MURFREE, MARY NOAILLES, 1850-1922.
Mary Noailles Murfree papers, 1877-1928

Emory University

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/8zpnw


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Murfree, Mary Noailles, 1850-1922.
Title: Mary Noailles Murfree papers, 1877-1928
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 90
Extent: 1.25 linear ft. (3 boxes)
Abstract:Papers of Mary Noailles Murfree, Southerm regional writer, include correspondence, manuscripts, clippings, and photographs.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Unrestricted access.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Source

Gift, 1931-1934.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], Mary Noailles Murfree papers, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Processed by TBB, July 1970.


Collection Description

Biographical Note

Mary Noailles Murfree (January 24, 1850- July 31, 1922), Southern regional writer, was born in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, the daughter of William Law Murfree, a lawyer and his wife Priscilla (Dickinson) Murfree. Mary's ancestry can be traced to the Revolutionary War, she being the great-granddaughter of Lieutenant Colonel Hardy Murfree of the North Carolina military force, after whom Murfreesboro, Tennessee is named. In 1856 the family moved to Nashville, Tennessee, where Mary attended the public schools. She was later sent to a boarding school in Philadelphia where she learned to read and speak French, Italian and Latin. To continue her education she read law under her father. Later she lived in St. Louis, returning to Murfreesboro in 1893. A childhood fever left Mary with partial paralysis and lameness of the feet, although this did not totally incapacitate her until later years. Her sister and constant companion, Fannie Noailles Dickinson Murfree, lived with her and aided her until Mary's death. Mary never married, devoting her life to writing. In her later years, Mary became a recluse, refusing even to grant interviews. Her first story was published under the name R. Emmet Dembry in Lippincott's Magazine for May, 1874. In May, 1878 the Atlantic carried "Dancin' Party at Harrison's Cove" by Charles Egbert Craddock, the pseudonym she used from then on. It was not until 1885 that her publishers learned she was a woman. Mary was at her best in depicting the barren life of the mountaineer. It was she who brought the dialect and life-style of the mountain-folk into popular literature. The latter half of her career she devoted to writing historical novels with great attention to detail. Most of her writing was done for magazines, later to be edited into book form. After a brief illness, Mary died during the night of July 31, 1922. Additional information about Mary can be found in the Dictionary of American Biography, Southern Writers by W. M. Baskerville, (call no. PS261. S55, pp 357-404), Mary N. Murfree by Richard Cary (call no. PS2456. C3), Edd Winfield Parks' Charles–Egbert Craddock (call no. PS2456. P37) and Harry Aubry Toulman's Social Historians (call no. PS261. T6).

Mary Noailles Murfree (January 24, 1850- July 31, 1922), Southern regional writer, was born in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, the daughter of William Law Murfree, a lawyer and his wife Priscilla (Dickinson) Murfree. Mary's ancestry can be traced to the Revolutionary War, she being the great-granddaughter of Lieutenant Colonel Hardy Murfree of the North Carolina military force, after whom Murfreesboro, Tennessee is named. In 1856 the family moved to Nashville, Tennessee, where Mary attended the public schools. She was later sent to a boarding school in Philadelphia where she learned to read and speak French, Italian and Latin. To continue her education she read law under her father. Later she lived in St. Louis, returning to Murfreesboro in 1893. A childhood fever left Mary with partial paralysis and lameness of the feet, although this did not totally incapacitate her until later years. Her sister and constant companion, Fannie Noailles Dickinson Murfree, lived with her and aided her until Mary's death. Mary never married, devoting her life to writing. In her later years, Mary became a recluse, refusing even to grant interviews. Her first story was published under the name R. Emmet Dembry in Lippincott's Magazine for May, 1874. In May, 1878 the Atlantic carried "Dancin' Party at Harrison's Cove" by Charles Egbert Craddock, the pseudonym she used from then on. It was not until 1885 that her publishers learned she was a woman. Mary was at her best in depicting the barren life of the mountaineer. It was she who brought the dialect and life-style of the mountain-folk into popular literature. The latter half of her career she devoted to writing historical novels with great attention to detail. Most of her writing was done for magazines, later to be edited into book form. After a brief illness, Mary died during the night of July 31, 1922. Additional information about Mary can be found in the Dictionary of American Biography, Southern Writers by W. M. Baskerville, (call no. PS261. S55, pp 357-404), Mary N. Murfree by Richard Cary (call no. PS2456. C3), Edd Winfield Parks' Charles–Egbert Craddock (call no. PS2456. P37) and Harry Aubry Toulman's Social Historians (call no. PS261. T6).

Scope and Content Note

The collection consists of the papers of Mary Noailles Murfree from 1877-1929. The papers include correspondence, manuscripts, clippings, and photographs. The correspondence is mainly between Murfree and publishers concerning publication of her stories and books; there is also correspondence with her sister, Fanny Noailles Dickinson Murfree. The manuscripts include Murfree's book-length short story "Alleghany Winds and Waters," ten short stories, and fragments, and three short stories by her father William Law Murfree. Photographs are of the author and of her father.

