Series 1
Correspondence, 1927-1953, 1968-1980
Boxes 1-2

Scope and Content Note

The series consists of approximately 100 original Margaret Mitchell letters, and a few letters to or about Margaret Mitchell from 1927-1953, 1968-1980. Also contains approximately 10 photocopies of Mitchell letters, some of the originals are in other manuscript collections at Emory.

Primary recipients of correspondence are Harvey Smith, Julian Harris, Nelson Shipp, and Cary Wilmer. The majority of Mitchell/Harvey Smith letters are each accompanied by a typed explanation by Harvey Smith.

Arrangement Note

Arranged in chronological order.

Scope and Content Note The series consists of approximately 100 original Margaret Mitchell letters, and a few letters to or about Margaret Mitchell from 1927-1953, 1968-1980. Also contains approximately 10 photocopies of Mitchell letters, some of the originals are in other manuscript collections at Emory. Primary recipients of correspondence are Harvey Smith, Julian Harris, Nelson Shipp, and Cary Wilmer. The majority of Mitchell/Harvey Smith letters are each accompanied by a typed explanation by Harvey Smith.
Box Folder Content
1 1 MM to [Harvey Smith], "umptieth" July 1927, Tuesday, ALS, 10 p. In this letter MM writes about her experience of leaving home for the first time when she went away to college in the NE. Topics include the meaning of love and beauty, how the subconscious works, and how distance (from home) creates perspective. Smith includes a typed commentary in which he contextualizes some of MM's ideas.
1 2 MM to [Harvey Smith], 23 or 24 July 1927, Friday, ALS, 3 p. with envelope envelope. MM briefly describes a trip to New York from which she has just returned. She also mentions people she is going to visit. She teases Smith about the "dirty book shops" in New York, and mentions that she has ordered Havelock Ellis's book Man and Woman. Smith includes a typed commentary in which he explains who the people mentioned by MM are.
1 3 MM to [Harvey Smith], 3 August 1927, ALS, 2 p. envelope. MM briefly describes a trip to New York from which she has just returned. She also mentions people she is going to visit. She teases Smith about the "dirty book shops" in New York, and mentions that she has ordered Havelock Ellis's book Man and Woman. Smith includes a typed commentary in which he explains who the people mentioned by MM are.
1 4 MM to [Harvey Smith], Monday [ca. 1927-1929], TLS, 4 p. This letter is full of news about life and people in Atlanta, some of it gossip. Smith provides a typed commentary on the people mentioned which is both amusing and helpful. MM also mentions her recent "maniac mood," how she is finding it hard to write, and what she has been reading, including "My Life on a Georgia Slave Plantation" by Fanny Kemball, and two books purchased by "Mrs. Porter" for their pornographic content, which MM comments on.
1 5 MM to Harvey [Smith], [1928-1931?], ANS, 2 p. Two invitations for dinner. Smith includes a brief written note contextualizing them.
1 6 MM to [Harvey Smith], [ca. 1929], ALS, 1 p., with envelope. A brief note mentioning the book MM has just finished reading ("Letters of Madame"). Of most interest is the commentary by Smith on the literature that he and MM shared a mutual interest in. He also makes brief comments on MM's preferred poets (Swinburne and Bighorn), as well as her reading and book buying habits.
1 7 Check from Rosebowl Tea Room, Atlanta, with drawing on back, with manuscript annotations by HS and MM [1929-1931?]. The commentary by HS provides the details on the building sketched and MM's interest in it, namely her fascination with the ante bellum South.
1 8 Julia [Memminger] to Peggy and John [Marsh], 30 June 1931, New York City, ANS, 2 p. with envelope. This is a card written by Memminger informing MM and John Marsh (MM's husband), of her impending marriage to Bill Reilly, in New York.
1 9 MM to [Harvey Smith], 3 July 1931, TLS, 1 p. A short letter about Memminger's news of her impending marriage, and MM's own upcoming sixth wedding anniversary. Smith provides an explanatory note about the peopled mentioned, and a brief biography of Julia Memminger.
1 10 MM to Harvey Smith, 25 December 1931, telegram, 1 p. Sent to Smith whilst he was at the Piedmont Sanitarium.
1 11 MM to [Harvey Smith], 21 June 1932, ALS, 2 p. A short letter detailing a surprise visit by Julia Memminger. Smith includes typed commentary.
1 12 MM to [Harvey Smith], 1 July 1932, TLS, 2 p. A letter describing MM's discontented state of mind, the books she has read, and news of a mutual acquaintance (Dr. Moorhead). Smith provides commentary on Dr. Moorhead, as well as explanations of the other people mentioned in the letter.
1 13 MM to [Harvey Smith], 14 July 1932, TLS, 4 p. A letter in which MM ponders her relationship with "the land," and what part that relationship plays in the "great American Novel" she is writing (i.e., Gone With the Wind). The last half of the letter is concerned with news of mutual friends and acquaintances. Smith provides a typed commentary.
1 14 MM to [Harvey Smith], 19 February 1933, 4 p. In this letter, MM comments on the recent assassination attempt on President Roosevelt, particularly the press coverage (the clippings she mentions are not included). The rest of the letter is concerned with the Memminger family, (an Atlanta family both MM and Harvey Smith were familiar with from childhood), in particular the exploits of Julia Memminger's younger sister. Smith provides a commentary on the names mentioned.
1 15 MM to [Harvey Smith], 1 March 1933, ALS, 1 p. This is a short hand written letter in which MM comments on a number of clippings she was sending with the letter (not included). She briefly mentions the depression, as well as an unmarked cemetery from the civil war near Jonesboro Ga. where her family owned a farm. Smith includes a brief commentary on the names mentioned and on the context of her reference to "footnotes."
