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Series 4
Naval stores, forestry, paper and pulp, 1860-1938
Boxes 38-55 and 145-146

Scope and Content Note

Although Herty began his career as a theoretical chemist, his major scientific achievements involved the practical application of chemistry to forest products. In 1901, Herty devised a cup and gutter system for collecting turpentine, based on the French Hugues cup and gutter system but adapted to the labor and transportation conditions of the American South. The Herty system replaced the boxing system which was at that time the traditional way to gather oleoresin (turpentine and rosin) from pine trees in the United States. The boxing system, in which a "box" or trough was cut in a pine tree to serve as a receptacle for the oleoresin I was inefficient and left the trees in a weakened and collapsed condition. The rosin-filled boxes were also a fire hazard. In the summer of 1901, Herty introduced his system on an experimental scale in Statesboro, Georgia. McDougald and Company of Statesboro furnished a tract of pine timber, and various railroads in the turpentine belt provided free transportation in connection with the work. A more extended series of investigations were conducted in Ocilla, Georgia. The cup and gutter system quickly became the standard method of turpentining of the American naval stores industry.

Herty had notified U. S. Forester Gilbert Pinchot of his intended experiment, and Pinchot appointed him a collaborator with the U. S. Bureau of Forestry (1901) in order to assist the work at Statesboro. The experiment consisted of a study of the comparative yields (quantity and quality) of boxes and cups. The results were encouraging and Herty was commissioned as a Bureau officer (1902-1904) to carry out further investigations of the cup and gutter system. Herty received a patent for his turpentining process in 1903 and spent much time promoting his cup and gutter system. The Bureau volunteered his services and those of other staff members to introduce the cup and gutter system to individual turpentine operators.

Herty became more involved in the production of his patented turpentine cup in 1902 because the demand for the clay cups was much greater than the supply. In October, 1902, Herty, Charles L. Krager, manager of the Chattanooga Pottery Company (Daisy, Tennessee), and John Powell, a naval stores factor in Ocilla, and other naval stores factors organized a stock company to manufacture the cups. They bought out the Chattanooga Pottery Company which had manufactured some of the first Herty cups. Powell became president and Krager remained manager. The Bureau of Forestry objected to any official connection between Herty and the company, and in 1904 Herty resigned his commission to work for the company (1904-1905). In 1910 the Chattanooga Pottery Company was reorganized as the Herty Turpentine Cup Company.

Herty maintained an interest in the naval stores industry after he became a professor at the University of North Carolina (1905-1916). During this time he conducted research on oleoresins in cooperation with the U. S. Forest Service, and he studied industrial and scientific applications of pine products.

The Navel Stores General Correspondence section contains correspondence from 1900-1905 concerning the development of the cup and gutter system, obtaining low railroad freight rates for cups and gutters, and correspondence about the state of the naval stores industry. Correspondents include the following naval stores factors and operators: J. B. Chesnutt of Chesnutt & O'Neill (Savannah); Ellis Young Company (Savannah); D. C. and J. A. McDougald of J. A. McDougald & Company (Statesboro); John Morrison of Williams & Morrison (Moultrie); John H. Powell of Powell, Bullard and Company (Ocilla); W. C. Powell, president of Southern Naval Stores Company (Savannah); J. P. Williams of J. P. William Company (Savannah); R. M. Williams of R. M. Williams Manufacturers (Statesboro); W. F. Coachman of Consolidated Naval Stores Company (Jacksonville, Fla.); and Pitt Brothers Company (Jacksonville).

There is also correspondence with railroads: J. W. Mallory, agent and John M. Egan, president, Central of Georgia Railway Company; Southern Railway Company; Plant System of Railways; and Tifton, Thomasville and Gulf Railways. Herty corresponded about his turpentining system with members of the press including: J. A. Hollomon of the Industrial Record; Thomas Gamble, Jr., editor of Weekly Naval Stores Review; B. F. Ulmer, managing editor, Dixie; and with the Cotton Trade Journal.

In 1900 Herty began an infrequent but lifelong correspondence with James Watt of James Watt & Sons, a London naval stores dealer. They wrote to each other about conditions in the American and European naval stores industries. Another lifelong correspondence began in 1901 with Roland M. Harper, a botanist who shared Herty's enthusiasm for the southern pine.

