PONSOT, MARIE.
Marie Ponsot papers, 1931-2014

Emory University

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/gk1jz

Collection Stored Off-Site

All or portions of this collection are housed off-site. Materials can still be requested but researchers should expect a delay of up to two business days for retrieval.


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Ponsot, Marie.
Title: Marie Ponsot papers, 1931-2014
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 1298
Extent: 18.75 linear feet (38 boxes) and 5 oversized papers (OP)
Abstract:Papers of poet and translator Marie Ponsot, including journals and correspondence, as well as writings and translations by Ponsot.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Collection stored off-site. Researchers must contact the Rose Library in advance to access this collection.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Source

Purchase, 2014.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], Marie Ponsot papers, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Arranged and described at the folder level by Ingrid Meintjes, Anastasiia Strakhova, and Sarah Quigley, 2015.


Collection Description

Biographical Note

Marie Birmingham Ponsot (1921-) was born in New York, New York, to William and Marie (Candee) Birmingham. She attended St. Joseph's College for Women (Brooklyn, New York), graduating in 1940, and earned a master's degree from Columbia University (New York, New York) in 1941. In 1948, she married Claude Ponsot and the couple had seven children. Ponsot has taught in graduate writing programs at Columbia University (New York), Beijing United University (China), New York University, Queens College (New York), and the Poetry Center of New York's 92nd Street Y. In 2010, she was elected a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets.

Ponsot's first book of poetry, True Minds, was published as one of Lawrence Ferlinghetti's Pocket Poets Series from City Lights Press in 1956. She did not publish her second book of poetry, Admit Impediment, until 1981. Her other published volumes of poetry include The Green Dark (1988); The Bird Catcher (1998), which won the National Book Critics Circle Award and was a finalist for the Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize; Springing: New and Selected Poems (2002); and Easy: Poems (2009). Ponsot co-authored two pedagogical works with Rosemary Deen, Beat not the poor desk (1982) and The Common Sense: What to write, how to write it, and why (1985). She has also translated and adapted numerous literary works from French into English, including classic fairy tales and screenplays.

Ponsot has received numerous awards for her work, including a creative writing grant from the National Endowment for the Arts (1979), the Poetry Society of America's Shelley Memorial Award (2002), the Ambassador Book Award for Poetry (2003), the Guggenheim Fellowship for Creative Arts (2003), the Robert Frost Poetry Award (2005), the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize from the Poetry Foundation (2013), and the Aiken Taylor Award for Modern American Poetry (2015), among others.

Marie Birmingham Ponsot (1921-) was born in New York, New York, to William and Marie (Candee) Birmingham. She attended St. Joseph's College for Women (Brooklyn, New York), graduating in 1940, and earned a master's degree from Columbia University (New York, New York) in 1941. In 1948, she married Claude Ponsot and the couple had seven children. Ponsot has taught in graduate writing programs at Columbia University (New York), Beijing United University (China), New York University, Queens College (New York), and the Poetry Center of New York's 92nd Street Y. In 2010, she was elected a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets.

Ponsot's first book of poetry, True Minds, was published as one of Lawrence Ferlinghetti's Pocket Poets Series from City Lights Press in 1956. She did not publish her second book of poetry, Admit Impediment, until 1981. Her other published volumes of poetry include The Green Dark (1988); The Bird Catcher (1998), which won the National Book Critics Circle Award and was a finalist for the Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize; Springing: New and Selected Poems (2002); and Easy: Poems (2009). Ponsot co-authored two pedagogical works with Rosemary Deen, Beat not the poor desk (1982) and The Common Sense: What to write, how to write it, and why (1985). She has also translated and adapted numerous literary works from French into English, including classic fairy tales and screenplays.

Ponsot has received numerous awards for her work, including a creative writing grant from the National Endowment for the Arts (1979), the Poetry Society of America's Shelley Memorial Award (2002), the Ambassador Book Award for Poetry (2003), the Guggenheim Fellowship for Creative Arts (2003), the Robert Frost Poetry Award (2005), the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize from the Poetry Foundation (2013), and the Aiken Taylor Award for Modern American Poetry (2015), among others.

Scope and Content Note

The collection consists of the papers of poet and translator Marie Ponsot from 1931-2014, including writings, personal and professional papers, and subject files. Writings consist of proofs, drafts, and notes of Ponsot's publications; uncollected and unpublished poetry drafts; prose and other writings including translations, essays, and Ponsot's Masters thesis, "An Annotated Edition of the Latin Poems of Edward, Lord Herbert of Cherbury" (1941).

Personal and professional papers include correspondence, a large collection of Ponsot's notebooks, teaching files, materials relating to Ponsot's awards and prizes, and a small amount of photographs and printed material. Subject files contain correspondence, printed material, and writings by other poets and collaborators, as well as material documenting Ponsot's work and community involvement, such as her membership on the PEN American Center Prison Writing Committee. Noteworthy in this series are writings by Joseph Cuomo, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Marilyn Hacker, and Scott Hightower, as well as a poem written for Ponsot by the American performance poet Sapphire. Also included are poems, tributes, introductions, and reviews written for or about Ponsot's work.

Arrangement Note

Organized into three series: (1) Writings, (2) Personal and professional papers, and (3) Subject files.


Selected Search Terms

Personal Names

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Description of Series

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