1 16 MM to [Harvey Smith], 8 March 1933, TLS, 4 p. In this letter MM writes in some detail about the depression, particularly the closing of the banks, the general atmosphere as people waited to see what action the newly inaugurated President Roosevelt would take, and how it affected her and her family. Smith provides a brief commentary on the names mentioned.
1 17 MM to [Harvey Smith], 15 March 1933, TLS, 17 p. In this letter, MM writes about her family, particularly her Mother and Aunt (her Mother's younger sister), and her fractious relationship with the latter. In his commentary Smith draws out the parallels between members of MM's family, and certain characters in Gone With the Wind. MM also writes about her apartment, mutual friends (of which Smith provides full names in his typed commentary), and a vivid description of a "colored wedding" she had attended.
1 18 MM to [Harvey Smith], 16 April 1933, 8 p., with handwritten postscript. In this letter, MM writes about a recent hold up in a tobacco store in which her brother, Stephens Mitchell, was an unwilling participant. She also describes two trips she had recently taken, one to South Carolina, and the other to the old family farm in Clayton Co. Georgia. The rest of the letter is concerned with news about Peggy Porter and comments on Smith's trip to Italy. The handwritten postscript is mainly concerned with two friends who had recently become grandparents. Smith provides a brief commentary on some of the people mentioned.
1 19 MM to Harvey [Smith], 21 April 1933, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 4 p. This letter is devoted to MM's thoughts concerning the "Great Depression." She writes in some detail about Roosevelt's policies in attempting to restore trust in the banking system. She gives her opinions freely on whether he will be successful or not, and on peoples attitudes in general, to the crisis. She also goes into some detail about the state of her and her husband's financial situation. Smith provides an illuminating commentary on MM and her attitude to money.
1 20 MM to [Harvey Smith], 24 May 1933, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 15 p. This letter covers a number of topics. The "damned book" is mentioned briefly, particularly in terms of her story telling method. She ponders the differences between Europe and the United States, as well as the particular eccentricities of character exhibited by "the south." She also includes a humorous story about herself, and a detailed account of her friend - Peggy Porter - whose love life had reached a moment of crisis. Smith includes a commentary that ponders MM's character, particularly her listening and story telling talents, and what that meant in terms of her friendships.
1 21 MM to Harvey [Smith], 29 June 1933, ALS, 8 p. This is a handwritten letter in which MM writes that the reason people travel was to find out who they were, rather than to understand the places or people they were visiting. In his commentary, Smith agrees with MM's opinion of herself, which was that on her travels she found out that she was a "chaste" and "good" woman, despite her occasional hankering for physical and moral adventure.
1 22 MM to [Harvey Smith], 13 July 1933, ALS, 4 p. In this short letter, MM is mainly preoccupied with providing Smith with contacts in New York in order to help him with his planned move to that city. Smith provides a list of the names mentioned and the nature of their affiliation with MM.
1 23 MM to [Harvey Smith], 29 December [1933?], TLS, missing 2 of 8 pages (Smith has this dated March or April 1933, but the last page of the letter has the date listed as December 29th). This is an incomplete letter (the first two pages are missing), which covers three or four different subjects. The first part of the letter is a description of a drunken party held by MM. The second is a short rumination on the deteriorating health of her friend, Peggy Porter. The third part is a humorous description of the decor of her apartment. And the last part of the letter is concerned with a misunderstanding she and Smith must have had. Smith provides an illuminating commentary on the context of MM's life in Atlanta, who her friends were, and some of the idiosyncrasies of her character.
1 24 M.E.B. [Margaret E. Baugh] to Norman, 27 December 1935, TLS, 2 p.
1 25 Carl J. Strang to All Office Employees, "Miss Baugh," 3 January 1936, 1 p., torn
1 26 MM to Julian Harris, 21 April 1936, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 3 p. (photostat). In this letter MM writes of the reasons why she wrote Gone With the Wind and the context of it's production. She declares that she "doesn't think much of it," but that it is historically accurate.
1 27 MM to Julia Collier Harris, 28 April 1936, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 4 p. (photostat). This letter is essentially a short and humorous autobiography. It explains why MM was so interested in the Civil War period, what her family was like, and what she liked to read.
1 28 MM to Harvey [Smith], 12 May 1936, ANS, 1 p. Short note thanking Smith for the clippings he had sent her, of which Smith provides a typed explanation. In his commentary, Smith also mentions "Susan Myrick," the dialect coach for the filmed version of Gone With the Wind, and her connection to MM.
1 29 MM to Julia Collier Harris, 19 May 1936, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 4 p. (photostat). In this letter, MM thanks Mrs. Harris for her favorable review of Gone With the Wind.
1 30 MM to Mildred Seydell, 20 June 1936, TLS, 2 p., with typescript of letter, and photocopy of envelope; plus photocopy of carbon copy typescript from Mildred Seydell papers. Thanks Seydel for her review of Gone With the Wind. In particular, MM notes her appreciation of Seydel's perception that the real theme of the book was "faith in goodness." MM goes on to note that Melanie was the true heroine of the book. In the rest of the letter, MM comments on the common background she and Seydel shared, particularly the commonality of the stories about the "Old South" and the Civil War, that they were told as children.
1 31 MM to Julia Collier Harris, 29 June 1936, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 3 p. (photostat). This letter is a humorous account of MM's experience of sudden fame after the publication of Gone With the Wind, in particular the ambivalent even contradictory way it made her feel.
1 32 MM to [Harvey Smith], 1 July 1936, Atlanta, Georgia, ALS, 2 p., with envelope. A short letter in which MM thanks Smith for the flowers he had sent her. Expresses weariness and regret at the demands placed on her since the publication of Gone With the Wind. Typed commentary by Smith places this letter at a pivotal moment in MM's life. The sudden fame experienced by MM, results, according to Smith, in mostly negative changes in MM's character, and that this letter was one of the last expressions of her old character.