The naval stores correspondence for 1906-1916 deals mainly with Herty's research at the University of North Carolina into the scientific composition of various pine products and their use in industry. Some of his research was funded by the U. S. Forest Service. After 1916 there is relatively little correspondence directly related to the naval stores industry; most of it is of a personal nature between Herty and old friends in the industry.

The U.S. Bureau of Forestry section contains correspondence between Herty and operators who wanted to try out the new cup and gutter system. Operators include: E. L. Vickers (Oldfield, Georgia); Union Naval Stores Company (Mobile, Alabama); C. A. Sessoms (Bonifay, Florida); A. D. Covington (Bristol, Florida); J. P. Saunders of Consolidated Naval Stores (Savannah); H. H. Elarbee (Raiford, Florida); Bay Naval Stores Company (Bay St. Louis, Mississippi); J. E. North Lumber Company (Bond, Mississippi); Jackson Lumber Company (Lockhart, Alabama); R. B. Russell (Houston, Texas) and W. C. Jackson of W. C. Jackson & Company (Green Cove Springs, Florida). This section also contains correspondence with manufacturers of turpentine tools, metal companies, and potteries about equipment for Herty's turpentining system, as well as correspondence relating to Herty's turpentining patent.

The section relating to the Chattanooga Pottery Company (1902-1909) which later became the Herty Turpentine Cup Company (1910-1936) includes correspondence about turpentining equipment and Herty's patent after 1902. The Navel Stores Patents section contains patents of processes and apparatus for the destructive distillation of wood and the recovery and purification of wood distillation products such as rosin and turpentine (1860-1933); patents of turpentine collecting processes and apparatus (1868-1938); and other patents concerning pine oil and rosin products (1888-1935).

The U.S. Bureau of Forestry section contains files about Herty's work for the Bureau as a collaborator (1901) and a Bureau Officer (1902-1904). There is correspondence with Gifford Pinchot, chief of the Bureau of Forestry and with Bureau officers George B. Sudworthl, Overton Price, and less frequently Otto J. J. Luebkert and F. E. Olmstead. Frank Klarpp, who had worked for Herty during the Statesboro experiment, was hired by the Bureau (1909-1907) at his request to help with the work at Ocilla and later at Green Cove Springs, Florida. Correspondence with Klarpp between 1902 and 1907 is filed in U. S. Bureau of Forestry correspondence. Correspondence prior and subsequent to these dates is filed in naval stores general correspondence. There is no correspondence with the Bureau of Forestry for 1905.

The U.S. Forest Service section includes correspondence with the Service for the years 1906-1937. Although Herty resigned from the U. S. Bureau of Forestry in 1904, systematic investigations of his cup and gutter system were continued at Green Cove Springs, Florida, through the first months of 1909. Herty kept up with the developments, offered advice, and compiled the results of the experiment for publication (U. S. Forest Service Bulletin No. 90, 1911). He also obtained funds from the Forest Service for experimental work on oleoresins at the University of North Carolina (1906-1916). Most of the correspondence for these years is with George B. Sudworth.

Between 1916 and 1922, Herty kept in touch with Forest Service officers (Sudworth, S. F. Acree, Howard F. Weiss, Carlile P. Winslow and A. W. Schorger) about the activities of the Forest Service and particularly the Forest Products Laboratory. In 1916 he began to correspond regularly with microscopist Eloise Gerry about her work on resin formation and flow. In 1920 he was on the General Committee on the Decennial Celebration of the Forest Products Laboratory. There is no 1923 correspondence with the Forest Service.

Correspondence for the years 1926-1929 deals with Herty's efforts to secure the passage of legislation to enlarge the research activities of the Forest Service. He corresponded with Senator Duncan U. Fletcher (Florida), Senator Joseph Ransdell (Louisiana), and other legislators about various bills introduced by Senator Fletcher and Representative McSweeney to aid forest products research.

In 1929 there is some correspondence with E. L. Demmon, director of the Southern Forest Experiment Station about the progress of the Forest Service in making paper from southern woods. Correspondence with Forest Service officers in 1930 and 1931 concerns Eloise Gerry's work and Herty's promotion of southern pine as a source of newsprint. There is no correspondence for 1932 and only a little for the years 1933, 1934, and 1937. It also is chiefly concerned with Herby's work on southern pine for paper pulp.

The series also includes papers about the Georgia Forest Service, the Florida Forest Service and other state services. These papers are mainly concerned with Herty's efforts to promote forestry conservation and education through speeches and articles.

