TAYLOR, THOMAS THOMSON, B. 1837.
Thomas Thomson Taylor papers, 1861-1865

Emory University

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/8zxxq


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Taylor, Thomas Thomson, b. 1837.
Title: Thomas Thomson Taylor papers, 1861-1865
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 354
Extent: .25 linear feet (1 box) ; 2 microfilm reels (MF)
Abstract:Microfilm copy of the papers of Thomas Thomson Taylor, Union soldier, politican, lawyer, and newspaper reporter, including correspondence to and from Taylor, five small diaries, and several miscellaneous items such as copies of General Orders and Circulars and a newspaper clipping.
Language:Materials entirely in English.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Unrestricted access.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

All requests subject to limitations noted in departmental policies on reproduction.

Additional Physical Form

Typescripts of portions of the diaries of Thomas Taylor (June 1 - December 13, 1864) and 22 letters of Netta Taylor to Thomas Taylor (1861-1864) are also available.

Source

Loaned for copying, 1960.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], Thomas Thomson Taylor papers, Manuscript, Archives and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Processed by MRD, 1956.


Collection Description

Biographical Note

Thomas Thomson Taylor (b. September 28, 1837), enlisted in Company I of the 12th Ohio Infantry Regiment at Georgetown, Ohio in April of 1861. In May, he was elected 1st Lieutenant of the Company. By August, he had raised a company which was mustered into the 47th as Company F and he was elected Captain. In recognition of his fidelity in reporting the plot and plan of the Knights of the Golden Circle to resist the draft, he was promoted to Major by the Governor of Ohio, eventually reaching the rank of Colonel.

His first campaigns were in West Virginia. He was in the Battle of Carnifex Ferry; was at Big Sewell Mountain, Gauley Bridge; Lewisburg; and in the fall of 1862 saw duty at Point Pleasant and in the Kanawha Valley. Early in 1863 he went to the lower Mississippi Valley and arrived in Vicksburg the day before its surrender. He participated in the siege and capture of Jackson, Mississippi, fought at Mission Ridge, Tennessee, and Larkin's Landing, Alabama.

After a veteran's furlough he participated in the Atlanta Campaign, serving on the staff of Brig. General M. L. Smith as Chief of Outposts and Skirmishes of the Second Division. During 120 days, he participated in battles of Snakes Creek Gap, Resaca, Dallas, New Hope Church, Jonesboro and the Fall of Atlanta. From July 22 until September 30, 1864, he was in charge of the Regiment. He started out on "Sherman's March to the Sea" and was in the advance and assault at the capture of Fort McAllister, Georgia. When he was severely wounded in his right hand, he was ordered to Grant's Officer's Hospital at Cincinnati and later served as a member of the Military Court at Washington, D. C. An order for staff duty in charge of the Judiciary Department with the 15th Army Corps in Texas and Mexico was never implemented. He was mustered out at Camp Dennison, Ohio, late in August, 1865. Taylor spent the last 25 years of his life in Lake Charles, Louisiana. He was a lawyer, politician, and newspaper editor. He was the father of two sons and a daughter before the end of the Civil War and may have had other children. Biographical information was taken from Tom Taylor’s Civil War by Albert Castel (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2000).

Thomas Thomson Taylor (b. September 28, 1837), enlisted in Company I of the 12th Ohio Infantry Regiment at Georgetown, Ohio in April of 1861. In May, he was elected 1st Lieutenant of the Company. By August, he had raised a company which was mustered into the 47th as Company F and he was elected Captain. In recognition of his fidelity in reporting the plot and plan of the Knights of the Golden Circle to resist the draft, he was promoted to Major by the Governor of Ohio, eventually reaching the rank of Colonel.

His first campaigns were in West Virginia. He was in the Battle of Carnifex Ferry; was at Big Sewell Mountain, Gauley Bridge; Lewisburg; and in the fall of 1862 saw duty at Point Pleasant and in the Kanawha Valley. Early in 1863 he went to the lower Mississippi Valley and arrived in Vicksburg the day before its surrender. He participated in the siege and capture of Jackson, Mississippi, fought at Mission Ridge, Tennessee, and Larkin's Landing, Alabama.