1 33 MM to Julia Collier Harris, 8 July 1936, Gainesville, Georgia, TLS, 2 p. (photostat). In this letter, MM mentions her "escape" to the mountains to get away from incessant phone calls and predatory journalists. She also responds to criticisms made about the historical accuracy and prose style of the book.
1 34 MM to Thomas English, 11 July 1936, TLS, 1 p. with envelope. This letter is a reply to English's request that MM donate her manuscript of Gone With the Wind to Emory University. MM refuses, gracefully, on the grounds that she cannot "give up the first baby."
1 35 MM to [George] Ward, 1 September 1936, 1 p. (photocopy). A letter thanking Mr. Ward for sending his Mother's memoir to MM. She comments favorably on the contents, and on the personality of the writer, and hopes that Mr. Ward will agree to two extra copies being made, one for the Carnegie Library and one for MM.
1 36 SLD to Mollie, 9 October 1936, TL, fragment.
1 37 MM to Thomas English, 23 October 1936, TLS, 1 p. In this letter MM declines English's invitation to be interviewed by "the boys" at Emory University. She offers a series of reasons why she can not spare the time, mostly due to the incessant demands made on her by people interested in her fame and (potential) influence.
1 38 MM to [unidentified], 9 November 1936, TLS, 1 p., fragment; from Cary Wilmer collection. A note explaining the title, Gone With the Wind, came from a poem by Ernest Dowson.
1 39 [MM] to Sr. Miriam, Mrs. Alfred L. Lustig, 19 January 1937, TL, 1 p.
1 40 John R. Marsh to Emily Woodward, 19 January 1937, TLS, 1 p. with attachment. With copy of newspaper. A short letter in which Marsh introduces a copy of the Two Bells newspaper, produced by Georgia Power Co. and on which Marsh worked.
1 41 MM to Irma Fata, 26 January 1937, TLS, 1 p.
1 42 MM to Mr. Long, 1 February 1937, TLS, 2 p.
1 43 [MM] to Rabbi Mord. M. Thurman; [MM] to Mrs. Prisc. Goodwyn Griffin, 6 February 1937, TL, 1 p.
1 44 [MM] to Doctor Cross, 8 February 1937, TL, 1 p., fragment
1 45 MM to Mr. Dick, 16 February 1937, TL, 2 p.
1 46 MM to Emily [Woodward], 3 March 1937, ANS, 2 p. (photocopy);original mounted on last leaf of Gone With the Wind, PS3525.I74G6 1936b
1 47 MM to Mildred Seydell, 16 March 1937, TLS, 1 p. (photocopy); original in Mildred Seydell papers. An acceptance of the invitation to attend Seydel's birthday party at the Press Club.
1 48 MM to Mr. Vause, 25 March 1937, TLS, 2 p.
1 49 John R. Marsh to Julian Harris, 1 April 1937, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 1 page (photostat). This is a short letter of thanks for a recent letter sent by Julian Harris, and an invitation for Mr. and Mrs. Harris to call on the Marshes (MM and John Marsh). There is a brief mention of the siege like state MM was under from journalists, etc.
1 50 MM to Mrs. Elsie Adams Seeger, 1 April 1937; to Mr. Garland A. Kirvan, 15 March 1937; to Mrs. R.B. Tunstall, 2 January 1937; to Mrs. L.B. Curtiss, 14 April 1937, TLS, 1 p.
1 51 MM to Miss Morris, 13 April 1937, TLS, 1 p.
1 52 MM to Captain Abdullah, 14 April 1937, TLS, 1 p.
1 53 Hobe Erwin to MM, 16 April 1937; MM to Hobe Erwin, 10 April 1937, TL, 2 p.
1 54 MM to [unidentified], 21 April 1937, TL, 1 p.
1 55 MM to Julian Harris, 5 May 1937, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 2 p. (photostat). In this letter MM thanks Harris for his "influence" in getting her the Pulitzer Prize. There is a humorous account of her apparent unpreparedness for the event, and a short postscript in which she asks Harris who she should address a letter of thanks to.
1 56 MM to Julian Harris, 11 May 1937, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 1 p., (photostat). A letter in which MM expresses her thanks for Harris's prompt reply to her last letter (see above). There is a further protest of her innocence in such matters as literature prizes. She also offers another aside on the perils of fame, noting that she had been mistaken for another southern woman writer (Caroline Miller).
1 57 [Mrs. Lamar Rutherford Lipscomb?] to MM, 14 May 1937, TL, 1 p. A letter in which Mrs. Lipscomb offers to donate the proceeds from the "immanent" sale of her land, to the Streptomycin fund, in the hopes of helping "poor suffering humanity"; John R. Marsh to Mrs. Lamar Rutherford Lipscomb, 17 January 1940, TLS, 2 p. A short letter of thanks for the offer made by Lipscomb for the funding of the Streptomycin fund. Hopes that Mrs. Lipscomb feels as she does, about the potential, historical magnitude of their participation in the Streptomycin fund; MM to Mrs. Lamar Rutherford Lipscomb, 15 May 1947, TLS, 1 p. (these three letters are glued together). Writing on behalf of MM, Marsh thanks Lipscomb for her suggestion that a MM museum be built. He states that although MM appreciates the thought, she would prefer that the Museum remain just an idea. Also thanks Lipscomb for her concern about the fire in their apartment building; there was no damage to them or any of the mementos owned by MM as they were stored elsewhere.
1 58 MM to [Miss Christie], 15 May 1937, 1 p. (photocopy). MM mentions a "pamphlet" that she hoped had been of use of Miss Christie in her research. Commiserates with her on the "maddening difficulties" of research. (Christie was researching the Arp family).
