Collection Stored Off-Site

All or portions of this collection are housed off-site. Materials can still be requested but researchers should expect a delay of up to two business days for retrieval.

Series 1
Correspondence, 1941-1995
Boxes 1-13 and 92-93

Scope and Content Note

The correspondence series of the Elbert P. Tuttle papers is organized into two subseries consisting of alphabetical correspondence, 1941-1994, and subject files, 1936-1995. Of particular interest in these early materials is correspondence relating to Tuttle's role in the Republican Party in Georgia, which Tuttle became very active in because he opposed segregationist policies. Judge Tuttle's early life, his college and law-school years, and his 30-years of legal practice in Atlanta prior to government appointment, are all un-represented here. Correspondence and records relating to his long-term military service may be found in Series 5, Personal files.

The correspondence subseries begins in 1941, but the bulk starts in 1953 when Tuttle became General Counsel to the Eisenhower-administration's Treasury Department and continues after he was appointed to the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals in the following year. The correspondence in these files is extremely varied, includes both incoming mail and carbon copies of responses, and ranges from "fan mail" to substantive discussion of social, political, and personal matters. The number of individual correspondents is vast, and, while other judges and lawyers of prominence are well represented, not exclusively from the legal or political communities. The number of files pertaining to commemorations, anniversaries, and awards accelerate into the last years of Tuttle's life.

The subject correspondence also covers a wide range of topics. Particularly well represented are papers regarding Tuttle’s involvement with the colleges and universities of which he was a board member, including life long ties to his alma mater, Cornell. Also represented is correspondence documenting a lengthy involvement with Morehouse, Spelman, the Inter-Denominational Theological Seminary, and other parts of the predominantly black Atlanta University Center. The subseries includes such related materials as bulletins and reports printed for the trustees, correspondence with other board members and with college administrators, including Benjamin Mays, as well as materials relating to Tuttle’s extensive involvement in the elite communities of Atlanta. Much of this material provides insight into the social functioning of that city in the middle and later portions of the 20th Century.

Law related events and organizations that do not relate to the administration of the federal courts are also included in this series. Subjects include the New York University seminar for federal judges, meetings and correspondence of the American Bar Association and the American Law Institute, and mentoring efforts such as law day events, scholarship contests and the National Moot Court Competition, which document Tuttle’s active involvement within the legal community. There are many files in the later years which pertain to the commemoration and recognition of Judge Tuttle and his peers and colleagues, including the Devitt Distinguished Justice Awards, honorary degrees, and courthouse dedications.

Records and correspondence relating to film and literary projects involving the 5th Circuit of the federal courts in the Civil Rights era, such as Jack Bass’s books and several oral history projects are also present here.

Arrangement Note

Organized into two subseries: (1.1) Chronological and alphabetical correspondence and (1.2) Subject correspondence.

Scope and Content Note The correspondence series of the Elbert P. Tuttle papers is organized into two subseries consisting of alphabetical correspondence, 1941-1994, and subject files, 1936-1995. Of particular interest in these early materials is correspondence relating to Tuttle's role in the Republican Party in Georgia, which Tuttle became very active in because he opposed segregationist policies. Judge Tuttle's early life, his college and law-school years, and his 30-years of legal practice in Atlanta prior to government appointment, are all un-represented here. Correspondence and records relating to his long-term military service may be found in Series 5, Personal files. The correspondence subseries begins in 1941, but the bulk starts in 1953 when Tuttle became General Counsel to the Eisenhower-administration's Treasury Department and continues after he was appointed to the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals in the following year. The correspondence in these files is extremely varied, includes both incoming mail and carbon copies of responses, and ranges from "fan mail" to substantive discussion of social, political, and personal matters. The number of individual correspondents is vast, and, while other judges and lawyers of prominence are well represented, not exclusively from the legal or political communities. The number of files pertaining to commemorations, anniversaries, and awards accelerate into the last years of Tuttle's life. The subject correspondence also covers a wide range of topics. Particularly well represented are papers regarding Tuttle’s involvement with the colleges and universities of which he was a board member, including life long ties to his alma mater, Cornell. Also represented is correspondence documenting a lengthy involvement with Morehouse, Spelman, the Inter-Denominational Theological Seminary, and other parts of the predominantly black Atlanta University Center. The subseries includes such related materials as bulletins and reports printed for the trustees, correspondence with other board members and with college administrators, including Benjamin Mays, as well as materials relating to Tuttle’s extensive involvement in the elite communities of Atlanta. Much of this material provides insight into the social functioning of that city in the middle and later portions of the 20th Century. Law related events and organizations that do not relate to the administration of the federal courts are also included in this series. Subjects include the New York University seminar for federal judges, meetings and correspondence of the American Bar Association and the American Law Institute, and mentoring efforts such as law day events, scholarship contests and the National Moot Court Competition, which document Tuttle’s active involvement within the legal community. There are many files in the later years which pertain to the commemoration and recognition of Judge Tuttle and his peers and colleagues, including the Devitt Distinguished Justice Awards, honorary degrees, and courthouse dedications. Records and correspondence relating to film and literary projects involving the 5th Circuit of the federal courts in the Civil Rights era, such as Jack Bass’s books and several oral history projects are also present here.

Description of Subseries

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