After a veteran's furlough he participated in the Atlanta Campaign, serving on the staff of Brig. General M. L. Smith as Chief of Outposts and Skirmishes of the Second Division. During 120 days, he participated in battles of Snakes Creek Gap, Resaca, Dallas, New Hope Church, Jonesboro and the Fall of Atlanta. From July 22 until September 30, 1864, he was in charge of the Regiment. He started out on "Sherman's March to the Sea" and was in the advance and assault at the capture of Fort McAllister, Georgia. When he was severely wounded in his right hand, he was ordered to Grant's Officer's Hospital at Cincinnati and later served as a member of the Military Court at Washington, D. C. An order for staff duty in charge of the Judiciary Department with the 15th Army Corps in Texas and Mexico was never implemented. He was mustered out at Camp Dennison, Ohio, late in August, 1865. Taylor spent the last 25 years of his life in Lake Charles, Louisiana. He was a lawyer, politician, and newspaper editor. He was the father of two sons and a daughter before the end of the Civil War and may have had other children. Biographical information was taken from Tom Taylor’s Civil War by Albert Castel (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2000).

Scope and Content Note

The collection consists of a microfilm copy and some typescript copies of the papers of Thomas Thomson Taylor from 1861-1865. The microfilmed materials include correspondence, printed materials and photographs, five small diaries, and several miscellaneous items such as copies of General Orders and Circulars. The correspondence consists of letters between Taylor and his wife and were written during the Civil War from 1861-1865. The letters are well written, with vivid descriptions of the scenery, the people, food, the whereabouts of Union and Confederate forces, scouting expeditions, the capture of prisoners. He grows very despondent at times and expresses disappointment with the conduct of the war, calls himself an American slave with Lincoln as his master and Logan as his overseer. He describes Lincoln's second inauguration and the crowds celebrating the capture of Richmond. He makes suggestions as to the treatment of freedmen. The diaries begin in October 1863 while Taylor was near Iuka, Mississippi and end December 13, 1864 with the attack on Ft. McAllister during which Taylor's hand was injured.

The collection also includes typescripts of a portion of the Taylor diaries from June 1 - December 13, 1864 and 22 of the letters from Netta Taylor to Thomas Taylor.

Arrangement Note

Organized on microfilm in four groups: Letters of Thomas Taylor; Printed materials and photographs; Letters of his wife, Netta Taylor; and Diaries of Thomas Taylor. Each group of letters arranged in chronological order.