Herty is best remembered in the South for his efforts to establish a Southern newsprint paper industry. He did not become actively involved until 1927 when he visited the pine forest of Alex Sessoms in Cogdell, Georgia. He was struck by the denseness of the timber stands and speculated on the use of the thinnings for newsprint paper pulp. After an analysis of southern pine indicated & law resin content, Herty began a publicity campaign promoting the use of young southern pines for paper pulp. The campaign generated a great amount of interest, and led to the establishment in 1932 of the Savannah Pulp and Paper Laboratory which was funded by grants from the Chemical Foundation, the State of Georgia, and the city of Savannah. Herty was appointed director, and the work was carried out as part of the Pulp and Paper Division of the Georgia State Department of Forestry and Geological Development. Most of the experiments dealt with sulphite pulps. On November 20, 1933, nine Georgia newspapers printed their editions on newsprint made from pulp from the Savannah Laboratory; interest in a Southern newsprint industry increased.

During this time Herty was often erroneously credited with the invention of the actual process of manufacturing paper from pine. Although Herty only claimed to have demonstrated the feasibility of making newsprint paper from southern pine, the extensive and often misleading publicity given to his work created resentment among other people in the paper industry. In 1938, Southland Paper Mills near Lufkin, Texas, was organized, the first Southern newsprint paper mill. The mill site was named in honor of Herty.

Although Herty's major interest between 1928 and 1938 was the development of a Southern paper and pulp industry, he also was interested in other uses of cellulose. A byproduct of his work at the Savannah Pulp and Paper Laboratory was his finding that sulphite pine pulp is high in alpha cellulose from which is made rayon.

For the years 1927-1929 there is correspondence about forestry conservation and cellulose. Herty was promoting fundamental research in cellulose and its industrial potential for the South. Correspondents include Allen Abrams of Marathon Paper Mills, Dr. Harold Hibbert of McGill University, Dr. A. B. Recknagel of Cornell University, and Dr. R. S. Kellogg of the Newsprint Service Bureau.

In 1929, Herty corresponded with Dr. Gustavus J. Esselen, Jr. of Skinner, Sherman and Esselen, Inc. concerning his running tests on slash pine pulp. In 1930 and 1931 Herty made the same request of the International Paper Company, the Oxford Paper Company, the Castanea Paper Company, Knight and Clarke Analytical and Consulting Chemists and Caro-Una Fibre Company. Much of the correspondence for these years deals with the results of the tests. The rest of the correspondence concerns the generally enthusiastic public response to Herty's promotion of the industrial possibilities of cellulose and especially of southern pine for newsprint paper.

The section pertaining to the Savannah Pulp and Paper Laboratory, which became the Herty Foundation Laboratory in 1938, contain relatively little correspondence concerning the laboratory. Most of the correspondence deals with its establishment in 1932 and with Herty's public relations work as director. In 1931 and 1932, Herty was on the Advisory Committee of the U. S. Timber Conservation Board. These files contain mostly correspondence, memoranda, and reports from 1931-1932.

The Pine Institute of America, Inc. section contains correspondence from 1925-1933. The Institute was an organization set up by naval stores people to promote fundamental research in naval stores matters. .

The remainder of the files contain papers about individual naval stores, forestry, and paper and pulp-related associations, organizations, conferences and celebrations; miscellaneous papers about forestry and forest products (excluding naval stores); samples of wood pulp and other papers; and a turpentine pot created by Herty for his cup and gutter system.

Related materials can be found in the following series: Series 2: Academic Career; Series 3: American Chemical Society; Series 5: Agriculture and Natural Resources; Series 9: Industrial Consultant Work; Series 12: Personal Papers, Mementoes and Memorabilia; Series 13: Notebooks; and Series 15: Photographs.