1 59 Mr. George Ward to [Miss Christie], 18 May 1937, 1 p. (photocopy). A letter notifying Miss Christie that he is sending a copy of his Mother's Memoir, "War Memories," to her. Also states his lack of any information regarding Christie's request for letters between his Mother and Mayor Smith. Mentions John Temple Graves, II as a possible source on the Arp family.
1 60 Mr. George Ward to [Miss Christie], 24 May 1937, 1 p. (photocopy). A short note asking Christie if she had received a copy of "War Memories."
1 61 [MM] to Mr. F.C. Leet, 26 May 1937; Bernard Shapiro to [MM], 13 July 1937; TL, 2 p.
1 62 MM to [Miss Christie], 9 June 1937, 1 p. A letter in which MM relates a conversation she had with Susan Myrick, and through which Myrick provided another possible source on the Arp family.
1 63 MM to [Harvey Smith], 11 June 1937, TLS, 1 p. A short letter in which MM requests that Smith call her when he gets to Atlanta. She invites him to a supper with Lois and Allen Taylor. Smith provides a detailed commentary on Lois and Allen Taylor's connection to MM and Gone With the Wind. He also comments upon the process of getting Gone With the Wind made into a film, and the "passing of the Peggy we liked so much." Gone With the Wind made into a film, and the "passing of the Peggy we liked so much."
1 64 MM to Julian Harris, 28 July 1937, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 1 p. with handwritten postscript. In this letter MM describes her attempts, with the help of lawyers, to prevent opportunists from cashing in on her and Gone With the Wind.
1 65 M. Saunders to [MM], 3 September 1937, TL, 1 p.
1 66 MM to Hobe Erwin, 17 September 1937, TL, 2 p.
1 67 Sidney Howard to MM, 1 October 1937; MM to Sidney Howard, 8 October 1937; MM to Sidney Howard, 11 October 1937, TL, 5 p.
1 68 [MM] to Gilbert Govan, 15 October 1937, TL, 1 p.
1 69 MM to Selznick Inc., 6 December 1937, TL, 1 p.
1 70 MM to Judge L.H. McMahon, 15 December 1937, TLS, 1 p.
1 71 MM to Miss Deighton, 21 December 1937, TLS, 3 p.
1 72 MM to Ralph McGill, 29 December 1937, TLS, 1 p. with envelope. A letter thanking McGill for his news on the Danish reception of Gone With the Wind. Also comments favorably on her Danish publisher, Mr. Steen Hasselbalch, and hopes that McGill managed to meet him whilst in Denmark. Last comment is on the pneumonia epidemic in Atlanta.
1 73 MM to [Margaret] Jemison, 10 March 1938, TLS, 1 p. A letter chiefly concerned with foreign editions of Gone With the Wind. Describes the lawsuit she is bringing against a Dutch publisher who was issuing pirated copies of the book. Thanks Jemison for collection of (legal) foreign editions for Emory University. Mentions her appearance at the Atlanta Library Club. Includes list of contracts closed for translation and publication of Gone With the Wind into foreign languages. Gone With the Wind into foreign languages.
1 74 MM to Nelson Shipp, 15 June 1938, TLS, 2 p. (photocopy) (Shipp was editor of the Ledger Enquirer in Columbus, Ga. when this letter was written). MM writes of a visit by George Cukor, the proposed Director for the movie version of Gone With the Wind. Comments on Cukor's ear for accents, and assures Shipp that the film will portray Southerners as "they really are." Gone With the Wind. Comments on Cukor's ear for accents, and assures Shipp that the film will portray Southerners as "they really are."
1 75 MM to Nelson Shipp, 11 July 1938, TLS, 4 p. (photocopy). MM declines Shipp's proposal that a memorial be built for her on two grounds: his desire to build an old Southern Mansion and call it "Tara," would be misleading, because the "Tara" in Gone With the Wind was in fact a new and "not very beautiful" house, and was made as such for specific reasons; secondly, she does not want to be memorialized as she is neither "great" nor "dead."
1 76 MM to Nelson Shipp, 20 July 1938, TLS, 2 p. (photocopy). Thanks Shipp for his understanding (regarding the memorial), and devotes the rest of the letter to a discussion of the movie version of Gone With the Wind: who will play Scarlet and Rhett? Will Scarlet be "sweetened up"? And how amusing it is to see Hollywood reel under the pressure of Southerners demanding to be portrayed "correctly."
1 77 MM to Bertha [Rogers?], 27 July 1938, ANS, 1 p. An invitation to a party for Susan Myrick and the Macon Telegraph.
1 78 MM to Evelyn Hanna, 6 September 1938, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 1 p., with envelope. A letter in which MM states how much she enjoyed reading Evelyn's book, "Blackberry Winter."
1 79 MM to Evelyn Hanna, 8 September 1938, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 4 p., with envelope. Primarily a letter of advice, MM writes about the pitfalls of writing a successful book, and the lack of privacy even in terms of private letters which can be published by their recipients without the knowledge of their sender, (MM. relates this as a personal experience). She also warns Evelyn of the dangers of taking reviews too seriously. Justifies her proffering of "unsolicited advice" on the basis of encouraging and helping young talented Southerners to write honest, Southern, literature.
1 80 MM to Evelyn Hanna, 3 October 1938, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 3 p. In this letter MM expresses her interest in the confederate exiles who emigrated to Brazil, and encourages Evelyn to write a book on the subject. She provides a number of references for initial research. She also mentions an upcoming Atlanta Women's Press Club meeting, and the European travels of a mutual acquaintance/friend, Marion Saunders. Briefly mentions the war scares in Europe and how that relates to the sales of Gone With the Wind.
