JONES, MADISON, 1925-
Madison Jones papers, 1950-1989

Emory University

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/8zhm7


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Jones, Madison, 1925-
Title: Madison Jones papers, 1950-1989
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 684
Extent: 6.5 linear ft. (15 boxes)
Abstract:Papers of author and educator Madison Jones, including corrected typescripts, manuscript notebooks, and preliminary drafts.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Unrestricted access.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

Special restrictions apply: No reproduction of any unpublished manuscripts, without the written permission of the author.

Source

Purchase, 1990.

Custodial History

Floyd C. Watkins American Literary Manuscripts Collection.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], Madison Jones papers, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Processed by Barbara J. Mann, August 1990.


Collection Description

Biographical Note

Madison Percy Jones, Jr. was born March 21, 1925 in Nashville, Tennessee, to Madison Percy and Mary Temple (Webber) Jones. He attended Nashville public elementary schools, Wallace Preparatory School, and Montgomery Bell Academy. Jones enrolled at Vanderbilt University, but dropped out after two academic quarters. He stayed out of school for a year and a half re-evaluating his life and working on the family farm, Sycamore Farm. His freshman English teacher had praised his abilities to write and during this time off he thought about the possibility of being a writer.

Jones re-enrolled at Vanderbilt and took an advanced composition course taught by Donald Davidson, a member of the Vanderbilt Agrarian Movement and one of the original members of the Fugitives, a Vanderbilt-connected group of poets that also included John Crowe Ransom, Allen Tate, and Robert Penn Warren. Davidson both praised and critiqued Jones's writing and became a respected friend. Madison Jones graduated with an A.B. in 1949.

After graduating from Vanderbilt, he entered the University of Florida. He chose this university in order to take courses in creative writing with Andrew Lytle, novelist, short-story writer and another member of the Vanderbilt Agrarian Movement. Jones graduated in 1951 with a M.A. and began coursework on his Ph.D., attending the University of Florida from 1951-1953. Although he completed his coursework, he never wrote his dissertation.

Jones became an Instructor of English at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, from 1953-1954. The next year he received a one year Sewanee Review fellowship which enabled him to return to the south. He moved to Florida and began full-time work on his first novel, The Innocent. Upon completion of the fellowship he moved to Knoxville, and spent a year as Instructor of English at the University of Tennessee.

After his year at the University of Tennessee, Jones decided he wanted to move further south and accepted a position as Assistant Professor of English at Auburn University in Auburn, Alabama. He remained at Auburn for the rest of his teaching career, becoming Professor of English and Alumni Writer-in-Residence, 1968-1987, Distinguished Faculty Lecturer in 1980, and Professor of English, Emeritus, and University Writer-in-Residence, Emeritus, 1987-.

Jones has written eight novels: The Innocents (Harcourt Brace and Company, 1957), Forest of the Night (Harcourt, Brace, and Company, 1960), A Buried Land (Viking Press, 1963), An Exile, (Viking Press, 1967), A Cry of Absence (Crown Publishers, 1971), Passage Through Gehanna (Louisiana State University Press, 1978), Season of the Strangler (Doubleday and Company, 1982), and Last Things (Louisiana State University Press, 1989). An Exile was made into a film by Columbia Pictures entitled I Walk the Line. This film was released in 1970 and starred Gregory Peck, Tuesday Weld, and Johnny Cash. I Walk the Line was also published in book form (Popular Library, 1970).

Other writings by Madison Jones include History of the Tennessee State Dental Association (Tennessee State Dental Association, 1958), short stories published in Perspective, Sewanee Review, Arlington Quarterly, and Delta Review, and writings published in anthologies including "Homecoming" and "Dog Days" in Best American Short Stories (edited by Martha Foley, 1953) and "Fugitive" in Stories of the Modern South (edited by Benjamin Forkner and Patrick Samway, 1986).

Madison Jones has also been the recipient of other fellowships and honors including the Alabama Library Association Book Award (1968), Rockefeller Foundation fellowship (1968), Guggenheim fellowship (1973), member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers, and member of the Alabama Academy of Distinguished Authors.

Madison Jones married Shailah McEvilley of Cincinnati, Ohio, February 5, 1951. They have five children: Carroll, Madison III, Ellen, Michael, and Andrew. The Jones family resides in Auburn.

Biographical Source: Sources used to compile this biographical note include Contemporary Authors, Vol. 13-16 First Revision (Detroit: Gale Research Company, 1975) and Contemporary Authors: New Revision Series, Vol. 7 (Detroit: Gale Research Company, 1982).

