Series 2
Correspondence, 1860-1943
Boxes 2 - 12

Scope and Content Note

Series 2 holds most of the correspondence contained in the Emily Harrison papers, although some correspondence is also located in Series 5 (Education), Series 6 (Czechoslovakia), and Series 7 (Harrison family papers). While the dates range from 1860 to 1943, the bulk of the correspondence falls after 1880 and in large part concerns personal and family matters. Many of the letters were not written to or by Emily Harrison but rather were exchanged among different members of the Harrison family. The series is arranged chronologically, although a large number of undated letters located at the end of this series are arranged by name of correspondent.

The large proportion of family letters in this series makes the collection a good source for information about the internal dynamics of family life during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Emily Harrison's maternal grandmother, Cornelia Paine Hendree, exchanged letters regularly with her daughters (Emily Hendree [Stewart] Park, Anna Hendree Norwood and Laura Ligon Hendree Harrison) and with her brother (S. B. Paine). Emily's aunt, Emily Hendree [Stewart] Park, known as "Mamma Semmie" to her young nieces and nephews, wrote frequently to them and to their mother, Laura Hendree Harrison. The series also contains numerous letters that Emily Harrison's father, Z.D. Harrison, wrote to his children (Emily, Fanneal, Courtenay, Tinsley, Z.D. Jr., Hendree, and Agnes). Many of the Z.D. Harrison letters are undated and hence located at the end of the series.

Besides revealing aspects of family and personal relations for this period, the correspondence series also provides information about the family's involvement in church work, social service organizations and, generally, in the progressive reform movement (1880-1920). The earlier portion of the series contains letters that document Emily Hendree [Stewart] Park's European tours in 1889 and in 1891/1892. The correspondence also shows the interest she had in the budding careers of her younger relatives.

The correspondence series provides information about the involvement of the Harrison children, particularly Emily and Fanneal, in the progressive reform movement of the early twentieth century. When Emily Harrison went to work for the Southern Educational Journal, she appealed to her mother and aunt to submit articles and discussed with them some of the difficulties she experienced. Fanneal also became involved with the reform movement and sometimes wrote to her family about her work in various social service agencies. In 1909 she traveled to England to attend a labor conference where she met George Bernard Shaw and other Fabians. Later she performed social work in El Paso, Texas, and took a job as a hotel maid in San Francisco to experience first-hand the life of the working class.

After 1902, when Emily Harrison began her teaching career, her correspondence focused more on her own activities and the contacts she made outside the family. In 1902 she began a correspondence with Charlotte Hopkins that was to span four decades. While the series holds only the letters from Hopkins, this extensive and frequent correspondence provides a picture of an intense friendship as well as regular reactions to Harrison's various activities. Other correspondents outside the family include Suzette Lewington who reported that she had addressed the Susan B. Anthony Club in San Francisco (12 January 1908); Caroline Crosby, who worked in a settlement house (14 February 1908); and Lucy Graham, who was involved in the labor organization movement and in the fight against the abuse of child labor.

An increasing number of letters after 1902 concern Harrison's interest in educational reform. At the Georgia State Normal School she worked with Celestia S. Parrish, who had established the south's first laboratory school there (1902-1911) and who later became the state's supervisor of rural schools (1911-1918). Harrison corresponded with Parrish after the two of them left the Normal School. She also stayed in touch with Passie Fenton Ottley, another southern woman who avidly pursued her own educational goals (she received a D.Litt. from the University of Chicago in 1926, almost 40 years after her marriage in 1890). Ottley was a founder of the Georgia Federation of Women's Clubs, was active in social work and politics in Georgia, and played a central part in establishing the Tallulah Falls Industrial School in which Harrison took keen interest. [See Series 5, Education, and Series 8, Photographs, for other information about the Tallulah Falls School.]

Series 2 also contains letters to and from a wide range of educators and literati. Harrison met many such persons at educational association meetings, but she also wrote to others whom she had never met. Such exchanges during the period 1902-1920 provide a rich source of information about progressive education as well as about other aspects of the progressive movement. Correspondents include Julia Collier Harris, Elvira Cabel, Clark Howell, Lucy Stanton, Lucy Davis, H.W. Rolfe, William H. Kilpatrick, Frank R. Page and J.R. Moseley. In August 1925 a series of letters concerns the Fairhope, Alabama, educational project. There is additional information about Fairhope's School of Organic Education in Series 5, Education.