1 81 MM to George Clower, 7 November 1938, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 1 p., with envelope (photocopy). A short letter in which MM expresses her admiration for Clower's costume as "Colonel Cuyler," which he had worn to a costume party they had both attended. Thanks him for a clipping he sent to her, jokingly refers to peoples tendency to fill up the "vacant limbs" of their family trees with the ancestors of famous people, and expresses her wish to be related to Clower's relative, Frances Letcher Mitchell.
1 82 MM to Nelson Shipp, 16 February 1939, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 1 p. Thanks him for his editorials. Is perplexed by Shipp's apparent desire for Scarlett to be made a more virtuous character (in the film).
1 83 MM to Nelson Shipp, 2 March 1939, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 1 p. Relates that she was unable to attend the Press Institute meeting due to illness. States that those meetings are the only ones she goes to now, as she can be "Mrs. John Marsh" rather than "Margaret Mitchell, Author." For the same reason, she declines Shipp's invitation to a luncheon for Women's Civic Associations. Laments the way "MM" and Gone With the Wind have completely dominated her life since publication.
1 84 MM to Mildred Seydell, 29 March 1939, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 1 p., (photocopy); original letter in Mildred Seydell papers . Thanks Seydel for the plant she had sent. Apologizes for her delay in replying, which was due to illness. Mentions that there is something she needs to talk to Seydel about at some point.
1 85 MM to Dr. and Mrs. Thomas English, 3 August 1939, ANS, 1 p. Invitation to a party in honor of Mrs. Angus Perkerson.
1 86 MM to Judge [Arthur Gray] Powell, 8 August 1939, TLS, 1. Thanks him for inviting her to address the Ten Club; apologizes for having to rearrange it due to a conflict in her schedule.
1 87 MM to Judge [Arthur Gray] Powell, 22 August 1939, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 1 p. Thanks him for the paper he had written on GWTW, and the "many grand things" he said.
1 88 MM to Thomas [English], 14 November 1939, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 2 p. Declines English's request for a signed photograph of herself and part of the manuscript of Gone With the Wind. Offers a photograph with a superimposed signature on it, as well as some foreign reviews of Gone With the Wind for his (intended) exhibit on the foreign reception of the book. Mentions people inundating her with requests for such material and information as reason why she refuses request. Gone With the Wind for his (intended) exhibit on the foreign reception of the book. Mentions people inundating her with requests for such material and information as reason why she refuses request.
1 89 MM to Frank Daniel, 16 December 1939, Atlanta, Georgia, ALS, 1 p., with envelope (photocopy); original at Upson County Historical Society, Thomaston, Georgia. Thanks him for his "premiere story" on the opening night of the movie version of GWTW. Refers to him having perjured himself in the process.
1 90 MEB [Margaret E. Baugh] to Patricia [Fraser], March 1941, TLS, 1 p. with attached note from John Marsh, ANS, 1 p.
1 91 Anderson H. Scruggs to MM, 17 March 1941, Atlanta, Georgia, TL, 1 p. (carbon). Thanks MM (along with Helen Parker and Minnie Hite Moody), for their part in recommending his second book of poetry to a publisher. Notifies her of a third collection in manuscript form. Expresses his hope that publication will be a more favorable process now that MM has wielded her influence with publishers (specifically Macmillan, which was also MM's publisher).
1 92 MM to Anderson [Scruggs], 19 March 1941, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 1 p. Expresses her happiness that her "influence" helped get his book published. Writes of her admiration for his work, and jokes about the etiquette involved in recommending other writers to your publisher.
1 93 MM to [Margaret] Jemison, 2 August 1941, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 1 p. A short note stating that seen as she had not heard from Jemison, the photograph she had sent to her must not have arrived, and is sending another one in it's stead. Requests that Jemison notify her if the original turns up. Mentions at the end, that she enjoyed her visit to Jemison's library.
1 94 MM to Anderson H. Scruggs, 28 November 1941, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 1 p., with envelope and enclosed clipping. A short note referring to the clipping included, which is a review by Father J. M. Lelen, of Scrugg's book of poetry, Ritual for Myself.
1 95 MM to Julia Collier Harris, 28 July 1942, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 2 p., with envelope A short note referring to the clipping included, which is a review by Father J. M. Lelen, of Scrugg's book of poetry, Ritual for Myself.
1 96 MM to Cary Wilmer, 4 January 1943, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 2 p., with envelope. Congratulates Wilmer on finally getting into the army after having to "sit around" and wait. Notes how she misses his presence in Atlanta, especially when she goes for her 4.00 O'clock lunches at the Driving Club. Mentions "Julius" and "Sam Tupper" who sent their best wishes to him. Writes humorously about her advancing age, and seeing the daughters and grandsons of people half her age at the Debutante Club. Relates her story of the first wedding she attended, at which she got "loose in a bowl of champagne punch" and was "distressingly ill behind a rosewood sofa."
1 97 MM to Cary Wilmer, 26 January 1943, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 2 p., with envelope and enclosed clipping. A light hearted letter. Jokes about the army's decision to accept Wilmer into the 'glider corps' despite his 'advancing age'. Writes about how the war has affected Atlanta society, particularly the Driving Club. Mentions the Club's "colored staff" being marooned without customers. Also describes her own war efforts: mending uniforms and helping to raise funds for the (sunk) battleship "Atlanta." Lastly she mentions the novelist Harvey Allen in favorable terms.
1 98 MM to Cary Wilmer, 17 March 1943, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 2 p., with envelope. Jokes about Wilmer's army "casual" status. Mentions that she will ask Ralph McGill for news of him [Wilmer]. Also mentions Clifford Tritchler and Sam Tupper, one who was on leave from the army, and the other dismissed for being too old. Hopes that he gets posted to Montgomery. And lastly, she notes the success of the U.S.S. Atlanta campaign; briefly describes the banquet in honor of the fundraising.
