PAVIA, PHILIP, 1915-2005.
Philip Pavia and Natalie Edgar archive of abstract expressionist art, 1913-2005

Emory University

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/8zrgd


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Pavia, Philip, 1915-2005.
Title: Philip Pavia and Natalie Edgar archive of abstract expressionist art, 1913-2005
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 981
Extent: 36 linear feet (67 boxes), 5 oversized papers boxes and 5 oversized papers folders (OP), 1 extra oversized papers folder (XOP) and AV Masters: 1 linear foot (1 box)
Abstract:Philip Pavia and Natalie Edgar archive of abstract expressionist art including writings, photographs, legal records, correspondence, and records of It Is, the 8th Street Club, and the 23rd Street Workshop Club.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Unrestricted access.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Source

Purchase, 2004. Additions purchased from Natalie Edgar, 2018.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], Philip Pavia and Natalie Edgar archive of abstract expressionist art, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Processed by Elizabeth Russey and Elizabeth Stice, October 2009. Additions added to the collection in 2018 retain the original order in which they were received.


Collection Description

Biographical Note

Philip Pavia (1912-2005), pioneer in modern abstract sculpture, was born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, the son of a stonecutter. Pavia attended the Beaux Arts School in 1930, the Art Students League (1931-1933), and traveled and studied in Europe from 1931-1937.

In 1948 he founded the 8th Street Club in New York City, an outgrowth of the informal discussions which had been taking place at the Waldorf Cafeteria for years. The Club brought together artists from various media as well as writers and intellectuals for debates, panel discussions, lectures and other events, including dances. Members included Willem de Kooning, Barnett Newman, Robert Motherwell, Landes Lewitin, Aristodimos Kaldis, and Leo Castelli. In the wake of the perceived wartime Surrealist invasion, the Club brought together Abstractionists and Expressionists and helped give birth to the term "Abstract-Expressionism." Debates at the Club covered a variety of art and philosophy-related topics, bringing in non-members like Hannah Arendt, Joseph Campbell, and John Cage, among others. Many members and guests were also associated with the Hans Hofmann School. Pavia was the driving force at the Club, organizing and leading Wednesday and Friday night lectures and members-only panel discussions.

In 1958 he founded and edited the publication It Is: A Magazine for Abstract Art as an extension of the Club's role in exchanging ideas. The magazine was published sporadically until 1965 when it ceased due to financial difficulties. The next year Pavia formed a new club, the 23rd Street Workshop Club, that drew many of its members from the old 8th Street Club, which had since disbanded. With Pavia as organizer, the 23rd Street Club met to hear panels, lectures, and discussions from 1966-1970.

Pavia wrote a history of the 8th and 23rd Street Clubs entitled Club Without Walls which was published two years after his death in 2007. He was married to Natalie Edgar and had two sons, Paul and Luigi.

Philip Pavia (1912-2005), pioneer in modern abstract sculpture, was born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, the son of a stonecutter. Pavia attended the Beaux Arts School in 1930, the Art Students League (1931-1933), and traveled and studied in Europe from 1931-1937.

In 1948 he founded the 8th Street Club in New York City, an outgrowth of the informal discussions which had been taking place at the Waldorf Cafeteria for years. The Club brought together artists from various media as well as writers and intellectuals for debates, panel discussions, lectures and other events, including dances. Members included Willem de Kooning, Barnett Newman, Robert Motherwell, Landes Lewitin, Aristodimos Kaldis, and Leo Castelli. In the wake of the perceived wartime Surrealist invasion, the Club brought together Abstractionists and Expressionists and helped give birth to the term "Abstract-Expressionism." Debates at the Club covered a variety of art and philosophy-related topics, bringing in non-members like Hannah Arendt, Joseph Campbell, and John Cage, among others. Many members and guests were also associated with the Hans Hofmann School. Pavia was the driving force at the Club, organizing and leading Wednesday and Friday night lectures and members-only panel discussions.

In 1958 he founded and edited the publication It Is: A Magazine for Abstract Art as an extension of the Club's role in exchanging ideas. The magazine was published sporadically until 1965 when it ceased due to financial difficulties. The next year Pavia formed a new club, the 23rd Street Workshop Club, that drew many of its members from the old 8th Street Club, which had since disbanded. With Pavia as organizer, the 23rd Street Club met to hear panels, lectures, and discussions from 1966-1970.

Pavia wrote a history of the 8th and 23rd Street Clubs entitled Club Without Walls which was published two years after his death in 2007. He was married to Natalie Edgar and had two sons, Paul and Luigi.

Scope and Content Note

The collection consists of the Philip Pavia and Natalie Edgar archive of abstract expressionist art from 1913-2005. The archive contains records of the 8th Street Club, the 23rd Street Workshop Club, It Is magazine, and writings, personal, and legal papers of Philip Pavia. The collection primarily documents the art, artists, and galleries of the abstract expressionist movement in New York City from 1950-1970.

Arrangement Note

Organized into eight series: (1) 8th Street Club records, (2) It Is Magazine records, (3) 23rd Street Club records, (4) Writings, (5) Printed material, (6) Legal files, (7) Personal papers and (8) Additions.


Selected Search Terms

Personal Names

Topical Terms

Form/Genre Terms


Description of Series

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