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Container List

Thomas Thomson Taylor correspondence, 1861-1865
Box Folder Content
MF1 1861 April 25 - May 1. Camp Jackson, Columbus, Ohio. 3 letters. Reached Camp Jackson Columbus, Ohio. 4 p.m. April 25 and encamped. About 8,000 men from various places in Ohio. Mentions fear of poisoned water (by spies), exorbitant prices, profiteering "contractors," description of Camp Jackson and of the Adjutant General.
MF1 1861 May 8 - June 22. Camp Dennison, Ohio. 10 letters. Arrived at 2 p.m. Describes camp site and his new uniform. Shows concern about problems at home. Undecided about a three years enlistment period. On June 20, General McClellan and his staff passed through.
MF1 1861 June 27. Broadway Hotel. Described officers and men of various regiments. Gives schedule of a typical day.
MF1 1861 July 28. Camp Clay. He has been home and is discouraged about his company.
MF1 1861 August 4 - 7. Camp Dennison, Ohio. 2 letters. Still depressed about filling his company, his own chances for advancement.
MF1 1861 August 27. Camp Ewing, Virginia. Letter possibly circa 1862. He mentions last year as if he had been trying to recruit a company then - 1861?
MF1 1861 September 1-18 Camp Weston, Virginia. 8 letters. He has his commission as Captain for three years safe in his trunk. He has been to Western Virginia. and describes the scenery. He is "Judge Advocate of the Post, a place where trains of government waggons pass continually, and full of "secessionists." Treachery feared. Reviewed by General Rosecranz. On September 18 received orders to advance 95 miles. He is sorry to leave - had hoped to publish a Union paper in the town and perhaps begin practicing law.
MF1 1861 September 22 - Camp at Sutton, Virginia. 1 letter. Tells of several days march with troops through country full of "secesh."
MF1 1861 September 25 Camp at Summerville, Virginia. Finds houses along road deserted. They slaughter and eat many deserted pigs, chickens, cattle, etc.
MF1 1861 September 27 - Camp at Cross Lanes, Virginia. 1 letter. Miles, his son, will be 3? years old September 28
MF1 1861 September 30 - Camp Scott, Virginia. 6 letters.
MF1 1861 October 24. He has sketched a map of the battlefield, which he encloses. Gives route of march, apparently along the Parkersburg Railroad. This is an account of his marching since he has been in Virginia., the country, people, food, whereabouts of Union and Confederate forces, capture of prisoners, scouting expeditions. He says (October 16) "I came out here to make a reputation some way and I am going to try for it." He is making money - $130 a month, and it costs only $5 a week to live.
MF1 1861 November 30 - Gallispolis, Ohio. 1 letter. Arrived at Gallipolis, having come from Cincinnati. He will spend the winter at Cross Lanes. Tells of winter plans of various regiments.
MF1 1861 December 4 - 6 Camp Huddleson, Virginia. 2 letters. He had come up the river from Gallipolis. His regiment will winter "two and a half miles above Gauley Bridge on the Tompkins farm in Sibley tents."
MF1 1861 December 10-12 Camp Mt. Gouley, Virginia. 2 letters. He has been made Paymaster's clerk and may get to travel about the state.
MF1 1861 December 16-26 Charleston, Virginia. - Barboursville, West Virginia. 3 letters. Camp Red House. He continues his travels as Assistant Paymaster.
MF1 1862 January 1 Wheeling, Virginia. 1 letter. He spent a New Year's holiday here. Sends picture of himself and several comrades.
MF1 1862 January 8-30 Camp Gauley Mtn., Virginia. 9 letters. Some of his "boys" face serious charges. If the decision goes against them, he may resign. He believes his superior, Colonel Elliott, is prejudiced against them and him. He describes the camp and fortifications. Apparently he wrote news for his hometown newspaper. He is still anxious to add recruits to his company.
MF1 1862 February 2-March 19 Camp Gauley Mtn., Virginia. 14 letters. Tells of "reception of Colonel Poschner" by the troops on March 10. He writes details of "a company inspection" on Sunday morning, then March 13 a typical day from revielle to taps. His boys are on trial at Charleston (West Virginia). He gives his reasons for believing they will soon advance towards the enemy. (In late March and early April he had a leave and went home.)