Madison Percy Jones, Jr. was born March 21, 1925 in Nashville, Tennessee, to Madison Percy and Mary Temple (Webber) Jones. He attended Nashville public elementary schools, Wallace Preparatory School, and Montgomery Bell Academy. Jones enrolled at Vanderbilt University, but dropped out after two academic quarters. He stayed out of school for a year and a half re-evaluating his life and working on the family farm, Sycamore Farm. His freshman English teacher had praised his abilities to write and during this time off he thought about the possibility of being a writer.

Jones re-enrolled at Vanderbilt and took an advanced composition course taught by Donald Davidson, a member of the Vanderbilt Agrarian Movement and one of the original members of the Fugitives, a Vanderbilt-connected group of poets that also included John Crowe Ransom, Allen Tate, and Robert Penn Warren. Davidson both praised and critiqued Jones's writing and became a respected friend. Madison Jones graduated with an A.B. in 1949.

After graduating from Vanderbilt, he entered the University of Florida. He chose this university in order to take courses in creative writing with Andrew Lytle, novelist, short-story writer and another member of the Vanderbilt Agrarian Movement. Jones graduated in 1951 with a M.A. and began coursework on his Ph.D., attending the University of Florida from 1951-1953. Although he completed his coursework, he never wrote his dissertation.

Jones became an Instructor of English at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, from 1953-1954. The next year he received a one year Sewanee Review fellowship which enabled him to return to the south. He moved to Florida and began full-time work on his first novel, The Innocent. Upon completion of the fellowship he moved to Knoxville, and spent a year as Instructor of English at the University of Tennessee.

After his year at the University of Tennessee, Jones decided he wanted to move further south and accepted a position as Assistant Professor of English at Auburn University in Auburn, Alabama. He remained at Auburn for the rest of his teaching career, becoming Professor of English and Alumni Writer-in-Residence, 1968-1987, Distinguished Faculty Lecturer in 1980, and Professor of English, Emeritus, and University Writer-in-Residence, Emeritus, 1987-.

Jones has written eight novels: The Innocents (Harcourt Brace and Company, 1957), Forest of the Night (Harcourt, Brace, and Company, 1960), A Buried Land (Viking Press, 1963), An Exile, (Viking Press, 1967), A Cry of Absence (Crown Publishers, 1971), Passage Through Gehanna (Louisiana State University Press, 1978), Season of the Strangler (Doubleday and Company, 1982), and Last Things (Louisiana State University Press, 1989). An Exile was made into a film by Columbia Pictures entitled I Walk the Line. This film was released in 1970 and starred Gregory Peck, Tuesday Weld, and Johnny Cash. I Walk the Line was also published in book form (Popular Library, 1970).

Other writings by Madison Jones include History of the Tennessee State Dental Association (Tennessee State Dental Association, 1958), short stories published in Perspective, Sewanee Review, Arlington Quarterly, and Delta Review, and writings published in anthologies including "Homecoming" and "Dog Days" in Best American Short Stories (edited by Martha Foley, 1953) and "Fugitive" in Stories of the Modern South (edited by Benjamin Forkner and Patrick Samway, 1986).

Madison Jones has also been the recipient of other fellowships and honors including the Alabama Library Association Book Award (1968), Rockefeller Foundation fellowship (1968), Guggenheim fellowship (1973), member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers, and member of the Alabama Academy of Distinguished Authors.

Madison Jones married Shailah McEvilley of Cincinnati, Ohio, February 5, 1951. They have five children: Carroll, Madison III, Ellen, Michael, and Andrew. The Jones family resides in Auburn.

Biographical Source: Sources used to compile this biographical note include Contemporary Authors, Vol. 13-16 First Revision (Detroit: Gale Research Company, 1975) and Contemporary Authors: New Revision Series, Vol. 7 (Detroit: Gale Research Company, 1982).

Scope and Content Note

The collection consists of the papers of Madison Jones from 1950-1989. The papers include materials relating to the writing and publishing of his novels, including corrected typescripts, manuscript notebooks, and correspondence, and preliminary drafts. The rest of the collection consists of a copy of Madison Jones's vita, two financial documents, and a short story written by Scarlett Robinson. Among the earliest materials found in this collection are manuscript drafts of his second novel, Forest of the Night, published in 1960, and manuscript drafts and corrected typescripts of his third novel, A Buried Land, published in 1963. Jones's first novel, The Innocents, published in 1957, is not represented. Corrected typescripts of his last published novel, Last Things, published in 1989, and a photocopied typescript of Jones's autobiography are also included in the collection.

Arrangement Note

Organized into three series: (1) Writings, (2) Correspondence, and (3) Personal materials.


Selected Search Terms

Personal Names

Corporate Names

Topical Terms

Form/Genre Terms

Occupation


Description of Series

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