PAULIN, TOM, 1949-
Tom Paulin papers, 1969-2008

Emory University

Robert W. Woodruff Library

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/8zrf8

Collection Stored Off-Site

All or portions of this collection are housed off-site. Materials can still be requested but researchers should expect a delay of up to two business days for retrieval.


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Paulin, Tom, 1949-
Title: Tom Paulin papers, 1969-2008
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 880
Extent: 51 linear ft. (85 boxes) and 8 oversized papers (OP)
Abstract:Personal and literary papers of Irish poet Tom Paulin including correspondence, manuscripts, printed material, photographs, audio-visual materials, subject files, and materials relating to the Field Day Theatre Company.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on access

Special restrictions apply: Subseries 1.4 contains restricted correspondence. Letters of R.F. Foster are closed until 2041 (40 years).

Collection stored off-site. Researchers must contact the Rose Library in advance to access this collection.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

Information on copyright (literary rights) available from repository. All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction. Special restrictions also apply: writings by Ted Hughes may not be reproduced without the written permission of Carol Hughes.

Source

Purchase, 2001.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], Tom Paulin papers, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Gavin Drummond, Project Archivist, Delmas Grant, 2002


Collection Description

Biographical Note

Tom Paulin was born in 1949 in Leeds but raised in Belfast. After attending Hull and Oxford Universities, he embarked on an academic career which began at Nottingham University; since 1994 he has been teaching at Hertford College, Oxford. Paulin has apportioned his literary life into two reasonably distinct areas: he is a poet, and he is a critic.

Paulin's first major volume of poetry, A State of Justice, was published by Faber and Faberin 1977; since then he has published The Strange Museum (1980), Liberty Tree (1983), Fivemiletown (1987), Selected Poems 1972-1990 (1993), Walking a Line (1994) and The Wind Dog (1999). He has received the Eric Gregory Award (1976), the Somerset Maugham Award (1978), and was joint winner of the Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize (1982). In May 2000, he was awarded a three-year fellowship by the National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts (NESTA) in order for him to write a long poem "affirming the struggle and memory of the generation that fought the Second World War." The first part of this project, The Invasion Handbook, was published in 2002.

Tom Paulin's first critical book was Thomas Hardy: The Poetry of Perception (1975). After that monograph he turned to the essay form as his favored method of criticism, publishing critical articles particularly in The London Review of Books (LRB). Many of these essays have been collected together in two volumes: Ireland and the English Crisis (1984) and Minotaur: Poetry and the Nation State (1992). A further selection of his prose, Writing to the Moment: Selected Critical Essays 1980-1996, was published in 1996. More recently his critical work has been focussed on Unitarianism, the late eighteenth century, and particularly on William Hazlitt; in 1998 Faber published his The Day-Star of Liberty: William Hazlitt’s Radical Style.

In some ways, Hazlitt is a model for Tom Paulin's own mode of writing, particularly in Hazlitt's insistence on the blurring of criticism and journalism. Paulin's criticism tends to be in the form of the polemical essay, published initially in a general circulation periodical such as the LRB, and pitched at a reasonably general audience. As well as critical articles, he has written prose diaries for the LRB. But he is perhaps best known in Britain for his combative performances on "Late Review," a BBC2 television program which features intellectual disputation on various artistic productions.

Tom Paulin was born in 1949 in Leeds but raised in Belfast. After attending Hull and Oxford Universities, he embarked on an academic career which began at Nottingham University; since 1994 he has been teaching at Hertford College, Oxford. Paulin has apportioned his literary life into two reasonably distinct areas: he is a poet, and he is a critic.

Paulin's first major volume of poetry, A State of Justice, was published by Faber and Faberin 1977; since then he has published The Strange Museum (1980), Liberty Tree (1983), Fivemiletown (1987), Selected Poems 1972-1990 (1993), Walking a Line (1994) and The Wind Dog (1999). He has received the Eric Gregory Award (1976), the Somerset Maugham Award (1978), and was joint winner of the Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize (1982). In May 2000, he was awarded a three-year fellowship by the National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts (NESTA) in order for him to write a long poem "affirming the struggle and memory of the generation that fought the Second World War." The first part of this project, The Invasion Handbook, was published in 2002.

Tom Paulin's first critical book was Thomas Hardy: The Poetry of Perception (1975). After that monograph he turned to the essay form as his favored method of criticism, publishing critical articles particularly in The London Review of Books (LRB). Many of these essays have been collected together in two volumes: Ireland and the English Crisis (1984) and Minotaur: Poetry and the Nation State (1992). A further selection of his prose, Writing to the Moment: Selected Critical Essays 1980-1996, was published in 1996. More recently his critical work has been focussed on Unitarianism, the late eighteenth century, and particularly on William Hazlitt; in 1998 Faber published his The Day-Star of Liberty: William Hazlitt’s Radical Style.

In some ways, Hazlitt is a model for Tom Paulin's own mode of writing, particularly in Hazlitt's insistence on the blurring of criticism and journalism. Paulin's criticism tends to be in the form of the polemical essay, published initially in a general circulation periodical such as the LRB, and pitched at a reasonably general audience. As well as critical articles, he has written prose diaries for the LRB. But he is perhaps best known in Britain for his combative performances on "Late Review," a BBC2 television program which features intellectual disputation on various artistic productions.

Scope and Content Note

The collection consists of the papers of Irish poet and critic Tom Paulin from 1969-2008. The papers include correspondence; manuscript writings by Paulin including poems, translations, prose and criticism; manuscript writings of others; printed material by and about Paulin; photographs and audiovisual material; personal files and subject files. The collection also contains files relating to Paulin's involvement with the Field Day Theatre Company.

Arrangement Note

Organized into nine series: (1) Correspondence, (2) Works by Tom Paulin, (3) Field Day Theatre Company files, (4) Writings by others, (5) Printed material, (6) Photographs and audiovisual material, (7) Personal files, (8) Subject files, and (9) Unprocessed additions.


Selected Search Terms

Personal Names

Corporate Names

Uniform Titles

Topical Terms


Description of Series

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