MF1 1862 April 11-30 Camp Gauley Mtn., Virginia. 7 letters. Camp Gauley Mtn., Virginia. He is very impatient to get into a real battle. Expects they will meet enemy at Gordonsville, Virginia
MF1 1862 May ? - little Sewal Mountain. 1 letter, written on a Confederate Letterhead. Was surrounded by Rebel forces but got out with his scouting party. Describes a fight on or near Blue Sulphur Road - he and Captains Wallace and Pugh. They followed them to within one mile of White Sulphur Springs which he describes.
MF1 1862 May 12-19 In or near Lewisburg, Virginia 4 letters. His regiment is now in the 3rd Brigade under command of Colonel Quick? of the 36th Regiment. He "had the pleasure" of being in the Lewisburg fight. He is "now beginning to learn what soldiering is" - no tents, no changes of clothing. He likes the excitement of scouting.
MF1 1862 May 24-June 17 Camp Meadow Bluffs, Virginia 12 letters. His boys (on trial) have been sentenced too severely, he thinks. His company is not full and he may resign. Reports another fight engaged in near "Greenbrier Bridge, which the rebels burned." He apparently expects "extracts" from his letters to be "published in the Argus." He drafted charges against the Lt. Colonel for Capt. W. H. Ward, and mailed the letter or document but nothing had (so far) been heard from it.
MF1 1862 June 3 They are waiting for General Cox's forces before they advance for fear they will be outflanked. The 28 commissed Officers under Lt. Colonel L. S. Elliott asked him to countermand his order that officers must receive passes countersigned by himself before they could pass the Camp Guards. See Petition dated June 9, 1862. Thomas fears that he is misjudged by friends at home because of "exaggerated statements of their treatment" made by some of the men under him. General Cox is "slow ... he remains on Flat Top Mt. as though it were Mt. Olivet or some other sacred place." On June 15 he gives a recapitulation of his actions since leaving home with the army. On June 21 - "We have grown tired of waiting for Heath, & J. Loving so 4 a.m. this morning we start to hunt them up."
MF1 1862 June 24 - Salt Sulphur Springs. 1 letter. They capture a quantity of supplies, - cattle, bacon, flour, horses, wagons, guns, etc. left behind by retreating rebels.
MF1 1862 June 29 - July 31. Camp Meadow Bluff, N.C. 13 letters. He is thinking of moving west, buying land and starting "with the country," after the war. He praises the security of army life one day but the next declares it is based not on patriotism but on pride & ambition. He says the women of that section are replenishing it with half blood Yankees.
MF1 1862 July 13 - He gives his opinion of Vallandigham and Sam Medary, but he is still a Democrat.
MF1 1862 July 25 - He is discouraged over Union Army prospects. If Lt. Colonel Elliott returns, he (Thomas) will resign, he says.
MF1 1862 August 2 - 13 Camp Meadow Bluffs, Virginia. 3 letters. Instructions about selling his mess chest. He wants a furlough.
MF1 1862 August 13 - Cox is a "granny," afraid to dare.
MF1 1862 August 18 - September 2 Camp Ewing, Virginia 6 letters. August 29 - He has resigned? from the bar? from the army.
MF1 1862 November 3 or 4 will be a year since he was in Georgetown.
MF1 1862 September 5 - 8 Summerville, Virginia. 3 letters. He describes position of his company in an expected attack by the enemy. If he is to winter anywhere in Western Virginia he wants his wife to stay either in Summerville or Charleston. The Kanawha River is in rebel hands and mail from Gallipolis is held up. He is critical of the government's prosecution of the war.
MF1 1862 September 18. "Steamer Mary Cook" 1 letter. Wednesday of the previous week his company began retreat; burned vast amount of stores and equipment and went to relief of "the forces on Newton?" They were cut off, burned all baggage, "every-thing." Rebels in close pursuit, skirmishing, marching. Finally reached Charleston where "the 47th regiment were left with Howitzer and battery to fight and hold Charleston." He asks his wife to visit him.
