HEANEY, SEAMUS, 1939-
Seamus Heaney collection, 1972-2014

Emory University

Robert W. Woodruff Library

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/8zf2t

Collection Stored Off-Site

All or portions of this collection are housed off-site. Materials can still be requested but researchers should expect a delay of up to two business days for retrieval.


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Heaney, Seamus, 1939-
Title: Seamus Heaney collection, 1972-2014
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No.653
Extent: 1.5 linear foot (3 boxes), 2 oversized papers boxes and 1 oversized papers folder (OP), AV Masters: .25 linear feet (1 box), and 13.6 GB born digital material (6 files)
Abstract: Collection of materials relating to Irish poet Seamus Heaney including correspondence, writings by Heaney, printed materials, and photographs.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on access

Special restrictions apply: Collection stored off-site. Researchers must contact the Rose Library in advance to access this collection.

Researchers must contact the Rose Library in advance for access to audiovisual materials in this collection.

Access to processed born digital materials is only available in the Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library (the Rose Library). Use of the original digital media is restricted.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Related Materials in This Repository

Ciaran Carson papers, Peter Fallon/The Gallery Press Collection, Seamus Heaney papers, Ted Hughes papers, Thomas Kinsella papers, Michael Longley papers, Derek Mahon papers, Medbh McGuckian papers, Charles Montieth papers, Paul Muldoon papers, Edna O'Brien papers, Desmond O'Grady papers, Frank Ormsby papers, Tom Paulin papers, and James Simmons papers

Source

Collection assembled from various sources.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], Seamus Heaney collection, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Processed by Pat Clark, May 7, 2001.

Additions, Teresa Burk, May 30, 2003

Born digital materials processed, arranged, and described by Brenna Edwards, 2020. Born digital materials include files taken from one flash drive. For information as to how these materials were processed, see the processing note in the description of series 5, Audiovisual material.

This finding aid may include language that is offensive or harmful. Please refer to the Rose Library's harmful language statement for more information about why such language may appear and ongoing efforts to remediate racist, ableist, sexist, homophobic, euphemistic and other oppressive language. If you are concerned about language used in this finding aid, please contact us at rose.library@emory.edu.


Collection Description

Biographical Note

Seamus Heaney was born on April 13, 1939, the eldest of nine children, to Margaret and Patrick Heaney, at the family farm, Mossbawn, northwest of Belfast in County Derry. He attended the local school at Anahorish until 1957 when he enrolled at Queens College, Belfast, where he studied English. After graduation he taught English at St. Joseph's College in Belfast.

While at St. Joseph's he began to write, publishing work in university magazines under the pseudonym Incertus. During that time, he joined a poetry workshop organized by Philip Hobsbaum. In 1965, in connection with the Belfast Festival, he published Eleven Poems, and in August of that year he married Marie Devlin. The following year he became a lecturer in modern English literature at Queens College; his first son, Michael, was born; and Faber and Faber published Death of a Naturalist. This collection earned him the Eric Gregory Award, the Cholmondeley Award, the Somerset Maugham Award, and the Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize. Marie and Seamus Heaney's second son, Christopher, was born in 1968.

Door Into the Dark, published in 1969, was a Poetry Book Society Choice for the year. In 1970-1971, Heaney was guest lecturer at the University of California, Berkeley. He returned to Northern Ireland in 1971, and in 1972 he resigned his lectureship at Queens College, moved his family to Glanmore, in County Wicklow, and published Wintering Out. In 1973 his daughter Catherine Ann was born. During this year he also received the Denis Devlin Award and the Writer in Residence Award from the American Irish Foundation. In 1975 North was published, winning the E.M. Forster Award and the Duff Cooper Memorial Prize. During these years at Glanmore, Heaney also gave many readings in the United States and England and edited two poetry anthologies.

In 1975 Heaney began teaching at Carysfort College in Dublin, and in 1976 he and his family moved to Sandymount in the city. In 1979 Heaney published Field Work and in 1980 Selected Poems and Preoccupations. In 1981 he gave up his position at Carysfort to become visiting professor at Harvard. In 1982 he won the Bennett Award and Queens University awarded him an honorary Doctor of Letters. He co-founded Field Day company with the playwright Brian Friel and others in 1983. Station Island, his first collection in five years, was published in 1984. During that year he was elected Boylston Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory at Harvard. That same year his mother died.

