ROZIER, JOHN.
John Rozier papers, 1967-1987

Emory University

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/8zv0s


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Rozier, John.
Title: John Rozier papers, 1967-1987
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 672
Extent: 2.5 linear ft. (5 boxes)
Abstract:Collection of source material for John Rozier's study of politics in Hancock County, Georgia, including newspaper clippings, correspondence, research notes, and notes from oral interviews of Hancock County residents.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Unrestricted access.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Source

Gift, 1988.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], John Rozier papers, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Processed by Sarah, E. Gardner, March 1993.


Collection Description

Biographical Note

John Rozier was born October 30, 1918 in Sparta, Georgia, to Edward Alexander Rozier, a merchant, and Elleene Burnet Rozier, a piano teacher. He graduated with a BA from Emory University in 1940. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy, achieving the rank of lieutenant senior grade. After the war, he returned to Emory and received his MA in journalism. For the next five years, Rozier served in the U.S. Department of State as a foreign service officer in Seoul, Korea (1947-1949), Chunking, China (1949), and as a vice counsul in Beirut, Lebanon (1949-1952). He left government work in 1952 and became publisher of the Wrightsville Headlight (1956-1958) and the Henrico Herald (1956-1958). In 1958, he edited the feature section of the Atlanta Constitution and from 1959-1979 he was Director of Information Services for Emory University. He left his post at Emory when he received a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to study political and social change in his native Hancock County, Georgia. Rozier died on January 8, 2011 in Atlanta, Georgia.

John Rozier was born October 30, 1918 in Sparta, Georgia, to Edward Alexander Rozier, a merchant, and Elleene Burnet Rozier, a piano teacher. He graduated with a BA from Emory University in 1940. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy, achieving the rank of lieutenant senior grade. After the war, he returned to Emory and received his MA in journalism. For the next five years, Rozier served in the U.S. Department of State as a foreign service officer in Seoul, Korea (1947-1949), Chunking, China (1949), and as a vice counsul in Beirut, Lebanon (1949-1952). He left government work in 1952 and became publisher of the Wrightsville Headlight (1956-1958) and the Henrico Herald (1956-1958). In 1958, he edited the feature section of the Atlanta Constitution and from 1959-1979 he was Director of Information Services for Emory University. He left his post at Emory when he received a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to study political and social change in his native Hancock County, Georgia. Rozier died on January 8, 2011 in Atlanta, Georgia.

Publication Note

Published in Black Boss: Political Revolution in a Georgia County by John Rozier, Athens, Ga.: University of Georgia Press, 1982.

Scope and Content Note

The collection consists primarily of source material for John Rozier's study of political leadership in Hancock County, Georgia, Black Boss: Political Revolution in a Georgia County, published by the University of Georgia Press in 1982. The book chronicles the political rise of John McCown, an African American who arrived in Hancock County in 1966 to begin massive poverty-fighting programs. Hancock County became the first black-controlled county in the south since Reconstruction. Most of the source material in this collection consists of newspaper clippings documenting the activities of McCown, the Georgia Council on Human Relations, and the East Central Committee for Opportunity. Correspondence, memoranda, materials relating to a 1974 riot, and McCown's criminal record document the tensions between black and white residents of the county. The collection also includes Rozier's research notes, typescripts of three chapters, and notes on oral interviews of residents of Hancock County in the 1960s and 1970s.

Arrangement Note

Arranged by subject.


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Container List

Black Boss
Box Folder Content
1 1 Typescript: chapters 1-2
1 2 Typescript: chapter 4
1 3 Copy editor's comments, 1981
1 4 Photos, clippings and correspondence
1 5 National Endowment for the Humanitites, 1976-1980
1 6 Correspondence, 1972-1981
1 7 Reviews, 1982-1986
1 8 Miscellaneous, 1980s
Georgia Council on Human Relations - Source material
2 1 Agendas, annual reports, financial reports, 1966-1967
2 2 Agendas, annual reports, financial reports, 1968-1969
2 3 Agendas, annual reports, financial reports, 1970-1972
2 4 Collected printed material, 1967-1974
2 5 Correspondence, 1965-1972
2 6 Office of Economic Opportunity, 1969-1972
2 7 Ford Foundation, 1970
2 8 Officers of the board, 1970-1972
2 9 Press releases, 1967-1970
Hancock County - Source material
2 10 1959-1969
2 11 1970
2 12 1971-1973
3 1 1974
3 2 1975
3 3 1976
3 4 1977
3 5 1978
3 6 1979
3 7 1980
3 8 1981
3 9 1982
3 10 1983
3 11 1984
3 12 1985
General source material
4 1 Atlanta Constitution series on Hancock County, 1974
4 2 Macon Telegraph series on Hancock County, 1974
4 3 Clippings, Hancock County riots, 1974
4 4 Biographical file on John McCown
4 5 Notecards
4 6 Notecards
4 7 Notecards
4 8 Notecards
4 9 Notecards
Interview notes and Interviews
5 1 Interview notes
5 2 Interview notes
5 3 Court records and source material
5 4 Bibliography cards
5 5 Interviews, A-B
5 6 Interviews, C-F
5 7 Interviews, G-L
5 8 Interviews, M-P
5 9 Interviews, R-W
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