MF1 1862 September 28?-October
MF1 1862 October 20-23 - (3 letters) Camp Kanawha, Virginia and Camp 47th Regiment O.V.D. in the field. They marched up the Kanawha River. He will try to be appointed Judge Advocate on General Cox's staff. "Colonel Elliott has been released from arrest and will resume command of the Regiment as soon as he becomes strong enough." He had visitors from home. (The rebels have been cutting bridges.) They are rebuilding and preparing for a general advance. He does not think they will go far because of lack of "transportation." He is still weak but improving.
MF1 1862 October 29 - (1 letter) Portsmouth, Ohio. He will be on recruiting service for 20 days. Recalls skirmishing near Poco Creek on the Kanawha and Coals Mouth.
MF1 1862 November 14 - 17 - (2 letters) Columbus, Ohio, He may be "dismissed." He believes his family needs him and he is tired of the service. He has explained to Colonel Elliott his reason for "remaining absent." He is "determined to leave in an honorable manner if possible - dishonorable if must; that I shall quit is a foregone conclusion." He has not heard from Colonel Elliott. He will not have time to go home before rejoining his company.
MF1 1862 November 21 - (1 letter) Charleston, Virginia. He may procure a detail for the winter.
MF1 1862 November 24 - 27 (2 letters) Camp Gouley Mt.
MF1 1863 January 22 - (1 letter) Cincinnati, Ohio. He is going to Columbus. Colonel Elliott has resigned for personal reasons. His regiment has "gone up the Yazoo River to Vicksburg."
MF1 1863 February 27 - (1 letter) Camp Gouley Mt. One of his boys has died of measles.
MF1 1863 March 12 - April 18. Broadway Hotel, Cincinnati, Ohio. He expects to be returned to his regiment. But (April 13) he is to remain and expects "another party" (to help him with recruiting?) April 17, He has had a promotion. Capt. W. R. Looker promised to talk with the Governor (about him?) He reviews circumstances of his promotion.
MF1 1863 June 25 - (1 letter) Memphis, Tennessee He is rejoining his regiment. He describes Memphis.
MF1 1863 June 28 - (3 letters) In or near Vicksburg, Mississippi. June 28 he is at Lake Providence. Describes plantations along the river. Describes an engagement of gunboats on the Mississippi River. July 2 at Walmut Hills, Miss. He received a great welcome from his regiment, and is made caterer of Headquarters mess. They are digging mines under the rebel fortifications at Vicksburg. He describes place and action. A Confederate Lt. is captured, who said the rebels on the previous Tuesday had "issued the last army ration and were living on rations furnished by citizens of Vicksburg." July 4 at Walnut Hills. The "great stronghold is fallen." Describes surrender of Vicksburg and appearance of rebel soldiers.
MF1 1863 July 8 - (1 letter) Camp Bakers Creek. They are in hot pursuit of General Johnston. The country "totally devastated and depopulated." Does not expect Rebels to make a stand before Chattanooga.
MF1 1863 July 15 - (1 letter) Camp in front of Jackson, Mississippi. Tells of acquiring some "checks" for the purpose of getting Jeff Davis "autograph."
MF1 1863 July 19 - State Auditors Office, Jackson, Mississippi. He is quartered in the Mississippi. State House, Tells of his work (as Ass't Provost Marshall for the day) in the Jackson fire - much pillaging and disorder. Found quantities of sugar, rice and molasses in hands of speculators. Receives Confederate deserters and much abandoned ammunition, hundreds of bales of cotton. Had not heard from "Uncle Grafton; apparently a resident of Jackson, Mississippi. Expect to start for Vicksburg the next day.
MF1 1863 July 29 - (1 letter) Camp Sherman, Mississippi. His wife had written of Morgan's raid into Ohio. Captain Ward has just arrived and Thomas promises to be "guarded and watchful "in his "actions and conversation." His army corps may go to Natchez soon.
MF1 1863 July 26 - (1 letter) Camp at Fox's Plantation. They have evacuated Jackson and returned to this place 12 miles from Vicksburg.