Some of Harrison's early correspondence also shows how strongly she felt about Fernbank, her family's estate that encompassed many acres of virgin Piedmont woodlands. The topic of Fernbank and her plans for a "school-in-the-woods" figured prominently in her correspondence early in her educational career and became a central focus after 1926 when she returned to Atlanta. Between 1926 and 1943 Harrison concentrated on developing plans for her school and on devising means to preserve Fernbank's forest in its natural state. Much of this effort is documented in this series, but there are other pertinent records and correspondence about Fernbank in Series 5. Photographs of the property are located in Series 8.

Arrangement Note

Arranged in chronological order.

Scope and Content Note Series 2 holds most of the correspondence contained in the Emily Harrison papers, although some correspondence is also located in Series 5 (Education), Series 6 (Czechoslovakia), and Series 7 (Harrison family papers). While the dates range from 1860 to 1943, the bulk of the correspondence falls after 1880 and in large part concerns personal and family matters. Many of the letters were not written to or by Emily Harrison but rather were exchanged among different members of the Harrison family. The series is arranged chronologically, although a large number of undated letters located at the end of this series are arranged by name of correspondent. The large proportion of family letters in this series makes the collection a good source for information about the internal dynamics of family life during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Emily Harrison's maternal grandmother, Cornelia Paine Hendree, exchanged letters regularly with her daughters (Emily Hendree [Stewart] Park, Anna Hendree Norwood and Laura Ligon Hendree Harrison) and with her brother (S. B. Paine). Emily's aunt, Emily Hendree [Stewart] Park, known as "Mamma Semmie" to her young nieces and nephews, wrote frequently to them and to their mother, Laura Hendree Harrison. The series also contains numerous letters that Emily Harrison's father, Z.D. Harrison, wrote to his children (Emily, Fanneal, Courtenay, Tinsley, Z.D. Jr., Hendree, and Agnes). Many of the Z.D. Harrison letters are undated and hence located at the end of the series. Besides revealing aspects of family and personal relations for this period, the correspondence series also provides information about the family's involvement in church work, social service organizations and, generally, in the progressive reform movement (1880-1920). The earlier portion of the series contains letters that document Emily Hendree [Stewart] Park's European tours in 1889 and in 1891/1892. The correspondence also shows the interest she had in the budding careers of her younger relatives. The correspondence series provides information about the involvement of the Harrison children, particularly Emily and Fanneal, in the progressive reform movement of the early twentieth century. When Emily Harrison went to work for the Southern Educational Journal, she appealed to her mother and aunt to submit articles and discussed with them some of the difficulties she experienced. Fanneal also became involved with the reform movement and sometimes wrote to her family about her work in various social service agencies. In 1909 she traveled to England to attend a labor conference where she met George Bernard Shaw and other Fabians. Later she performed social work in El Paso, Texas, and took a job as a hotel maid in San Francisco to experience first-hand the life of the working class. After 1902, when Emily Harrison began her teaching career, her correspondence focused more on her own activities and the contacts she made outside the family. In 1902 she began a correspondence with Charlotte Hopkins that was to span four decades. While the series holds only the letters from Hopkins, this extensive and frequent correspondence provides a picture of an intense friendship as well as regular reactions to Harrison's various activities. Other correspondents outside the family include Suzette Lewington who reported that she had addressed the Susan B. Anthony Club in San Francisco (12 January 1908); Caroline Crosby, who worked in a settlement house (14 February 1908); and Lucy Graham, who was involved in the labor organization movement and in the fight against the abuse of child labor. An increasing number of letters after 1902 concern Harrison's interest in educational reform. At the Georgia State Normal School she worked with Celestia S. Parrish, who had established the south's first