Naval Stores General Correspondence, 1900-1938
Box Folder Content
38 1 1900
38 2 1901
38 3 1902
38 4 1903
38 5 1904
38 6 1905
38 7 1906
38 8 January-April, 1907
38 9 May-August, 1907
38 10 September-December, 1907 and undated
38 11 1908
38 12 1909
38 13 1910
38 14 1911
39 1 January-May, 1912
39 2 June-December, 1912
39 3 1913-1914
39 4 1915
39 5 1916-1917
39 6 1918-1919
39 7 1920-1925
39 8 1926-1927
39 9 1928-1929
39 10 1930-1931
39 11 1932-1933; 1935-1938; undated
Turpentine Operators
39 12 Correspondence: 1902
39 13 Correspondence: January-February, 1903
40 1 Correspondence: March-April, 1903
40 2 Correspondence: May-October, 1903
40 3 Correspondence: November-December, 1903
40 4 Correspondence: 1904-l905
Cup and Gutter System
40 5 Equipment. Correspondence: 1901
40 6 Equipment. Correspondence: January-July, 1902
40 7 Equipment. Correspondence: August-October, 1902
40 8 Equipment. Correspondence: November-December, 1902
Chattanooga Pottery Company
40 9 Correspondence, 1902
40 10 Correspondence, January-February, 1903
40 11 Correspondence, March-September, 1903
40 12 Correspondence, October-December, 1903 and undated
40 13 Correspondence, January-May, 1904
40 14 Correspondence, June, 1904
40 15 Correspondence, July, 1904
41 1 Correspondence, August, 1904
41 2 Correspondence, September-October, 1904
41 3 Correspondence, November-December, 1904 and undated
41 4 Correspondence, January-February, 1905
41 5 Correspondence, March-April, 1905
41 6 Correspondence, May-June, 1905
41 7 Correspondence, July-August, 1905
41 8 Correspondence, September-December, 1905 and undated
41 9 Correspondence, January-May, 1906
41 10 Correspondence, June-December, 1906
41 11 Correspondence, January-May, 1907
41 12 Correspondence, June-September, 1907
41 13 Correspondence, October-December, 1907 and undated
42 1 Correspondence, January-July, 1908
42 2 Correspondence, August-December, 1908 and undated
42 3 Correspondence, January-August, 1909
42 4 Correspondence, September-December, 1909
42 5 Correspondence, 1903; 1904; 1906-1909
42 6 Legal papers: 1902; 1904; 1906
42 7 Miscellaneous papers: 1905; 1909; undated
Herty Turpentine Cup Company
42 8 Correspondence: 1910
42 9 Correspondence: 1911
42 10 Correspondence: January-August, 1912
42 11 Correspondence: September-December, 1912
42 12 Correspondence: 1913-1914
42 13 Correspondence: 1915-1918
42 14 Correspondence: 1919-1921
42 15 Correspondence: 1922-1926
42 16 Correspondence: 1927-1938
43 1 Financial Papers: 1910-1913; 1915; 1917-1919
43 2 Financial Papers: 1920-1923
43 3 Financial Papers: 1924-1926
43 4 Financial Papers: 1935-1936
43 5 Legal Papers: 1924
43 6 Suit vs. Baker Cup and Gutter Company, Miscellaneous Papers: 1911-1913
43 7 Miscellaneous Papers: 1934; undated
Naval Stores. Patents
43 8 Processes and Apparatus for the Destructive Distillation of Wood and for the Recovery and Purification of Wood Distillation Products Such as Rosin and Turpentine. Patents: 1860; 1864-1865; 1867; 1869; 1871; 1873; 1876; 1882-1883; 1888; 1892-1895; 1899-1903; 1906
43 9 Processes and Apparatus for the Destructive Distillation of Wood and for the Recovery and Purification of Wood Distillation Products Such as Rosin and Turpentine. Patents: 1909-1913
43 10 Processes and Apparatus for the Destructive Distillation of Wood and for the Recovery and Purification of Wood Distillation Products Such as Rosin and Turpentine. Patents: 1914
43 11 Processes and Apparatus for the Destructive Distillation of Wood and for the Recovery and Purification of Wood Distillation Products Such as Rosin and Turpentine. Patents: 1915-1919
43 12 Processes and Apparatus for the Destructive Distillation of Wood and for the Recovery and Purification of Wood Distillation Products Such as Rosin and Turpentine. Patents: 1920-1925