MF1 1863 August 11 - September 26 - (11 letters) Camp Sherman. He has had a severe case of "bilious fever" but is improving. Between $2,000,000 and $3,000,000 payroll money was sunk by the "burning of the Ruth." He describes an affair between Colonel Sieber and himself concerned with negro female servants in the camp (August 19) Reports interview between officers and Colonel Sieber. (August 31) His division drilled before Major General W. T. Sherman and Brigadier General Lightburne. (September 11) Colonel Parry returned and took back command of regiment exercised by Thomas in his absence. The army is living well. He is now Judge Advocate of a General Court Martial. he is leaving for Memphis and post duty in Tennessee.
MF1 1863 October 1 - (1 letter) Steamer Adams, Hdqtrs 47th OVI. He would like to be "detached" to get rid of (among other things) the pestiferous presence of Ward.
MF1 1863 October 6 - (1 letter) Camp near Memphis, Tennessee. They have been ordered to be ready to move at a moments notice. They are to march to Coldwater, (Mississippi)
MF1 1863 October 8 - (1 letter) Camp near German town, Tennessee. They are ordered to be in Corinth, Mississippi in three days.
MF1 1863 October 13 - ( 1 letter) Camp at Pocahontas. He says he has "thrown twenty tickets in our regiment and three or four times that number in other regiments against the Vallandingham ticket?
MF1 1863 October 16 - (1 letter) Camp near Corinth, Mississippi. Describes Collierville, La Grange and Grand Junction. They passed through a region known for its Union sentiment - he wishes Ohio were so enthusiastic for the Union. Colonel Sieber has been replaced by General Lightburn in command of the brigade.
MF1 1863 October 19- (1 letter) Iuka, Mississippi. Tells of the reorganization of his brigade now the strongest in the 15th A.C.
MF1 1863 October 22 - 29 - (3 letters) Camp at Cherokee, Alabama He is impressed with land houses and people of North Alabama. Describes a cavalry fight between (General Osterhaus - Union) and a rebel force - "Our loss is about 40 killed or wounded. He hears that Grant is now in command of the armies of the whole South. This includes a note of November 1.
MF1 1863 November 10 - (1 letter) Camp near La Fayette, Tennessee. They try, and condemn to death a Confederate spy.
MF1 1863 November 18 - (1 letter) Camp at Bridgeport, Alabama. Expects to go to front. His corps is "to clear Lookout Mountain" He explains order in which 2nd, 3rd, and 4th divisions will go and how they will attack.
MF1 1863 November 22 - (1 letter) Camp on Mt. near Chattanooga, Tennessee. He describes march from Bridgeport, Lookout Mountain and other scenic places, the situation around Chattanooga, location of army.
MF1 1863 December 20 - 31 - (1 letter) Camp near Bridgeport, Alabama. He summarizes movements of previous month. Details of Battle of Missionary Ridge and the fight at Tunnel Hill. Describes abandoned Rebel supplies near Chickamauga, burning of factory, mill, etc. at Graysvillet Georgia. He is "rejoiced" over birth of a son, Carr White Taylor.
MF1 1864 January 8 - 11 (1 letter) Larkinsville, Alabama. His regiment, or a portion thereof has reenlisted,
MF1 1864 January 13 - (1 letter) Camp at Bellefonte, Alabama. Are not really settled.
MF1 1864 January 16 - February 19 - (7 letters) Larkinsville, Alabama. Are building winter quarters, which he describes in detail. He relates battle experiences of his horse, "Tom." Describes regiment's pets, dogs, roosters, "cameleons," buzzards. The camp is at Larkin's Ferry on the Tennessee River. He says, "The Majority of the citizens in this country are loyal and several Alabama cavalry regiments are rapidly recruiting." Complains of "monopolies," the few firms that are allowed to trade with the soldiers. He describes General Thomas. They move toward Cleveland, Tennessee. He sees General Thomas and his regiment, is promised a furlough (if enough reenlist?)An undated letter (follows February 19, 1864?) Describes his strategy in getting the necessary number of reenlistments. Describes a "soiree" he attended. Apparently he is on his way home.