In 1988 Seamus Heaney visited Emory University where he inaugurated the Richard Ellmann Lectures in Modern Literature. These lectures were collected and published as The Place of Writing in 1989. In 1991 Heaney published a new collection Seeing Things, followed by the Redress of Poetry in 1995. In the fall of that year, Heaney was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature.

Seamus Heaney was born on April 13, 1939, the eldest of nine children, to Margaret and Patrick Heaney, at the family farm, Mossbawn, northwest of Belfast in County Derry. He attended the local school at Anahorish until 1957 when he enrolled at Queens College, Belfast, where he studied English. After graduation he taught English at St. Joseph's College in Belfast.

While at St. Joseph's he began to write, publishing work in university magazines under the pseudonym Incertus. During that time, he joined a poetry workshop organized by Philip Hobsbaum. In 1965, in connection with the Belfast Festival, he published Eleven Poems, and in August of that year he married Marie Devlin. The following year he became a lecturer in modern English literature at Queens College; his first son, Michael, was born; and Faber and Faber published Death of a Naturalist. This collection earned him the Eric Gregory Award, the Cholmondeley Award, the Somerset Maugham Award, and the Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize. Marie and Seamus Heaney's second son, Christopher, was born in 1968.

Door Into the Dark, published in 1969, was a Poetry Book Society Choice for the year. In 1970-1971, Heaney was guest lecturer at the University of California, Berkeley. He returned to Northern Ireland in 1971, and in 1972 he resigned his lectureship at Queens College, moved his family to Glanmore, in County Wicklow, and published Wintering Out. In 1973 his daughter Catherine Ann was born. During this year he also received the Denis Devlin Award and the Writer in Residence Award from the American Irish Foundation. In 1975 North was published, winning the E.M. Forster Award and the Duff Cooper Memorial Prize. During these years at Glanmore, Heaney also gave many readings in the United States and England and edited two poetry anthologies.

In 1975 Heaney began teaching at Carysfort College in Dublin, and in 1976 he and his family moved to Sandymount in the city. In 1979 Heaney published Field Work and in 1980 Selected Poems and Preoccupations. In 1981 he gave up his position at Carysfort to become visiting professor at Harvard. In 1982 he won the Bennett Award and Queens University awarded him an honorary Doctor of Letters. He co-founded Field Day company with the playwright Brian Friel and others in 1983. Station Island, his first collection in five years, was published in 1984. During that year he was elected Boylston Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory at Harvard. That same year his mother died.

In 1988 Seamus Heaney visited Emory University where he inaugurated the Richard Ellmann Lectures in Modern Literature. These lectures were collected and published as The Place of Writing in 1989. In 1991 Heaney published a new collection Seeing Things, followed by the Redress of Poetry in 1995. In the fall of that year, Heaney was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature.

Scope and Content Note

The collection consists of materials relating to Seamus Heaney from 1972-2014 including, writings by Heaney, printed materials, photographs and correspondence. The manuscript writings in the collection include multiple drafts of "Fosterage," a two-page typescript on Michael McLaverty (published as an introduction to McLaverty's Collected Stories in 1978), a manuscript of a talk on Wordsworth's Prelude which Heaney wrote for Irish radio around 1974, and settings copies of the poems "Bog Queen," "Punishment," "The Grauballe Man," and "Kinship," with editor's markings and corrections in Heaney's hand. There is also a manuscript of a poem "For Daisy," written on the occasion of Daisy Garnett's christening. Heaney gave the keynote address during Emory University's 2003 commencement and a typescript draft with revisions in his hand is also included in this section.

The collection also includes printed promotional posters, programs, a small group of photographs, and a DVD of an interview with Heaney. Born digital material includes video interviews with friends of Heaney's.

The restricted correspondence consists of letters from Seamus Heaney to Sebastian Barker from 1981-1991 and relate to proposed readings, an essay Heaney was writing on Patrick Kavanagh, and Barker's proposal that Heaney serve as President of the Poetry Society. Additional correspondence with Mrs. Parker (1976) and "Robert" (1978) relate to items found in the writing series of this collection and the J. Howard Woolmer correspondence relates to the publication of Stern, a poem in memory of Ted Hughes.

Arrangement Note

Organized into five series: (1) Writings by Seamus Heaney, (2) Printed material and memorabilia, (3) Photographs, (4) Restricted correspondence, and (5) Audiovisual materials.


Selected Search Terms

Personal Names

Topical Terms

Geographic Names

Form/Genre Terms

Occupation


Description of Series

v1.11.0-dev