HOSTER, JOHN L.
John L. Hoster diary, 1862-1865

Emory University

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/8zfw4


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Hoster, John L.
Title: John L. Hoster diary, 1862-1865
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 464
Extent: 1 bound volume (BV)
Abstract:Transcript of the diary of Union soldier John L. Hoster, who served in the 148th New York Infantry Regiment during the Civil War.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Unrestricted access.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Source

Gift, 1965.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], John L. Hoster diary, Manuscript, Archives and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Processed by MRD, July 1965.


Collection Description

Biographical Note

John L. Hoster enlisted August 11, 1862 and was a private and sergeant, Company B, 148th New York Infantry Regiment. He was from near Seneca Falls, New York. He served in 1862 and 1863 in the Portsmouth-Suffolk, Virginia area. Early in 1864 he went to the Virginia Peninsula. He was in the Wilderness fighting May 1864, and at Second Cold Harbor, June 3, 1864. He was captured June 15, 1864, and sent to Andersonville, where he remained until September 8, 1864. On leaving Andersonville he went to Charleston, Florence, South Carolina, and Goldsboro, North Carolina. He was exchanged near Wilmington, North Carolina on February 27, 1865. In March of 1865 he went to Elmira, New York, and then home.

Scope and Content Note

The collection consists of a bound typescript copy (137 pages) of the diary of John L. Hoster with entries between September 22, 1862 and April 14, 1865. Hoster's diary chronicles his military service and imprisonment (June - September 1864), his move to Charleston and Florence, South Carolina, then to Goldsboro, North Carolina, and his exchange near Wilmington, North Carolina.

There are regular daily entries, some of considerable fullness, during the months at Andersonville, giving details about food, health, morale, and general treatment at Andersonville. His comments are restrained and remarkably detached. He thought Savannah a pretty place and was grateful to the citizens of Charleston for their kindness to the prisoners, particularly the sick.


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