44 1 Processes and Apparatus for the Destructive Distillation of Wood and for the Recovery and Purification of Wood Distillation Products Such as Rosin and Turpentine. Patents: 1926-1928; 1933
44 2 Processes and Apparatus for the Manufacture of Soap, Lacquer and Other Products From Pine Oil and Rosin. Patents: 1888; 1899; 1910-1912; 1914-1915; 1928; 1935
44 3 Processes of Hydrogenating Carbon Compounds. Patents: 1916; 1918; 1920-1921; 1926
44 4 Turpentine Boxes, Cups, Gutters, and Other Turpentine Collecting Apparatus. Patents: 1868-1871; 1875-1876; 1881; 1893-1894; 1896; 1898; 1902-1908
44 5 Turpentine Boxes, Cups, Gutters, and Other Turpentine Collecting Apparatus. Patents: 1909-1919; 1921; 1928; 1930-1936
44 6 Turpentine Hacks, Scrapers, and Other Cutting Tools. Patents: 1872-1874; 1878; 1883; 1885; 1893; 1896-1897; 1907-1917; 1925; 1929; 1931-1933; 1938
Synthetic Camphor
44 7 Correspondence: 1902; 1915-1919; 1921; 1926; 1929-1931; 1934
44 8 Miscellaneous Papers: 1915; 1918; 1930; 1935; undated
Naval Stores Miscellaneous Papers
44 9 Miscellaneous Papers: 1878; 1895; 1900-1904; 1907-1916
44 10 Miscellaneous Papers: 1918; 1920-1921; 1923; 1927-1930; 1934; undated
44 11 Naval Stores and wood distillation products. U. S. government publications: 1893; 1903; 1906-1909; 1911-1913
45 1 Naval Stores and wood distillation products. U. S. government publications: 1915; 1917; 1919-1924; 1927; 1929-1930 1932
45 2 Gamble's Naval Stores Year Book: 1926-1930
45 3 Gamble's Naval Stores Year Book: 1930-1933
U. S. Bureau of Forestry
45 4 Correspondence: 1901
45 5 Correspondence: January, 1902
45 6 Correspondence: February-May, 1902
45 7 Correspondence: June-August, 1902
45 8 Correspondence: September-December, 1902 and undated
46 1 Correspondence: January, 1903
46 2 Correspondence: February, 1903
46 3 Correspondence: March, 1903
46 4 Correspondence: April, 1903
46 5 Correspondence: May-June, 1903
46 6 Correspondence: July-September, 1903
46 7 Correspondence: October, 1903
46 8 Correspondence: November, 1903
46 9 Correspondence: December, 1903
46 10 Correspondence: January, 1904
46 11 Correspondence: February, 1904
47 1 Correspondence: March, 1904
47 2 Correspondence: April-May, 1904
47 3 Correspondence: June-December, 1904 and undated
47 4 Correspondence: January-May, 1905
47 5 Correspondence: June-December, 1905 and undated
47 6 Logbooks: 1903
47 7 Travel and Field Expenses: 1901; 1903-1904
47 8 Correspondence: January-May, 1906
47 9 Correspondence: June-August, 1906
47 10 Correspondence: September-December, 1906 and undated
48 1 Correspondence: January-May, 1907
48 2 Correspondence: June-December, 1907
48 3 Correspondence: January-July, 1908
48 4 Correspondence: August-December 1908
48 5 Correspondence: 1909
48 6 Correspondence: January-April, 1910
48 7 Correspondence: May-December, 1910
48 8 Correspondence: 1911
48 9 Correspondence: 1912
48 10 Correspondence: 1913-1914
48 11 Correspondence: 1915
48 12 Correspondence: 1916-1917
49 1 Correspondence: 1918-1922
49 2 National Conference on Utilization of Forest Products. Correspondence: 1924-1925
49 3 National Conference on Utilization of Forest Products. Miscellaneous Papers: 1924-1925
49 4 Correspondence: 1926
49 5 Correspondence: 1927
49 6 Correspondence: 1928
49 7 Correspondence: 1929
U. S. Forest Service
49 8 Correspondence: January-April, 1930
49 9 Correspondence: May-December, 1930
49 10 Correspondence: 1931
49 11 Correspondence: 1933-1934; 1937
49 12 Report of the Forester: 1924-1928; 1930
50 1 Annual Report and Program of the Southern Forest Experiment Station: 1928-1929
Georgia Forest Service
50 2 Correspondence: 1928; 1930-1931
50 3 Bulletins, Leaflets, Reports: 1926-1929
50 4 Bulletins, Leaflets, Reports: 1930-1931
Florida Forest Service
50 5 Correspondence: 1929-1931
