MILLER, FLOURNOY E., 1886-1971.
Flournoy E. Miller papers, 1924-1995

Emory University

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/8znr6


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Miller, Flournoy E., 1886-1971.
Title: Flournoy E. Miller papers, 1924-1995
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 1002
Extent: 3.25 linear ft. (7 boxes), 9 oversized papers (OP), 1 bound volume (BV), 1 oversized bound volume (OBV), and AV Masters: .25 linear ft.
Abstract:Papers of Flournoy Miller, African American actor, entertainer and playwright, and his daughter Olivette Miller, jazz harpist. Papers include photographs, printed material relating to productions, lyrics, drafts of scripts, correspondence, scores, sheet music, and scrapbooks.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Unrestricted access.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Related Materials in Other Repositories

Flournoy Miller collection, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York Public Library.

Source

Purchase, 2004.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], Flournoy E. Miller papers, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Sarah Quigley, 2011


Collection Description

Biographical Note

Flournoy E. Miller, African-American actor, comedian, playwright, lyricist, and producer, was born in Columbia, Tennessee on April 14, 1887. While attending Fisk University in Nashville, he started his entertainment career, joining with his childhood friend, Aubrey Lyles, to form a 25-year partnership in 1903. They performed in college theatricals, and in 1907, Miller and Lyles were offered their first professional positions as playwrights for the Pekin Theater Stock Company in Chicago, Illinois. While there, they co-wrote their first play, "The Mayor of Dixie." In 1907, they also wrote "The Oyster Man" for Ernest Hogan, who starred in the musical until his death in 1909. In 1915, they starred in "Darkydom," which entered them into stardom and was the first major black musical comedy.

Their biggest success came in 1921, when they joined with Eubie Blake and Noble Sissle to write and produce "Shuffle Along." After the closing of "Shuffle Along" in 1924, they produced a variety of musical comedies, including "Runnin' Wild" (1924) and "Rang Tang" (1927). After the successful run of their production "Keep Shufflin'" (1928), Miller and Lyles broke up. Miller went on to write and appear in Lew Leslie's "Blackbirds" in 1930. In the following year, the team reunited and produced "Sugar Hill" with James P. Johnson.

After Aubrey Lyles' death in 1932, Miller teamed up with comedian Mantan Moreland, and they toured the vaudeville circuits. They appeared together in the motion picture, "Harlem on the Prairie," the first all-Black western. In the 1950s, Miller wrote for the television show, "Amos and Andy."

Flournoy E. Miller died in Hollywood, California on June 6, 1971. He and wife, Bessie Miller, had one daughter, Olivette, who was a renowned jazz harpist in Chicago, Illinois in the 1940s and 1950s.

Flournoy E. Miller, African-American actor, comedian, playwright, lyricist, and producer, was born in Columbia, Tennessee on April 14, 1887. While attending Fisk University in Nashville, he started his entertainment career, joining with his childhood friend, Aubrey Lyles, to form a 25-year partnership in 1903. They performed in college theatricals, and in 1907, Miller and Lyles were offered their first professional positions as playwrights for the Pekin Theater Stock Company in Chicago, Illinois. While there, they co-wrote their first play, "The Mayor of Dixie." In 1907, they also wrote "The Oyster Man" for Ernest Hogan, who starred in the musical until his death in 1909. In 1915, they starred in "Darkydom," which entered them into stardom and was the first major black musical comedy.

Their biggest success came in 1921, when they joined with Eubie Blake and Noble Sissle to write and produce "Shuffle Along." After the closing of "Shuffle Along" in 1924, they produced a variety of musical comedies, including "Runnin' Wild" (1924) and "Rang Tang" (1927). After the successful run of their production "Keep Shufflin'" (1928), Miller and Lyles broke up. Miller went on to write and appear in Lew Leslie's "Blackbirds" in 1930. In the following year, the team reunited and produced "Sugar Hill" with James P. Johnson.

After Aubrey Lyles' death in 1932, Miller teamed up with comedian Mantan Moreland, and they toured the vaudeville circuits. They appeared together in the motion picture, "Harlem on the Prairie," the first all-Black western. In the 1950s, Miller wrote for the television show, "Amos and Andy."

Flournoy E. Miller died in Hollywood, California on June 6, 1971. He and wife, Bessie Miller, had one daughter, Olivette, who was a renowned jazz harpist in Chicago, Illinois in the 1940s and 1950s.

Scope and Content Note

This collection contains the papers of Flournoy E. Miller and his daughter, Olivette Miller, from 1924-1995. The papers include financial and legal records, draft manuscripts and lyrics, correspondence, printed material relating to productions, sheet music, scrapbooks, photographs and artifacts.

Arrangement Note

Organized into four series: (1) Flournoy E. Miller papers, (2) Olivette Miller papers, (3) Photographs, and (4) Audiovisual.


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Description of Series

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