laboratory school there (1902-1911) and who later became the state's supervisor of rural schools (1911-1918). Harrison corresponded with Parrish after the two of them left the Normal School. She also stayed in touch with Passie Fenton Ottley, another southern woman who avidly pursued her own educational goals (she received a D.Litt. from the University of Chicago in 1926, almost 40 years after her marriage in 1890). Ottley was a founder of the Georgia Federation of Women's Clubs, was active in social work and politics in Georgia, and played a central part in establishing the Tallulah Falls Industrial School in which Harrison took keen interest. [See Series 5, Education, and Series 8, Photographs, for other information about the Tallulah Falls School.] Series 2 also contains letters to and from a wide range of educators and literati. Harrison met many such persons at educational association meetings, but she also wrote to others whom she had never met. Such exchanges during the period 1902-1920 provide a rich source of information about progressive education as well as about other aspects of the progressive movement. Correspondents include Julia Collier Harris, Elvira Cabel, Clark Howell, Lucy Stanton, Lucy Davis, H.W. Rolfe, William H. Kilpatrick, Frank R. Page and J.R. Moseley. In August 1925 a series of letters concerns the Fairhope, Alabama, educational project. There is additional information about Fairhope's School of Organic Education in Series 5, Education. Some of Harrison's early correspondence also shows how strongly she felt about Fernbank, her family's estate that encompassed many acres of virgin Piedmont woodlands. The topic of Fernbank and her plans for a "school-in-the-woods" figured prominently in her correspondence early in her educational career and became a central focus after 1926 when she returned to Atlanta. Between 1926 and 1943 Harrison concentrated on developing plans for her school and on devising means to preserve Fernbank's forest in its natural state. Much of this effort is documented in this series, but there are other pertinent records and correspondence about Fernbank in Series 5. Photographs of the property are located in Series 8.
Dated correspondence
Box Folder Content
2 1 1860-1889
2 2 1891 January-July
2 3 1891 August
2 4 1891 September
2 5 1891 October-December
2 6 1892
2 7 1893-1895
2 8 1896-1900
2 9 1901-1902
3 1 1903 January-June
3 2 1903 July-December
3 3 1904 January-February
3 4 1904 March-April
3 5 1904 May-June
3 6 1904 July-September
3 7 1904 October-December
4 1 1905 January-February
4 2 1905 March-May
4 3 1905 June-August
4 4 1905 September-December
4 5 1906 January-March
4 6 1906 April-May
4 7 1906 June-September
4 8 1906 October-December
5 1 1907 January-March
5 2 1907 April-June
5 3 1907 July-August
5 4 1907 September-November
5 5 1907 December
5 6 1908 January
5 7 1908 February
5 8 1908 March
6 1 1908 April-May
6 2 1908 June-August
6 3 1908 September-October
6 4 1908 November-December
6 5 1909 January-February
6 6 1909 March-June
6 7 1909 July-September
6 8 1909 October-December
7 1 1910 January-February
7 2 1910 March-April
7 3 1910 May-August
7 4 1910 September-October
7 5 1910 November-December
7 6 1911 January-February
7 7 1911 March-April
7 8 1911 May-July
8 1 1911 August-October
8 2 1911 November-December
8 3 1912 January-February
8 4 1912 March-April
8 5 1912 May-September
8 6 1912 October-December
8 7 1913 January-May
8 8 1913 June-September
8 9 1913 October-December
9 1 1914
9 2 1915 January-April
9 3 1915 May-December
9 4 1916 January-June
9 5 1916 July-September
9 6 1916 October-December
9 7 1917 January-June
9 8 1917 July-December
10 1 1918 January-August
10 2 1918 September-December
10 3 1919 January-April
10 4 1919 May-December
10 5 1920 January-June
10 6 1920 July-December
10 7 1921
10 8 1922 January-May
10 9 1922 June-December
11 1 1923 January-March
11 2 1923 April-August
11 3 1923 September-December
11 4 1924 January-March
11 5 1924 June-November
11 6 1925 January-April
11 7 1925 May-December
11 8 1926-1927
11 9 1928-1930
11 10 1931-1932
11 11 1933-1936
11 12 1937
11 13 1938
11 14 1939-1943
Undated correspondence
11 15 From Emily Harrison, ca. 1891
11 16 From Emily Harrison
12 1 Z.D. Harrison
12 2 Mrs. Z.D. Harrison
12 3 Courtenay Harrison, ca. 1908
12 4 Fanneal Harrison
12 5 Tinsley Harrison
12 6 Michael Hoke
12 7 Emily Hendree [Stewart] Park
12 8 Nora Belle Starke ("Cousin") and her mother, ("Auntie")
12 9 Family letters
12 10 Elvira "Ellie" D. Cabell
12 11-12 Charlotte Hopkins
12 13 Laura Macadoo Triggs
12 14-16 General
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