50 6 Florida Forests and Forestry. Miscellaneous Papers: 1916; 1926; 1930-1931
Other State Forest Services
50 7 Correspondence: 1929-1931
Forestry and Paper and Pulp Production, Correspondence
50 8 1913; 1915-1916; 1923
50 9 1927-1928
50 10 January-May, 1929
50 11 June-December, 1929
50 12 January-April, 1930
50 13 May-October, 1930
51 1 November-December, undated, 1930
51 2 January-February, 1931
51 3 March-April, 1931
51 4 May-July, 1931
51 5 August-September, 1931
51 6 October-December, 1931
Savannah Pulp and Paper Laboratory
51 7 Proposed Savannah Pulp and Paper Laboratory. Correspondence: 1931
51 8 Correspondence: 1932
51 9 Correspondence: 1933-1934
51 10 Correspondence: 1935-1936
51 11 Correspondence: 1937-1938
51 12 Miscellaneous Papers: 1931; 1935-1936
51 13 Miscellaneous Papers: undated
U. S. Timber Conservation Board
52 1 Correspondence: January-July, 1931
52 2 Correspondence: August-December, 1931
52 3 Correspondence: 1931
52 4 Memoranda, Reports, and Statements: 1931
52 5 Memoranda, Minutes, and Miscellaneous Papers: 1932 and undated
52 6 Progress Reports of the Taxation Inquiry: 1929; 1931
Pine Institute of America, Inc., Correspondence
52 7 1925-1926
52 8 1927
52 9 1928
53 1 1929
53 2 1930-1933
Industrial Fellowship
53 3 Progress Report: 1926
53 4 Progress Reports: January-May, 1927
53 5 Progress Reports: June-December, 1927
53 6 Progress Reports: 1928-1929
53 7 Special Reports: 1927
53 8 Annual Report: 1928
53 9 Miscellaneous Papers: 1926-1929
Organizations, Conferences and Celebrations
53 10 American Forestry Association. Correspondence: 1905; 1915-1916; 1920-1924; 1926-1931; 1935-1937
53 11 American Paper and Pulp Association. Correspondence: 1918; 1928-1932 1937
53 12 American Pulp and Paper Mill Superintendents Association. Correspondence: 1929
53 13 Canadian Pulp and Paper Association. Correspondence: 1929; 1931-1932
53 14 Florida Commercial Forestry Conference. Correspondence: 1931-1932
53 15 Florida Industries Day. Correspondence: 1937-1938
53 16 Florida Industries Day. Symposium on the Southern Paper Industry: 1938
53 17 Georgia Commercial Forestry Conference. Correspondence: 1930
53 18 Georgia Commercial Forestry Congress. Proceedings: 1930
53 19 Georgia Forest Association. Correspondence: 1907-1908
53 20 Georgia Forestry Association. Correspondence: 1930-1936
54 1 Institute of Paper Chemistry. Correspondence: 1931
54 2 Meeting of Southern Foresters. Correspondence and Program: 1918-1919
54 3 National Association of State Foresters. Annual Meeting Program: 1931
54 4 National Conservation Association. Correspondence: 1910
54 5 National Conservation Commission. Bulletins: 1908
54 6 National Conservation Congress. Correspondence: 1910-1912; 1916
54 7 National Wood Chemical Association. Papers: 1917
54 8 North Carolina Forestry Association. Correspondence: 1912-1913; 1925
54 9 Society of American Foresters. Correspondence: 1905; 1911-1916; 1931-1935; 1937
54 10 South Carolina Commercial Forestry Conference. Correspondence: 1930-1931
54 11 Southern Forestry Congress. Correspondence: 1916-1917
54 12 Southern Newspaper Publishers' Association. Correspondence: 1930-1931
54 13 Southern Newspaper Publishers' Association. Miscellaneous Papers: 1931
54 14 Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry. Correspondence: 1918-1919; 1931-1933; 1937
54 15 Turpentine and Rosin Producers Association. Correspondence: 1918; 1926-1927
54 16 Turpentine Operators' Association. Correspondence: 1901-1903; 1909
54 17 Emily Woodward and the Vienna News. Correspondence: 1929-1938, undated
Forestry and Forest Products. Miscellaneous Papers
54 18 Cellulose. U. S. Government Publications: 1927-1928; 1930
54 19 Farm Forestry. U. S. Department of Agriculture Publications: 1926-1932
