STANTON, FRANK LEBBY, 1857-1927.
Frank Lebby Stanton papers, 1885-1978

Emory University

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/8zwzr


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Stanton, Frank Lebby, 1857-1927.
Title: Frank Lebby Stanton papers, 1885-1978
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 166
Extent: 2 linear feet (5 boxes), 1 oversized papers folder (OP), 1 bound volume (BV), and 1 oversized bound volume (OBV)
Abstract:Papers of Frank Lebby Stanton, poet and journalist, including correspondence, writings, scrapbooks, photographs, cartoons and drawings, clippings and printed materials, biographical notes and short stories.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Unrestricted access.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Related Materials in Other Repositories

Frank L. Stanton papers, Atlanta History Center.

Source

Gift, prior to 1932, with subsequent additions.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], Frank Lebby Stanton papers, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Processed by ELE, January 1984 .


Collection Description

Biographical Note

Frank Lebby Stanton (February 22, 1857-January 7, 1927) poet and journalist, was born in Charleston, South Carolina, the son of Valentine Stanton, a printer, and Rebecca Parry Stanton. After the death of his father, (ca. 1868), Stanton's formal education ended and his family moved to Savannah, Georgia, where he went to work for the Savannah Morning News as a printer's devil. Joel Chandler Harris began work with the Morning News as an associate editor in 1870 and encouraged young Stanton to write. Stanton became a reporter and feature writer for the News, then moved in 1887 to Smithville, Georgia, where he edited the Smithville News. While in Smithville, he met and married Leona Josey. They had three children, Valentine (Val), born ca. 1890, Frank Jr., born 1895, and Marcelle, born ca. 1900.

After a brief period with the Rome (Ga.) Tribune, Stanton moved to Atlanta in 1889 at the suggestion of Joel Chandler Harris, who had been on the staff of the Atlanta Constitution since 1876. Stanton achieved notoriety with his daily column "Just From Georgia," which began publication ca. 1890 in the Constitution and continued until 1926. A compilation of poems, short stories, and philosophical advice, the column was one of the first of its kind to be published in the United States. Stanton's work was also published in magazines such as the Uncle Remus Magazine and The Christian Index, but it was the syndication of "Just From Georgia" which vastly increased his popularity as the "James Whitcomb Riley of the South," and as a "scrapbook poet."

Popular poems written by Stanton and inspired by his family are "Mighty Lak a Rose," "Jest a Wearyin' for You," and "Marcelle." The first collection of his poetry, Songs of a Day and Songs of the Soil, was published in 1892. It was followed by Songs of the Soil (1894), Comes One with a Song (1899), Songs from Dixie Land (1900), Up from Georgia, (1902), and Little Folks Down South (1904). Frank L. Stanton's Just from Georgia, compiled by his daughter Marcelle Stanton Megahee was published in 1927, after Stanton's death in that same year. Frank Stanton is buried in Westview Cemetery, Atlanta.

Biographical Source:Biographical information on Stanton can be found in the Dictionary of American Biography (Scribner's, 1935) and in biographical clippings located in Subseries 1.4 of the collection.

Frank Lebby Stanton (February 22, 1857-January 7, 1927) poet and journalist, was born in Charleston, South Carolina, the son of Valentine Stanton, a printer, and Rebecca Parry Stanton. After the death of his father, (ca. 1868), Stanton's formal education ended and his family moved to Savannah, Georgia, where he went to work for the Savannah Morning News as a printer's devil. Joel Chandler Harris began work with the Morning News as an associate editor in 1870 and encouraged young Stanton to write. Stanton became a reporter and feature writer for the News, then moved in 1887 to Smithville, Georgia, where he edited the Smithville News. While in Smithville, he met and married Leona Josey. They had three children, Valentine (Val), born ca. 1890, Frank Jr., born 1895, and Marcelle, born ca. 1900.

After a brief period with the Rome (Ga.) Tribune, Stanton moved to Atlanta in 1889 at the suggestion of Joel Chandler Harris, who had been on the staff of the Atlanta Constitution since 1876. Stanton achieved notoriety with his daily column "Just From Georgia," which began publication ca. 1890 in the Constitution and continued until 1926. A compilation of poems, short stories, and philosophical advice, the column was one of the first of its kind to be published in the United States. Stanton's work was also published in magazines such as the Uncle Remus Magazine and The Christian Index, but it was the syndication of "Just From Georgia" which vastly increased his popularity as the "James Whitcomb Riley of the South," and as a "scrapbook poet."

Popular poems written by Stanton and inspired by his family are "Mighty Lak a Rose," "Jest a Wearyin' for You," and "Marcelle." The first collection of his poetry, Songs of a Day and Songs of the Soil, was published in 1892. It was followed by Songs of the Soil (1894), Comes One with a Song (1899), Songs from Dixie Land (1900), Up from Georgia, (1902), and Little Folks Down South (1904). Frank L. Stanton's Just from Georgia, compiled by his daughter Marcelle Stanton Megahee was published in 1927, after Stanton's death in that same year. Frank Stanton is buried in Westview Cemetery, Atlanta.

Biographical Source:Biographical information on Stanton can be found in the Dictionary of American Biography (Scribner's, 1935) and in biographical clippings located in Subseries 1.4 of the collection.

Scope and Content Note

These papers consist of materials produced by Frank L. Stanton, his family, and associates. They are divided into three main series, each titled by its originator or subject: Frank L. Stanton, Atlanta Constitution/Julian Harris, and Frank L. Stanton, Jr. Provenance of some items among this material is unclear and some of these specific items are mentioned in the series notes when appropriate.

The collection contains correspondence (1890-1948), handwritten and printed Stanton poems (ca. 1885-1921), scrapbooks (1895-1920, 1978), music and broadsides, photographs, cartoons and drawings, clippings and printed materials, biographical notes and short stories. Dated material bulks in the years between 1900 and 1928.

The collection's strength lies in the abundance of Stanton poetry and prose, preserved here in various stages of development. A major weakness is in the inability of Stanton's own papers to provide a more personal view of his life. A unique feature of the collection is the inclusion of material offering a look at the less public side of Stanton from the viewpoint of fellow journalist, Julian LaRose Harris.

Arrangement Note

Organized into three series: (1) Frank Stanton papers, (2) Atlanta Constitution / Julian Larose Harris papers and (3) Frank L. Stanton, Jr. papers.


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Description of Series

v1.11.0-dev