MF1 1864 March 9 - 16 - (3 letters) Larkinsville, Alabama. He thinks 3 years is too long a time to stay away from his law practice. His regiment has been mustered in for another three years. He is still looking forward to seeing his family. He says his "company would not accept a reception from our place Georgetown if tendered - They think too bitterly of the scene which occurred when we bade our friends good-bye and the subsequent notice we received."
MF1 1864 May 1 - (1 letter) Cincinnati, Ohio. He acts as counsel in defense of Colonel Parry. He visits a number of influential and "profitable" acquaintances.
MF1 1864 May 5 - 8 - (2 letters) Nashville and Chattanooga. He hears rumor that Johnston is retreating towards Atlanta.
MF1 1864 May 16 - (1 letter) near Resacca, Georgia. "On Friday we left our works at Sugar Valley . . . in advance of the whole army except the Kirkpatrick force." Describes fighting on the Calhoun road.
MF1 1864 May 20 - near Kingston, Georgia. "We outnumber them [the rebels] two to one." "Johnston is conducting the affair on the Fabian principle - His army exhibits less demoralization than any army I ever saw that has retreated so far." He is concerned about lengthening lines of supply.
MF1 1864 May 29 - (1 letter) Dallas, Georgia. Describes battle.
MF1 1864 June 3 - (1 letter) Acworth, Georgia. He occupies Johnston and Hardee's old quarters and finds several Atlanta newspapers (May 26 - June 1, 1864).
MF1 1864 June 12 - 29 - (3 letters) Near or on Kennesaw Mtn. Describes conditions and movements about Kennesaw. Frequently mentions General Osterhaus. Tells of his progress with his troops, up the mountain, "heaviest fighting of the campaign."
MF1 1864 July 4 - (1 letter) Camp at Ruffs Mills, Georgia. Continues description of fighting from "repulse" on little Kennesaw. "Kennesaw, Marietta and some distance beyond the County fell into our hands." Complains that Army of the Cumberland gets credit for achievements of the Army of Tennessee.
MF1 1864 July 9 - (1 letter) Camp on Nick-a-Jack Creek, Georgia. Describes "birdseye view of Atlanta." Two factories claimed protection under English and French flags. Were destroyed and several hundred female workers to be supported by Union Army. Fear that decisive defeat of Johnston would induce him to quit Atlanta and reenforce Richmond is "reason" for slowness in taking Atlanta.
MF1 1864 July 14 - (1 letter) Rossville, (Roswell?) Georgia. Does not expect Sherman to attack Johnston "in works" of Atlanta but to threaten supply lines.
MF1 1864 July 26 - August 4(1 letter) near Atlanta. Recounts events of hard fighting on July 22, "most eventful day of this entire campaign" - a detailed account. He heard that enemy lost 9,000 (he thinks an overestimate) and has not heard how much of the army was engaged. See appendix for material related to his mustering out after 3 years of veteran service.] (August 4, 1864. Georgetown, Ohio. A letter from his brother-in-law, C. A. White, candidate for Congress on Democratic Ticket.)
MF1 1864 August 5 - 22 - (5 letters) Before Atlanta, Georgia. Describes another fight in which Major Brown of the 70th Ohio Volunteer Infantry was mortally wounded. Thomas's resignation has not been accepted. He comments that "our rulers are despots the administration the most despotic of any in the world at the present age." He is disappointed in some of the officers of his regiment. He is despondent about not getting out of service . . . calls himself an American slave with Lincoln as his master, Logan his overseer, the man with the lash. He says, "A large proportion of officers in the old regiments are now conscripts and held to service forcibly against their will.
MF1 1864 September 8 - 18 - (5 letters) Colonel Parry has returned. Thomas's resignation is disapproved. He will apply for leave of absence which apparently he gets.
MF1 1864 October 28 - (1 letter) Chattanooga, Tennessee. He had come by boat from Cincinnati. Mentions officers and friends.
MF1 1864 November 7 - 9 (2 letters) Headquarters 47th O.V.I. He has gone from Chattanooga via Rome, Cave Springs, Cedar Town, Evarts Plantation, Powder Springs, to a place in woods near Ruffs Station about 12 miles from Atlanta. He expects to go "seaward."
MF1 1864 December 15 - (1 letter) Fort McAllister, Georgia. Letter to Mrs. Taylor from S. J. Bonner, Surgeon. The index finger of his right hand was shot and had to be amputated.
