STOUT, SAMUEL HOLLINGSWORTH, 1822-1903.
Samuel Hollingsworth Stout papers, 1800-1899

Emory University

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/8zxgx


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Stout, Samuel Hollingsworth, 1822-1903.
Title: Samuel Hollingsworth Stout papers, 1800-1899
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 274
Extent: 1.75 linear feet (4 boxes), 1 oversized papers box (OP), and 1 microfilm reel (MF)
Abstract:Papers of Civil War surgeon and hospital administrator Samuel Hollingsworth Stout including correspondence, notes and writings by Stout, personal and official military records, and posthumous material about Stout.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Unrestricted access.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Related Materials in Other Repositories

Samuel Hollingsworth Stout papers, Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin; Samuel Hollingsworth Stout papers, Georgia Historical Society; Samuel Hollingsworth Stout collection, University of Tennessee Libraries, Special Collections; Samuel Hollingsworth Stout papers, Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Samuel Hollingsworth Stout papers, Western Reserve Historical Society, Samuel Hollingsworth Stout papers, Tennessee State Library and Archives.

Source

Gift, with subsequent purchases.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], Samuel Hollingsworth Stout papers, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Processed by BJM, 1989.


Collection Description

Biographical Note

Samuel Hollingsworth Stout (March 2, 1822-September 18, 1903), Civil War surgeon and hospital administrator, was born in Nashville, Tennessee to Samuel Van Dyke Stout and Catherine (Tannehill) Stout. He earned an A.B. (1839) and an A.M. (1842) from the University of Nashville, and studied medicine intermittently at the University of Pennsylvania during the 1840s receiving a medical degree in 1848. After building a successful rural practice in Giles County, Tennessee, Stout entered the Provisional Army of Tennessee in 1861 as a surgeon. In 1863 he was appointed Medical Director of Hospitals for the Department and Army of Tennessee. Later, his territory expanded to include all hospitals between the Savannah and Mississippi Rivers.

Stout was well known during his career for his able administration of military hospitals. By requiring military discipline, improving sanitation and ventilation, emphasizing mobility, and combining strategic and medical skills, Stout won the confidence of the Confederate high command and rose rapidly to one of the most powerful positions in the medical hierarchy. His hospitals were forerunners of the highly mobile hospitals of World War II.

Following the war, Stout taught for a time at the Atlanta Medical College, then returned to Nashville to supervise the Confederate Orphan Asylum. During the 1870's and l880's, he set up general practices in Roswell, Georgia and Cisco, Texas. In the early 1880's, he set up general practices in Roswell, Georgia and Cisco, Texas. In the early 1890's he became professor of obstetrics at the University of Dallas. Stout also published several articles during these years on private medical practice, gynecology, and history. Due to his own classical training, Stout had an enduring interest in education. In addition to his medical teaching, he taught in a Nashville academy, helped to establish public schools in Atlanta and Cisco, and sought the position of Commissioner of Education in the administration of President Grover Cleveland.

Stout married Martha Abernathy, daughter of Thomas Abernathy of Giles County, Tennessee, on April 6, 1848. They had two daughters, Katherine and Margaret. Following the war, Stout resided in Roswell, Georgia, and Cisco and Dallas, Texas. He died in Clarendon, Texas.

Samuel Hollingsworth Stout (March 2, 1822-September 18, 1903), Civil War surgeon and hospital administrator, was born in Nashville, Tennessee to Samuel Van Dyke Stout and Catherine (Tannehill) Stout. He earned an A.B. (1839) and an A.M. (1842) from the University of Nashville, and studied medicine intermittently at the University of Pennsylvania during the 1840s receiving a medical degree in 1848. After building a successful rural practice in Giles County, Tennessee, Stout entered the Provisional Army of Tennessee in 1861 as a surgeon. In 1863 he was appointed Medical Director of Hospitals for the Department and Army of Tennessee. Later, his territory expanded to include all hospitals between the Savannah and Mississippi Rivers.

Stout was well known during his career for his able administration of military hospitals. By requiring military discipline, improving sanitation and ventilation, emphasizing mobility, and combining strategic and medical skills, Stout won the confidence of the Confederate high command and rose rapidly to one of the most powerful positions in the medical hierarchy. His hospitals were forerunners of the highly mobile hospitals of World War II.