1 99 Margaret Baugh (Secy. to Mrs. Marsh) to Cary Wilmer, 6 April 1943, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 1 p., with envelope; from Cary Wilmer collection. This is a letter from MM's secretary, who was asked to write to Wilmer on behalf of MM whilst she was in John Hopkins Hospital. Sends MM's thanks for his [Wilmer's] last letter. Writes briefly on MM's progress in hospital, and her plans for recovery. (MM had had an operation on her back).
1 100 MM to Cary Wilmer, 11 May 1943, TLS, 3 p., with envelope. A letter mainly devoted to the recent (re)implementation of prohibition in Georgia. States that whilst she thinks it a good idea to protect the "uniform-crazy" youth from the dangers of alcohol (and in relation to this she mentions the "irresponsibility" of hotels and bars, who served underage drinkers), she also thinks it an amusing idea that the "best thought of" citizens in Atlanta, were drinking in secret and then rushing out onto the street yelling "Hooray for hell, the devil is dead." Writes with a certain fervor for the war effort, and relates that her reason for having the operation on her back, was to be able to do "any job" required of her for the war effort.
1 101 Margaret E. Baugh to Sen. Walter George, 13 May 1943, TLS, 1 p.
1 102 MM to Mildred [Seydell], 21 May 1943, TLS, 1 p., (photocopy, original in Mildred Seydell papers). In reply to Seydel's invitation to a party of the Atlanta federation in honor of Miss Davies, MM sends her regrets, stating her recent operation and subsequent house boundedness as the reason why she will be unable to attend.
1 103 MM to Cary Wilmer, 29 July 1943, TLS, 1 p. This is a short letter concerned with news of various people known by both MM and Wilmer. MM mentions Ralph McGill whose reports from London included one about the fall of Mussolini. She also mentions that Chief Justice Charles Reid had resigned from the supreme court to take up an administrative post in the army. She briefly mentions Dan Elkin, a doctor in the medical corps who was in Atlanta on leave, and Jack Hickey who was working at the Bell bomber plant after leaving the army.
1 104 MM to Cary Wilmer, 23 August 1943, TLS, 2 p. with envelope. In this letter MM offers to help Wilmer if he should decide to leave the army. She mentions that Ralph McGill is home and busily writing to the families of soldiers he had met in London. She also mentions an aberrant story about her, originating with a radio broadcaster (Jimmie Fidler) who reported that she was "under the care of a Chicago specialist," (which gives her the opportunity to lament on the pains and tribulations of fame).
1 105 MM to [Arthur Gray] Powell, 13 September 1943, Atlanta, Georgia, TL, 1 p. (copy of original). Through a third party, MM has learnt that Powell's book is to be published, although not under the original title ("'Lady Godiva and the Horses'"). MM offers up "'Bacon With My Greens'" as a possible alternative. She also requests a copy of the book.
1 106 MM to Cary Wilmer, 7 October 1943, TLS, 2 p. with envelope. MM begins her letter with the murder of Mr. Heinz of Atlanta and the furor it caused in the Atlanta press. The rest of the letter is concerned with news about Atlantans known to both MM and Wilmer. In particular, MM relays the news that Wright Bryan of the Atlanta Journal, was still reporting from London whilst Ralph McGill of the tlanta Constitution had returned home, a cause for renewed tension and competition between the papers according to MM. She also briefly mentions Charles Reid, Sam Tupper (a mutual friend who had been discharged from the army, because of his age), and Claude Harndon. She ends with a story about telling a joke to a friend -- Mary Ballenger Foster -- whilst she was in the hospital, and the physical distress it caused both her and Foster. tlanta Constitution had returned home, a cause for renewed tension and competition between the papers according to MM. She also briefly mentions Charles Reid, Sam Tupper (a mutual friend who had been discharged from the army, because of his age), and Claude Harndon. She ends with a story about telling a joke to a friend -- Mary Ballenger Foster -- whilst she was in the hospital, and the physical distress it caused both her and Foster.
1 107 MM to Cary Wilmer, 10 December 1943, TLS, 1 p. A letter inquiring whether Wilmer will be home for Christmas. Mentions that she has no gossip to tell as she doesn't "circulate much these days."
2 1 Margaret Jemison to MM, 19 February 1944, TL, 1 p. Jemison thanks MM for her contributions to the Emory files on the battleship Atlanta. Asks for any materials MM might have on the launching of the second U.S.S. Atlanta. Commends MM for her "war activities," and mentions that an Emory librarian, Dick Harwell, was in the South Pacific serving as an Ensign with the U.S. Navy.
2 2 MM to Margaret Jemison, 21 February 1944, TLS, 2 p. A reply to Jemison's letter. MM promises to write to the shipbuilding company for a photograph of the U.S.S. Atlanta for the Emory files. Notes that the scarcity of materials due to the war, meant that she received few souvenirs from the launch. In a postscript MM mentions that she has found an extra photograph of the launch which she is sending along, and explains who the people present in the photograph are.
2 3 Margaret Jemison to MM, 26 February 1944, TL, 1 p. In reply to MM's letter, Jemison thanks her for her generosity and promises to send MM's regards to Dick Harwell.
2 4 John [Marsh] to Margaret [Baugh], 19 March 1944, ALS, 1 p.
2 5 MM to Cary Wilmer, 8 May 1944, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 2 p., with envelope. A letter concerned with news of friends and life in Atlanta. Describes meeting "Claud" unexpectedly for lunch, mentions "Adgate and Ewell," and that another friend -- Ann Couper -- took all three out to lunch on John's [Marsh] expense account. Mentions her father's illness as well as her own, and her generally frenetic life. Hopes that Wilmer will get a vacation so that they can have a "gabfest." States that she has great admiration for his determination to be in the army when others are "trying to get out."
