LOGUE, CHRISTOPHER, 1926-
Christopher Logue collection, 1945-2001

Emory University

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/8zkfr

Collection Stored Off-Site

All or portions of this collection are housed off-site. Materials can still be requested but researchers should expect a delay of up to two business days for retrieval.


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Logue, Christopher, 1926-
Title: Christopher Logue collection, 1945-2001
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 992
Extent: 11.5 linear ft. (23 boxes) and 6 oversized papers (OP)
Abstract:Personal and literary papers of British author Christopher Logue, including correspondence, literary notebooks, literary manuscripts, and collected printed material.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Collection stored off-site. Researchers must contact the Rose Library in advance to access this collection.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Related Materials in Other Repositories

Christopher Logue papers, The Pennsylvania State University, University Libraries, Special Collections Library, Rare Books and Manuscripts.

Source

Gift, 2004.

Custodial History

Originally received as part of the Raymond Danowski Poetry Library.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], Christopher Logue collection, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Processed by Steve Schessler, January 24, 2007.


Collection Description

Biographical Note

Christopher Logue was born in Portsmouth, England, on November 23, 1926, to John Dominic and Molly Logue. Logue attended two Catholic schools and then Portsmouth Grammar School. He volunteered for the Army in 1943, serving first with the Army Commandos in St. Ives, Cornwall, and then with the Royal Highland Regiment (Black Watch) from 1944-1948 in the Middle East. While in Binyamina, Palestine, Logue was charged with illegal possession of six Army Books 64 (identity documents and/or pay books issued to other ranks), and subsequently imprisoned for two years.

Logue brought W.H. Auden's Selected Poems, the complete Shakespeare, and a selection of Wilde into prison. Following his release, he began his attempts to become a poet. Logue immersed himself in the work of Ezra Pound and entered London's literary circle. Eventually growing dispirited with London, Logue left for Paris in 1951, and remained for five years. During this period he published work in Merlin, and received encouragement from Samuel Beckett, a fellow Merlin contributor. Logue's Leftist political leanings formed in Paris, and led Logue to Berlin to see Bertolt Brecht, the "only writer," in his estimation, "who could use political things without strain." Brecht advised Logue to return to London, learn German, and return for an apprenticeship; Brecht's death a few months later left Logue in London to stay. When he returned to London in 1956, Logue re-entered the cultural and political scene, raising political consciousness through his "poster poems" and developing works in "jazzetry" (collaborations of poetry and jazz).

Logue began writing plays at this time, with The Trial of Cob and Leach (1959) and Antigone (1960), the latter a work that would belie Logue's talent with free adaptation and rewriting of classic works. With the translations and support of Donald Carne-Ross, Logue began his Iliad series, publishing Patrocleia in 1962. Logue would continue to translate books of the Iliad with early help from the Bollingen Foundation and revise his work for the next forty years, publishing individual books and then grouping them under the name War Music. Throughout the 1960s, Logue alternated his ongoing classical work with light comic productions, acting roles, a satirical column in Private Eye, and lyric poetry. Logue increased his variety of work in the 1970s with children's books, screenplays, stage plays, and the production of War Music as a "music drama." He moved from radio production to television with his Edible Gold series, a selection of poems to be read sporadically on BBC channels, and further brought his work into the public sphere with song-writing, newspaper publications, and frequent poetry readings. Biographical Source: Contemporary Authors Online, Thomson Gale 2006; Dictionary of Literary Biography, Volume 27: Poets of Great Britain and Ireland, 1945-1960, ed. Vincent B. Sherry, Jr. The Gale Group, 1984.

Christopher Logue was born in Portsmouth, England, on November 23, 1926, to John Dominic and Molly Logue. Logue attended two Catholic schools and then Portsmouth Grammar School. He volunteered for the Army in 1943, serving first with the Army Commandos in St. Ives, Cornwall, and then with the Royal Highland Regiment (Black Watch) from 1944-1948 in the Middle East. While in Binyamina, Palestine, Logue was charged with illegal possession of six Army Books 64 (identity documents and/or pay books issued to other ranks), and subsequently imprisoned for two years.

Logue brought W.H. Auden's Selected Poems, the complete Shakespeare, and a selection of Wilde into prison. Following his release, he began his attempts to become a poet. Logue immersed himself in the work of Ezra Pound and entered London's literary circle. Eventually growing dispirited with London, Logue left for Paris in 1951, and remained for five years. During this period he published work in Merlin, and received encouragement from Samuel Beckett, a fellow Merlin contributor. Logue's Leftist political leanings formed in Paris, and led Logue to Berlin to see Bertolt Brecht, the "only writer," in his estimation, "who could use political things without strain." Brecht advised Logue to return to London, learn German, and return for an apprenticeship; Brecht's death a few months later left Logue in London to stay. When he returned to London in 1956, Logue re-entered the cultural and political scene, raising political consciousness through his "poster poems" and developing works in "jazzetry" (collaborations of poetry and jazz).

Logue began writing plays at this time, with The Trial of Cob and Leach (1959) and Antigone (1960), the latter a work that would belie Logue's talent with free adaptation and rewriting of classic works. With the translations and support of Donald Carne-Ross, Logue began his Iliad series, publishing Patrocleia in 1962. Logue would continue to translate books of the Iliad with early help from the Bollingen Foundation and revise his work for the next forty years, publishing individual books and then grouping them under the name War Music. Throughout the 1960s, Logue alternated his ongoing classical work with light comic productions, acting roles, a satirical column in Private Eye, and lyric poetry. Logue increased his variety of work in the 1970s with children's books, screenplays, stage plays, and the production of War Music as a "music drama." He moved from radio production to television with his Edible Gold series, a selection of poems to be read sporadically on BBC channels, and further brought his work into the public sphere with song-writing, newspaper publications, and frequent poetry readings. Biographical Source: Contemporary Authors Online, Thomson Gale 2006; Dictionary of Literary Biography, Volume 27: Poets of Great Britain and Ireland, 1945-1960, ed. Vincent B. Sherry, Jr. The Gale Group, 1984.

Scope and Content Note

The collection consists of the personal and literary papers of Christopher Logue from around 1945 to 2001. The papers include correspondence, literary notebooks, literary manuscripts, and collected printed material. The papers include typescripts of many published works and selections from projects Logue edited. Of particular note are extensive manuscripts and background materials for Logue's War Music collections, and publishing correspondence for some of his major works. The collection includes early journals and notebooks, musical arrangements, and unpublished poetry and screenplays.

Arrangement Note

Organized into five series: (1) Correspondence, (2) Works by Logue, (3) Works by others, (4) Printed material, and (5) Other papers.


Selected Search Terms

Personal Names

Topical Terms

Form/Genre Terms

Occupation


Description of Series

v1.11.0-dev