890)
4 17 Kipling, Rudyard (3 letters, 1895 and undated)
4 18 Lanier, Sidney (2 letters, 1871, 1881 - letter of 1881 from Clifford Lanier)
4 19 Matthews, Brander (1 letter, 1884)
4 20 Page, Thomas Nelson (3 letters, 1885-1889)
5 1 Riley, James Whitcome (6 letters, 1881-1899)
5 2 Riley, James Whitcome (7 letters, 1900 April-May)
5 3 Riley, James Whitcome (4 letters, June 1900-April 1901)
5 4 Riley, James Whitcome (5 letters, August-November 1901)
5 5 Riley, James Whitcome (6 letters, January-October 1902)
5 6 Riley, James Whitcome (7 letters, November 1902-April 1903)
5 7 Riley, James Whitcome (5 letters, July-September 1903)
5 8 Riley, James Whitcome (12 items, 1904-1915) and undated
5 9 Roosevelt, Theodore (7 items, 1901-1907)
5 10 Roosevelt, Theodore (8 items, 1908 January-July) and undated
5 11 Stedman, Edmund Clarence (1 letter, 1889)
5 12 Stephens, Alexander H. (3 letters, 1879-1880)
5 13 Watson, Thomas E. (1 letter) [MISSING, 6/3/99]
5 14 Weeden, Howard (1 letter, 1905 from Elizabeth Price about Miss Weeden's death)
5 15 Woolson, Constance Fenimore (1 letter, 1890)
General correspondence
6 1 1863-1864
6 2 1870, 1880-1882
6 3 1883-1885
6 4 1887-1896
6 5 1897-1900
6 6 1901-1903
6 7 1904
6 8 1905
6 9 1906
6 10 1907 February-May
6 11 1907 June-November
6 12 1908, 1912
6 13 undated
6 14 undated
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