2 6 MM to [Harvey Smith], 10 May 1944, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 1 p. A letter of condolence sent to Smith upon hearing of his father's death through a mutual friend, Elinor Hillyer. Smith provides a commentary on this letter, explaining Hillyer's relationship to both himself and MM. Notes that all of MM's old friends "fell off" in the last three years of MM's life. Also mentions MM's posthumous request that all her letters be destroyed. Smith notes that whilst Hillyer and another friend, Lois Taylor complied, they had advised John Marsh not to ask him [Smith] to do the same.
2 7 Thank you card from family of Margaret Mitchell Marsh, 1 July 1944. A thank you for sympathy card, (for the death of MM's father).
2 8 John R. Marsh to Emily Woodward, 6 September 1944, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 1 p. A letter in which Marsh informs Woodward of a "program" he and others of the Georgia Power Company are setting up in Georgia called the "Better Home Towns program." Wants Woodward's comments and ideas. Notes that he and Peggy were "planning" to invite her for dinner.
2 9 MM to Cary Wilmer, 12 September 1944, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 2 p. MM opens up this letter with a short, humorous description of the attractions of Chicago, where Wilmer is located and thinking of settling once the war is over. Notes that the Atlanta Constitution and Atlanta Journal newspapers are staffed mostly by "childish looking young ladies" who nevertheless do "excellent work." Mentions that a neighbor's son had been killed in action in France, and that the wives of two captured soldiers (Colonel Philip Fry and General Ned King), had received prisoner of war letters from their husbands after fearing they were both dead. MM also mentions that she and her brother have not been able to go over her father's estate since his death in June. Lastly, she notes that "[L]ittle Roddy McDowell" and Carmen Miranda were in Atlanta for the premiere of the film "Wilson," a picture made by Lamar Trotti, a "home town boy." Atlanta Journal newspapers are staffed mostly by "childish looking young ladies" who nevertheless do "excellent work." Mentions that a neighbor's son had been killed in action in France, and that the wives of two captured soldiers (Colonel Philip Fry and General Ned King), had received prisoner of war letters from their husbands after fearing they were both dead. MM also mentions that she and her brother have not been able to go over her father's estate since his death in June. Lastly, she notes that "[L]ittle Roddy McDowell" and Carmen Miranda were in Atlanta for the premiere of the film "Wilson," a picture made by Lamar Trotti, a "home town boy."
2 10 John R. Marsh to Emily Woodward, 12 December 1944, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 1 p. A letter thanking Woodward for her participation in the judging committee for the "Better Home Towns Contest."
2 11 MM to Cary Wilmer, 6 June 1945, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 1 p. MM inquires about Wilmer's illness; wonders if he wants "his people" to know, and asks him if he would like any reading material sent to him. She also wonders whether he is due to be discharged from the army now that he is almost forty.
2 12 [Unidentified] to MM, program, 15 June 1945
2 13 MM to Anderson [Scruggs], 4 August 1945, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 1 p. A letter thanking Scruggs for his help in locating a dentist for the child of MM's cook.
2 14 John [Marsh] to MM, 2 November 1945, 1 p.
2 15 [MEB] Margaret E. Baugh to [unidentified] 16 January 1946
2 16 John K. Paisley to MEB [Margaret E. Baugh], 20 January 1946, 1 p.
2 17 MM to Lethea [Mrs. Edwin Lochridge?], 18 June 1946, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 1 p. (photocopy). A letter thanking Lochridge for the mountain laurel and "graceful vase" she had sent to the Marsh's.
2 18 May Lamberton Becker to MEB [Margaret E. Baugh], 10 October 1946
2 19 MM to Julia Collier Harris, 27 January 1947, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 2 p., (photostat). In this letter, MM invites Mrs. Harris to a Women's Press Club party. She also praises the Harris's for their attempts (in their earlier lives) to expose and fight the Ku Klux Klan. This praise is given as pointed criticism of the "blathering" liberals, who, in the national press, were (apparently) claiming victory over the Klan as theirs.
2 20 MM to Bill [Hartsfield], 25 March 1947, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 1 p., (photostat); from William B. Hartsfield papers. MM thanks Hartsfield for the broadside he had sent on the picketing by communists of the film -- "Song of the South." Notes that there wasn't the same coverage of similar picketing against Gone With the Wind. Declares that if she had not had to look after "very ill people" she would engage in a verbal battle with the communists; notes that "[A]ll of us" but "especially southerners" are in a fight with "such people." Urges Hartsfield to send any more information on the subject. Last paragraph is concerned with an update on John Marsh's health (he had had a heart attack on Christmas Eve 1945).
2 21 [MM?] to B.A.B. [?], 1 August 1947, 1 p.
2 22 MM to Julian Harris, 8 October 1947, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 1 p. A short letter thanking Harris for the clippings that he had sent her about Gone With the Wind. She mentions both her husband's, John Marsh, and Mrs. Harris's illnesses, as well as the impending publication of Harris's book.
2 23 MM to Editor, The Atlantian, 9 October 1947, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 2 p., with photocopy of letter. MM thanks the editor for The Atlantian's Christmas good wishes to her in 1945, and 1946. Explains that due to her husband's illness, she was unable to reply until now. Offers $100 as prize money for a writing competition in the hope that it will encourage "the men" to foster any writing talent they may have, and as an expression of gratitude for the publication, of which she has been a subscriber for many years. The Atlantian's Christmas good wishes to her in 1945, and 1946. Explains that due to her husband's illness, she was unable to reply until now. Offers $100 as prize money for a writing competition in the hope that it will encourage "the men" to foster any writing talent they may have, and as an expression of gratitude for the publication, of which she has been a subscriber for many years.
