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PRITCHETT, V. S. (VICTOR SAWDON), 1900-
V.S. Pritchett collection, 1979-1982

Emory University

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/8zshn


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Pritchett, V. S. (Victor Sawdon), 1900-
Title: V.S. Pritchett collection, 1979-1982
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 1012
Extent: .25 linear ft. (1 box)
Abstract:Papers relating to English novelist, essayist, literary critic, and writer of short stories and travel literature, V.S. Pritchett including correspondence and an annotated copy of an interview.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on access

Unrestricted access.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Source

Purchase, 2005.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], V.S. Pritchett collection, Manuscript, Archives and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Processed by Elizabeth Russey, April 7, 2005.


Collection Description

Biographical Note

Victor Sawdon Pritchett, English novelist, essayist, literary critic, and writer of short stories and travel literature, was born December 16, 1900 in Ipswitch, Suffolk. He attended Alleyn's Scool, Dulwich, and Dulwich College in south London intermittantly until his father left to fight in World War I. In 1923 he became a correspondent for the Christian Science Monitor, first in Ireland and then in Spain, writing reviews and other articles for the paper. In 1928, Pritchett published his first book, Marching Spain, which documents his travels across Spain. In addition to numerous short stories, Pritchett published five novels, including Clare Drummer (1929), Nothing Like Leather (1935), and Mr. Beluncle (1951). In 1926 Pritchett began to write for the New Statesman and eventually became a literary editor for the magazine. In 1936 he divorced his first wife, Evelyn, and married Dorothy Rudge Roberts; they had two children.

During World War II, Pritchett worked for the British Broadcasting Corporation and the British Ministry of Information, continuing to write a weekly essay for the New Statesman. After the war, he published biographies of Honore de Balzac, Ivan Turgenev and Anton Chekhov while teaching at a number of universities in the United States. Pritchett was knighted in 1975 for his contributions to literature and in 1993 he became a Companion of Honour. Pritchett's awards include the Heinemann Award (1969), PEN Award (1974), W.H. Smith Award (1990), and Golden Pen Award (1993). Pritchett died in London on March 20, 1997.

Victor Sawdon Pritchett, English novelist, essayist, literary critic, and writer of short stories and travel literature, was born December 16, 1900 in Ipswitch, Suffolk. He attended Alleyn's Scool, Dulwich, and Dulwich College in south London intermittantly until his father left to fight in World War I. In 1923 he became a correspondent for the Christian Science Monitor, first in Ireland and then in Spain, writing reviews and other articles for the paper. In 1928, Pritchett published his first book, Marching Spain, which documents his travels across Spain. In addition to numerous short stories, Pritchett published five novels, including Clare Drummer (1929), Nothing Like Leather (1935), and Mr. Beluncle (1951). In 1926 Pritchett began to write for the New Statesman and eventually became a literary editor for the magazine. In 1936 he divorced his first wife, Evelyn, and married Dorothy Rudge Roberts; they had two children.

During World War II, Pritchett worked for the British Broadcasting Corporation and the British Ministry of Information, continuing to write a weekly essay for the New Statesman. After the war, he published biographies of Honore de Balzac, Ivan Turgenev and Anton Chekhov while teaching at a number of universities in the United States. Pritchett was knighted in 1975 for his contributions to literature and in 1993 he became a Companion of Honour. Pritchett's awards include the Heinemann Award (1969), PEN Award (1974), W.H. Smith Award (1990), and Golden Pen Award (1993). Pritchett died in London on March 20, 1997.

Scope and Content Note

The collection contains material that concerns an interview of V.S. Pritchett conducted in 1979 by Robert W. Smith, a journalist with the Washington Post. The collection includes correspondence between V.S. Pritchett and Robert W. Smith concerning travel arrangements and other practical matters, an annotated copy of the interview transcript, a newspaper clipping of a review of On the Edge of the Cliff, and an unsigned photocopy of an illustration of Pritchett.

Arrangement Note

Arranged by document type.


Selected Search Terms

Personal Names

Topical Terms

Form/Genre Terms

Occupation


Container List

Box Folder Content
1 1 Correspondence, V.S. Pritchett to Robert W. Smith, July 1979-November 1981
1 2 Correspondence, Robert W. Smith to V.S. Pritchett, July 1979-January 1982
1 3 Illustration of V.S. Pritchett
1 4 Interview of V.S. Pritchett conducted by Robert W. Smith, [October 1979]
1 5 Review of On the Edge of the Cliff,New York Review, February 7, 1980 New York Review, February 7, 1980
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