Arrangement Note

Arranged by record type.


Selected Search Terms

Uniform Title

Personal Names

Corporate Names

Topical Terms

Geographic Names

Form/Genre Terms

Occupation


Container List

Box Folder Content
1 1 Calendar of correspondence
1 2 Correspondence relating to acquisition of manuscripts and papers of Mary Noailles Murfree, 1931 and 1934, list of books in Emory library (May 10, 1934) and copy of article about Mary Noailles Murfree collection which appeared in the Emory Alumnus.
1 3 Mary Noailles Murfree (Charles Egbert Craddock) correspondence. September 5, 1877 - June 6, 1884. Most of these items are from the Atlantic Monthly and Houghton, Mifflin & Co. Many deal with the pubcation of In the Tennessee Mountains. In the Tennessee Mountains.
1 4 June 18, 1884 - October 25, 1884. Most from various publishing houses about stories or the books When the Battle Was or Prophet of the Great Smokey Mountains. Prophet of the Great Smokey Mountains.
1 5 October 27, 1884 - April 20, 1885. From various magazines and publishers about stories. Also about publication of book Down the Ravine.
1 6 August 1, 1885 - August 16, 1886. Most from Houghton, Mifflin & Co.
1 7 September 14, 1886 - April 28, 1888. Most from Houghton, Mifflin & Co.
1 8 June 22, 1892 - May 16, 1893. Includes letters from Miss Murfree to various people.
1 9 June 27, 1893 - December 28, 1893. Letters about His Vanished Star and Phantoms of the Foot Bridge. Includes letters from Miss Murfree to various people. Phantoms of the Foot Bridge. Includes letters from Miss Murfree to various people.
1 10 January 2, 1894 - February 27, 1894. Includes letters from Miss Murfree to various people, most concerning publication of Phantoms of the Foot Bridge.
1 11 March 20, 1894 - December 26, 1894. Most from Houghton, Mifflin & Co. about publication of His Vanished Star and Harper and Brothers about Phantoms of the Foot Bridge. Phantoms of the Foot Bridge.
1 12 February 15, 1895 - August 7, 1895. Includes letters from Miss Murfree to various people. Most from Harper and Brothers or Houghton, Mifflin & Co. about story "The Mystery of Witch-Face Mountain."
1 13 October 19, 1895 - May 4, 1900. Most with various publishers about stories.
1 14 May 7, 1900 - March 17, 1902. Includes letters from various sources about stories and payments.
1 15 March 19, 1902 - November 10, 1928 and undated. Letters about various books and stories and fan mail.
Book-length works
1 16-24 Alleghany Winds and Waters
2 1-13 Alleghany Winds and Waters
Personal papers and unpublished manuscripts
2 14 Photographs - Includes photos of Mary Noailles Murfree and William Law Murfree, Sr.
2 15 Miscellaneous material. Includes advertising circulars for Miss Murfree's books, biographical sketch by Miss Fannie Murfree and D.A.R. record.
2 16 Miscellaneous material. Includes "Nashville Banner" story about Miss Murfree, 2 published stories by Charles Egbert Craddock, and obituary of William L. Murfree, Jr.
2 17 Fragmentary manuscripts. Includes part of manuscript for "Herder on Storm Mountain".
3 1 Unpublished manuscript, 17 pages. "Behind the Cataract" By Charles Egbert Craddock.
3 2 Unpublished manuscript. 41 pages. "Down in the Gorge" by Charles Egbert Craddock.
3 3 Unpublished manuscript. 19 pages. "Binary Stars in Literature" by Charles Egbert Craddock.
3 4 Unpublished manuscript. 15 pages. "Fighting Water" by Charles Egbert Craddock.
3 5 Unpublished manuscript. 66 pages. "The Informer" by Charles Egbert Craddock.
3 6 Unpublished manuscript. 24 pages. "The Lovely Mrs. Quimbridge" (title page missing).
3 7 Unpublished manuscript. 29 pages. "Old Beaux and Young Beaux" by Charles Egbert Craddock.
3 8 Unpublished manuscript. 18 pages. "A Silhouette" by Charles Egbert Craddock.
3 9 Unpublished manuscript. 19 pages. "The Visitants from Yesterday" by Charles Egbert Craddock.
3 10 Unpublished manuscript. 28 pages. "When Old Baldy Spoke"
Unpublished manuscripts by William Law Murfree, Sr.
3 11 Unidentified manuscript. 58 pages (incomplete) (William Law Murfree ?)
3 12 Manuscript. 81 pages. "Adrift on Pensacola Bay" by William Law Murfree, Sr.
3 13 Manuscript. 66 pages. "How the Heir Came into his Own" by William Law Murfree, Sr. Title page mission
v1.11.0-dev