RADOSH, RONALD.
Ronald Radosh papers, circa 1950-2012

Emory University

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/cqxm3


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Radosh, Ronald.
Title: Ronald Radosh papers, circa 1950-2012
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 1242
Extent: 16 linear ft. (16 boxes)
Abstract:Papers of Ronald Radosh, historian, writer, activist, and political commentator, including correspondence, general subject files and subject files relating to the research and publication of his book The Rosenburg File, printed material, and audiovisual materials.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Researchers must contact the Rose Library in advance to access the audiovisual materials in this collection.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Source

Gift, 2012.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], Ronald Radosh papers, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Unprocessed collection.


Collection Description

Biographical Note

Ronald Radosh, historian, writer, activist, and political commentator, was born in 1937, to Reuben Radosh and Ida Kretschman, Jewish immigrants from Russia who had ties to labor union radicalism and Communism in New York City. He grew up immersed in the culture of radical New York even attending Communist-influenced summer camps. While in college, he joined the Communist Party of the United States of America, started publishing radical articles in a variety of publications, and began active participation in the radical New Left.

In the late 1970s, Radosh decided to write a book about the recently released FBI files relating to Julius and Ethel Rosenberg. Radosh began the project sure of the Rosenberg's innocence, but, once he finished the research, he reached the inescapable conclusion (since backed up by USSR records released from the Soviet era) that the Rosenbergs were spies that passed secrets to the Soviets. The resulting book, The Rosenberg File, co-written with Joyce Milton, caused a bitter firestorm, especially among folks on the Left who accused Radosh of being a traitor.

Radosh's move away from the Left to conservatism was cemented in the 1980s, during his visits to Nicaragua to see the Sandinistas. He was disturbed by the Sandinistas' move to totalitarianism and their human rights violations that his colleagues refused to acknowledge or excuse. Now he works for a conservative think tank and publishes articles in The National Review and The Weekly Review.

Ronald Radosh, historian, writer, activist, and political commentator, was born in 1937, to Reuben Radosh and Ida Kretschman, Jewish immigrants from Russia who had ties to labor union radicalism and Communism in New York City. He grew up immersed in the culture of radical New York even attending Communist-influenced summer camps. While in college, he joined the Communist Party of the United States of America, started publishing radical articles in a variety of publications, and began active participation in the radical New Left.

In the late 1970s, Radosh decided to write a book about the recently released FBI files relating to Julius and Ethel Rosenberg. Radosh began the project sure of the Rosenberg's innocence, but, once he finished the research, he reached the inescapable conclusion (since backed up by USSR records released from the Soviet era) that the Rosenbergs were spies that passed secrets to the Soviets. The resulting book, The Rosenberg File, co-written with Joyce Milton, caused a bitter firestorm, especially among folks on the Left who accused Radosh of being a traitor.

Radosh's move away from the Left to conservatism was cemented in the 1980s, during his visits to Nicaragua to see the Sandinistas. He was disturbed by the Sandinistas' move to totalitarianism and their human rights violations that his colleagues refused to acknowledge or excuse. Now he works for a conservative think tank and publishes articles in The National Review and The Weekly Review.

Scope and Content Note

The collection consists of the papers of Ronald Radosh including correspondence, general subject files and subject files relating to the research and publication of his book The Rosenburg File, printed material, and audiovisual materials.

The printed material includes publications relating to the Communist Party, as well as writings by Radosh including articles and letters to the editor. These writings document an unending number of debates - where attacks and counter-attacks were played out in in the pages of journals and magazines. In addition, he writes about playing folk music in the 1950s and 1960s and his relationship with Pete Seeger, Bob Dylan, and Woody Guthrie.

Arrangement Note

Unprocessed collection.


Selected Search Terms

Personal Names

Corporate Names

Topical Terms

Form/Genre Terms


Container List

Box Folder Content
1 Subject files related to The Rosenberg File
2 Subject files and some rare, collected communist publications
3 Subject files related to The Rosenberg File
4 The Rosenberg File research files and other subject files (some related to The Rosenberg File) The Rosenberg File)
5 Rare communist publications and subject files
6 Subject files
7 Subject files (Radosh FBI file in front of box)
8 Rare communist publications and subject files
9 Subject files and reviews of The Rosenberg File
10 Subject files
11 Subject files
12 Subject files
13 Subject files, a few publications in back of box and Rodosh's parents' scrapbook of Radosh's early articles
14 Audiovisual materials: VHS video tapes (25) and cassette audio tapes (22)
15 Periodicals (containing Radosh's articles and letters to the editors and two scrapbooks)
16 Periodicals (containing Radosh's articles and letters to the editors)
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