MF1 1864 December 20 - (1 letter) Fort McAllister, Georgia. His first letter written with his left hand. He asks her to preserve it. He will leave for home soon.
MF1 1865 January 28 - (1 letter) Officers Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio. February 5 - (1 letter) Purely personal. (Not transcribed.)
MF1 1865 February 19 - June 22 - (56 letters). Washington, D. C. He is working in the General Court Martial. Sees many prominent persons. Finds Washington expensive, muddy, and interesting. He renews friendship with Chilt, whom he considers sincere but mistaken. Chilt introduces him as an Attorney and Counsellor at Law in the U. S. Supreme Court. He describes Lincoln's second inauguration, and Lincoln's appearance. March 30, he goes on board the Monitor Montauk which he describes. He joins crowds celebrating the capture of Richmond, makes suggestions as to education and treatment of freedmen: encloses a letter from General Hazen asking him to return to "the Field." He is opposed to clemency or forgiveness of "rebels." April 15, he describes assassination of Lincoln and the aftermath. He is "amazed" that Sherman has acceded completely to Johnston's terms. He is afraid the Confederacy collapsed too rapidly, may try to rise again. May 19, he expects Governor Brown of Georgia that morning and Jeff Davis in a few days. He describes his view of the Grand Review of troops in Washington. May 29, he says that Major General Hazen has applied to War Dept. to have him "relieved and ordered to report to him at Corps Headquarters" which would probably mean he would be at Louisville, Kentucky, June 2, the order "will not take effect" until the case he is now on is "deposed of." June 17, he describes visit to Mt. Vernon.
MF1 1865 June 25 - (1 letter) Columbia, Pennsylvania. He visited his mother and took her back toWashington and then on home with him.
MF1 1865 July 7- 28 (10 letters) Headquarters 15th A. C. Louisville, Kentucky. He will "contract for one year" with Jim, a Negro whom he has known for 3 years as a servant. He will also apply for a pension. July 9, he hopes to be mustered out as a colonel so as to retire "as high on our State roster " as any who had gone from his town. July 28 he writes "our corps organization is destroyed."
Appended material
MF1 Undated letter to his wife, probably August 1864. Letter to Chilton A. White, his brother-in-law, in which he argues that it is illegal for the government to keep officers in service after the three years for which they enlisted have expired. General orders and ciculars.
Netta Taylor letters
MF1 1861-1865
Diary
MF2 1863 October At this time Taylor was near Iuka, Mississippi. On October 20 he moved into northern Alabama.
MF2 1863 November - December On November 19 went into Tennessee where he remained through December. Taylor was in the Battle of Mission Ridge
MF2 1864 January - March Taylor's regiment moved into Wakefield, Alabama and around January 28 they were near Larkinsville, Alabama. On February 14, 1864 they moved to Chattanooga, on March 19 to Nashville, March 21 to Louisville, Kentucky, March 22 to Cincinnati, Ohio
MF2 1864 April - May After a furlough at home, Taylor started for Nashville April 4, leaving from Cincinnati. May 6 en route to Huntsville, Alabama, May 8, to Chattanooga. In May 1864 he was near Resaca, Georgia. May 13-16; May 18 he reached Adairsville, Georgia.; May 20, at Kingston, Georgia.;
MF2 1864 June On June 4 moved near Acworth, Georgia.
MF2 1864 July - October On July 12, camped near Marietta; July 14, near Roswell, Georgia.; July 19, marched to Decatur; July 20, marched towards Atlanta; July 21-September 17, near Atlanta. There is a gap in the diary from September 17 to October 24, 1864, while Taylor went home on furlough.
MF2 1864 November - December On march through Georgia to Savannah. Diary ends December 13, with attack on Ft. McAllister during which Taylor's hand was injured.
Typescripts
1 1 Diary, June 1 - December 13, 1864
1 2 Netta Taylor correspondence, 1861; Index
1 3 Netta Taylor correspondence, 1862
1 4 Netta Taylor correspondence, 1863
1 5 Netta Taylor correspondence, 1864
v1.11.0-dev