Following the war, Stout taught for a time at the Atlanta Medical College, then returned to Nashville to supervise the Confederate Orphan Asylum. During the 1870's and l880's, he set up general practices in Roswell, Georgia and Cisco, Texas. In the early 1880's, he set up general practices in Roswell, Georgia and Cisco, Texas. In the early 1890's he became professor of obstetrics at the University of Dallas. Stout also published several articles during these years on private medical practice, gynecology, and history. Due to his own classical training, Stout had an enduring interest in education. In addition to his medical teaching, he taught in a Nashville academy, helped to establish public schools in Atlanta and Cisco, and sought the position of Commissioner of Education in the administration of President Grover Cleveland.

Stout married Martha Abernathy, daughter of Thomas Abernathy of Giles County, Tennessee, on April 6, 1848. They had two daughters, Katherine and Margaret. Following the war, Stout resided in Roswell, Georgia, and Cisco and Dallas, Texas. He died in Clarendon, Texas.

Scope and Content Note

The Samuel Hollingsworth Stout papers contain correspondence, notes and writings by Stout, personal and official records, and posthumous material about Stout. The bulk of the papers was created between 1861 and 1865. Series 1, Personal and Official Correspondence, 1847-1955, consists mainly of official correspondence of the Medical Department of the Confederate Army. Pre-Civil War correspondence relates to Stout family history and Stout's application for a commission in the United States Navy. In addition to general official correspondence, the Civil War papers include general and special orders, circulars, and reports from subordinate medical officers relating to personnel, supplies, transportation of sick and wounded, and transport of entire hospitals. The Civil War group of papers also includes an order book for Flewellen Hospital, Cassville, Georgia, which contains general and special orders, circulars, forms and questionnaires received by Flewellen Hospital (on microfilm).

Several pieces of correspondence refer to specific campaigns, including Chickamauga, Vicksburg, and Atlanta. While troop movements and military strategy are rarely mentioned, these letters document the dislocation experienced even by hospitals well behind the front lines, as well as providing statistics on dead and wounded and information on Andersonville Prison (1865). Letters dated l866-l903 deal with Stout's unsuccessful attempts to obtain a grant to write a history of the Hospital Department and to secure a position in the Cleveland Administration. This group of letters also includes personal correspondence with wartime associates. Post-1903 correspondence is primarily that of Stout's daughters and includes letters of sympathy on Stout's death and correspondence in regard to disposition of Stout's Civil War records.

Most of the series consists of chronologically arranged original documents. Included are some negative photostatic copies of these original and/or microfilmed items which are interfiled in Series 1. The microfilm contains several groups of unique, mainly official correspondence, 1861-1950. Each group of microfilmed correspondence is arranged more or less chronologically. Some of the material on microfilm is also available as photocopies, filed in a separate chronological sequence at the end of Series 1.

Series 2 consists of official records, such as requisitions, receipts, lists of surgeons, and statistics on dead and wounded. Another group of similar official records is on microfilm. A floor plan for an army hospital is also in Series 2 (OP 1). Personal records, including deeds, certificates, photographs, and Stout family materials are located in Series 3. Photographs include images of Samuel Stout, of his family, of his associates and friends, and of a memorial marker at Kingston Way Home [Kingston, Georgia?] which honors the founders of this first Confederate Hospital. Series 4, Notes and Writings, includes Stout's medical school class notes which are the earliest material in the collection. Stout's short biographical notes on the surgeons serving under him during the Civil War and various published and unpublished writings are also in this series. Series 5 includes posthumous biographical material about Stout, and reveals the high esteem with which he was regarded by contemporaries. Recent additions placed in this series are research papers about Stout or based on research in the Stout manuscripts.

Series 6 include additions received since the initial processing of the collection in 1989. The arrangement parallels that of the original first five series. Series 6 contains correspondence, official records, writings by Stout about his career in the Confederate Army, and articles about Stout from the Confederate Veteran 1895, 1897. Correspondents include Samuel Merrifield Bemiss (1821-1884), Braxton Bragg (1817-1876), Edward Archelaus Flewellen (1819-1910), Andrew Jackson Foard (1829-1868), Robert Coleman Foster (1825-1879), Danville Leadbetter (1811-1866), Samuel Preston Moore (1813-1889), William Lytle Nichol (1828-1901), and Benjamin Miller Wible (1814-1877). Individuals represented in the photographs include Thomas Edward Stout, F. E. Daniel, Edward Archelaus Flewellen, and Charles B. Johnson.

Arrangement Note

Organized into six series: (1) Personal and official correspondence, (2) Official records, (3) Personal records, (4) Notes and writingsw, (5) Posthumous materials about Stout, (6) Additions


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