54 20 Forestry and Forest Products. Miscellaneous Papers: 1920; 1925; 1928-1931
54 21 Forestry-Geological Review: 1932-1934
54 22 Georgia Forest Lookout: 1931
54 23 Pine Trees and Forests. U. S. Department of Agriculture Publications: 1916; 1925-1926; 1928-1931
55 1 Pine Cones Extension Forestry News: 1930-1931, undated
55 2 Pulp and Paper. Miscellaneous Papers: 1913; 1924-1925; 1928-1929
55 3 Pulp and Paper. Miscellaneous Papers: 1930-1935, undated
55 4 Wood Preservation. U. S. Forest Service Publications: 1907; 1911-1913
Wood Pulp Paper Samples
55 5 Wood pulp paper of British make, as used in Georgia, 1794, 1 sample; wood pulp paper made in Georgia, 1861-1865, 1 sample
55 6 Wood pulp papers made in Georgia, 1863-1864, 4 samples
55 7 Pine pulp paper from wood near Gainesville, Fla., circa 1916, 1 sample
55 8 Yellow pine [?] pulp paper bleached with city water of Valdosta, Va., 1929, 1 sample
55 9 Wood pulp papers, 1929, 3 samples
55 10 Bagasse pulp paper, 1929, 1 sample
55 11 Spruce pulp paper made by Castanea Paper Company, 1930, 4 samples
55 12 Longleaf pine pulp paper made by Castanea Paper Company, 1930, 4 samples
55 13 Kraft paper made in Panama City, Fla., April 18, 1931, 1 sample
55 14 Jack pine pulp papers made through ammonium bisulphite process and calcium bisulphite process by Marathon Paper Mills Company, 1931, 2 samples
55 15 Newsprint paper made from loblolly pine pulp at Savannah Pulp and Paper Laboratory, 1932, 1 sample
55 16 Unbleached kraft paper from loblolly pine pulp (Savannah Pulp and Paper Laboratory (?), circa 1932-1938], 1 sample
55 17 Black gum sulphite pulp papers [Savannah Pulp and Paper Laboratory (?), circa 1932-1938], 4 samples
55 18 Wrapping paper from chlorine bleached pine sulphate pulp [Savannah Pulp and Paper Laboratory, circa 1932-1938], 1 sample
55 19 Writing paper from 80 percent bleached longleaf pine sulphate pulp and 20 percent aspen soda pulp [Savannah Pulp and Paper Laboratory (?), circa 1932-1938], 1 sample
55 20 Bond paper from 85 percent longleaf pine sulphate and 15 percent soda pulp [Savannah Pulp and Paper Laboratory, (?), 1932-1938], 1 sample
55 21 Bond paper from 68 percent bleached longleaf pine sulphate, 23 percent bleached black gum sulphite and 9 percent bleached soda pulp [Savannah Pulp and Paper Laboratory (?), circa 1932-1932], 1 sample
55 22 Book or bond paper from 37 1/2 percent bleached pine sulphate Pulp, 37 1/2 percent broke, and 25 per cent soda pulp [Savannah Pulp and Paper Laboratory (?), circa 1932-1938], 1 sample
55 23 Book paper from 50 percent loblolly pine sulphate and 50 percent soda pulp [Savannah Pulp and Paper Laboratory, circa 1932-1932], 1 sample
55 24 Bond paper from 80 percent bleached longleaf pine sulphate and 20 percent soda pulp [Savannah Pulp and Paper Laboratory (?), circa 1932-1938], 1 sample
55 25 Book or printing paper from 70 percent bleached longleaf pine sulphate, 22 per cent bleached soda pulp and 8 percent bleached rag stock [Savannah Pulp and Paper Laboratory, circa 1932-1938], 1 sample
55 26 Book, bond, writing or high grade print paper from 60 percent bleached longleaf pine sulphate, 15 percent bleached black gum sulphite, and 25 percent bleached chestnut soda [Savannah Pulp and Paper Laboratory (?), circa 1932-1938], 1 sample
55 27 Unbleached kraft made from loblolly pine by modified process [Savannah Pulp and Paper Laboratory (?), circa 1932-1938], 1 sample
55 28 Mississippi pine pulp paper, 1932, 1 sample
55 29 Papers from flax, hemp and okra pulps treated with caustic and bleach, 1937, 3 samples
55 30 Longleaf pine pulp paper, undated, 4 samples
55 31 Spruce pulp paper, undated, 4 samples
Artifacts
145 - Turpentine pot created by Charles Herty
Glass negatives
146 - Glass negatives
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