2 24 MM to Editor, The Atlantian, 20 October 1947, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 2 p., with photocopy of letter. Thanks Mr. Tracy (the editor) for his reply to her offer. Compliments him on the title of the contest -- "The Atlantian Christmas Literary Contest" -- and agrees with his reasons for changing the allocation of the prize money. Declines Tracy's invitation to be a judge, stating that her husband's illness and her work (dealing with publishing problems in Europe), mean that she does not have the time. Also states that it "'tain't fitten'" for the benefactor to be a judge. Offers suggestions for the third judge. Looks forward to hearing the results of the competition.
2 25 Deon to Miss Baugh, 22 April 1948, 1 p.
2 26 MM to Margaret [Jemison], 17 January 1949, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 1 p. MM offers Jemison an oilcloth armband from the war for Emory's collection. Gives a history of the use of the armband, stating that she was a Deputy warden (to John Marsh's Warden), for the civilian defense group in Atlanta. Her duties included being the "Emergency Medicine "person who had to set up a First Aid station in an emergency.
2 27 Margaret Jemison to MM, 18 January 1949, TLS, 1 p. (carbon). Thanks MM for her offer, and accepts one of the armbands for the Emory Collection. Also thanks MM for the detailed description of her duties as a Deputy Warden, noting that it "will be of particular interest because it comes above [your] signature."
2 28 [MM?] to Addie Bennett, 1 April 1949, TL, 2 p.
2 29 MM to Mrs. Bradley, 24 May 1949; Atlanta, Georgia, TL, 1 p., together with MM to [MEB], [24-26? May 1949], 2 pages and MEB to [MM], 27 May 1949, TL, 1 p.
Posthumously
2 30 Card admitting bearer to services for MM, 18 August 1949, addressed to Ella Mae Thornton; with note from Thornton to David [Estes] re background of item, and another letter she donated to Emory.
2 31 Mrs. Myron T. Coffman to Eugenia Baugh [MEB], 28 August 1949, Ellamore, West Virginia, TLS, 2 p.
2 32 Thank you card from family of Eugene M. Mitchell to Miss Margaret Jemison, 13 September 1949. A thank-you card for kindness and sympathy. Smith gives a short explanatory note, which states that he heard of MM's death through a newspaper in New York the day before the funeral. Mentions that he had sent flowers, and that he had heard later that it had been requested that no flowers be sent, but that the money should be donated to a charity, which Smith writes, was generally believed to be "a colossal bit of nerve."
2 33 Family of MM to Harvey Smith, 15 September 1949, printed card, 1 p., with envelope
2 34 [Margaret E. Baugh] to Mrs. Myron T. Coffman, 19 September 1949, Atlanta, Georgia, TL, 1 p.
2 35 Mrs. Myron T. Coffman to Margaret E. Baugh, 25 September 1949, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 1 p.
2 36 Amanda Salom to M. [Margaret] Eugenia Baugh, [1951]
2 37 John R. Marsh to Frances [Powell?], 7 August 1951, Atlanta, Georgia, TLS, 1 p. A letter of sympathy for the death of Frances's father, "the Judge." Mentions that "the Judge" and "Peggy" liked each other because they could make people laugh, and always had a joke at the ready.
2 38 [MEB] to Frances [M. Lane], 16 December 1951, TL, 1 p.
2 39 Mildred Kennerly to Margaret [E. Baugh], 26 December 1951, 2 p.
2 40 Katharine [unidentified] to Margaret [E. Baugh], 30 December 1951, 2 p.
2 41 Frances M. Lane to Margaret [E. Baugh], 10 January 1952, TLS, 1 p.
2 42 JRM [John R. Marsh] to ECD, 12 February 1952, TLS, 2 p.
2 43 [Margaret E. Baugh] to Frances [M. Lane], 15 February 1952, TL, 1 p.
2 44 [Margaret E. Baugh] to Katharine [unidentified], 15 February [1952], TL, 2 p.
2 45 Harvey [Smith] to Tom [English], 23 November 1952, TLS, 2 p. This letter was sent to English along with the letters by MM to Smith, which Smith was donating to Emory University. Apologizes for the "spotty" collection explaining the reasons why letters had gone missing. Hopes that the letters reveal the "vivid and charming" person MM was before she became famous. Mentions that he has said all he can to Elinor Hillyer and Lois Cole Taylor about donating their letters from MM to Emory. Suggests English write to them requesting accurately typed copies.
2 46 Harvey [Smith] to Tom [English], 4 December 1952, ALS, 2 p. A short note listing extra items Smith is sending, including photographs and letters.
2 47 MEB [Margaret E. Baugh] to Katharine [unidentified], 20 March 1953, TL, 1 p.
2 48 Hansell Baugh to Frank Daniel, 20 December 1968. A Christmas card [with envelope] in which Baugh sends his good wishes for the new year. The loose paper included with the card lists MM's inscriptions on Margaret Baugh's copies of Gone With the Wind.
2 49 Alicia Rhett to Bill Baxter, 1978-1980, 10 letters. A correspondence mainly concerned with a portrait that Rhett was either painting or having commissioned, and which Baxter was to receive. Mentions visits, telephone conversations and articles.
Undated correspondence
2 50 Change of address notification, no date [MM's new address]. Notice of a change of address, listing MM and John Marsh's move from Seventeenth St. to Piedmont Ave. in Atlanta.
2 51 MM to [unidentified], no date
2 52 Bessie to Miss Margaret [Margaret E. Baugh], no date, 1 p.
2 53 Norman Berg to [MM], no date, TL, fragment
2 54 Olin Miller to MM, no date; MM to Olin Miller no date, TL, 1 p.
2 55 Fragments of unidentified notes, editorial comments, no date
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