YUN, CH‘I-HO, 1865-1945.
Yun Ch‘i-ho papers, 1883-1943

Emory University

Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-6887

rose.library@emory.edu

Permanent link: http://pid.emory.edu/ark:/25593/9030m


Descriptive Summary

Creator: Yun, Ch‘i-ho, 1865-1945.
Title: Yun Ch‘i-ho papers, 1883-1943
Call Number:Manuscript Collection No. 754
Extent: 10.25 linear ft. (21 boxes) and 1 oversized paper (OP)
Abstract:Papers of Methodist teacher and minister Yun Ch'i-ho, mainly consisting of his diaries and material relating to the Korean National Anthem.
Language:Materials mostly in English, with some in Chinese and Japanese.

Administrative Information

Restrictions on Access

Special restrictions apply: Due to the fragile nature of the original diaries, researchers are required to use photocopies. Original autograph manuscript (1945) copy of Korean National Anthem is restricted, researchers may use, but not copy reproductions of this item.

Terms Governing Use and Reproduction

Special restrictions apply: Original and reproductions of Yun's autograph manuscript (1945) of Korean National Anthem may not be reproduced.

Related Materials in This Repository

Young John Allen papers and the Warren Akin Candler papers

Source

Gift of the Yun family, 1990, with subsequent additions.

Citation

[after identification of item(s)], Yun Ch'i-ho papers, Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, Emory University.

Processing

Processed by Barbara J. Mann. 2006.


Collection Description

Biographical Note

Yun Ch'i-ho, Methodist teacher and minister, was born in 1864 in Korea. His father, Yun Woong Niel, was a military officer who became the Minister of War. Yun traveled to Japan to observe Japan's modern institutions and stayed on to continue his education which had begun in Korea (1881-1882). It was here that Commodore Lucius H. Foote, the American Minister-designate to Seoul hired Yun to be his interpreter. Yun returned to Korea in this position and was also appointed as a chusa or secretary in the Korean Foreign Office (1883-1885).

Upon his return, Yun became associated with a group of liberal aristocrats whose mission was to bring Korea into closer contact with the rest of the world. The establishment of a postal department was their first goal. During a banquet held to celebrate the meeting of this goal, a group of assassins descended on the banquet and Yun escaped to the American embassy. Foote arranged for Yun to be smuggled aboard an American ship bound for Shanghai (1885).

In Shanghai, Yun enrolled at the Anglo-Chinese College, a Methodist Episcopal Church institution, operated by Dr. Young John Allen (1885). While here Yun converted to Christianity and was baptized into the Methodist Episcopal Church (April 3, 1887).

Allen made arrangements for Yun to become a theology student at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee (1888-1891). He then transferred to Emory College in Oxford, Georgia (1891-1893). During the summers, while at Emory, Yun visited rural churches to help raise money to support his educational endeavors. Yun was able to save $200 above his needs that was entrusted to Emory's President Warren A. Candler, earmarked for the establishment of a Methodist Church in Korea.

Unable to return to Korea because of the political strife there, he returned to Shanghai as a teacher in the Anglo-Chinese College. While here, he married Mo Tsu-Sung, a Chinese student (1893-1895).

A change in the political situation allowed Yun to finally return to Korea. He was appointed secretary to the Premier and six months later promoted to Vice-Minister of Education. From this position he was named Vice-minister of Foreign Affairs (1895-1896). During this time (1895) Yun helped to establish a Korean mission of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

Yun became involved with the Independence Club, one of the first modern political movements in Korea, and became president and editor of the newsletter The Independent (1896-1898). Because of his political activism, the Korean government sought to remove him from the capital by appointing him as magistrate at Wonsan, and to other posts in Chinnamp'o and Ch'onan (1899-1904). He returned to Seoul and served as Acting Minister of Foreign Affairs (1904-1906).

At this point in his life, Yun decided to abandon his political work and devoted himself to Christian work. Yun established the Anglo-Korean School at Songdo (1906). Yun had always believed that western training in agriculture and manufacturing, coupled with the development of the work ethic, were the ways to help Korea end the cycle of poverty and discontent. The school at Songdo, an industrial school, was established with this goal in mind.

Yun was imprisoned for four years (1911-1915), along with five others, on suspicion of the murder of Japanese Governor-General of Korea, Count Terauchi, due to his underground patriotic activities. Upon his release he continued with his work at Songdo and helped to establish the Korean Y.M.C.A (1915-1925), retiring from active life in 1925. Yun died December 6, 1945. Biographical sources: "Indomitable Baron Yun: An Emory Immortal" by Webb Garrison, Emory University Quarterly, December 1952, and "A Korean at Oxford" by Donald M. Bishop, The Emory Magazine, vol. 52, no. 3, 1976.

Yun Ch'i-ho, Methodist teacher and minister, was born in 1864 in Korea. His father, Yun Woong Niel, was a military officer who became the Minister of War. Yun traveled to Japan to observe Japan's modern institutions and stayed on to continue his education which had begun in Korea (1881-1882). It was here that Commodore Lucius H. Foote, the American Minister-designate to Seoul hired Yun to be his interpreter. Yun returned to Korea in this position and was also appointed as a chusa or secretary in the Korean Foreign Office (1883-1885).

Upon his return, Yun became associated with a group of liberal aristocrats whose mission was to bring Korea into closer contact with the rest of the world. The establishment of a postal department was their first goal. During a banquet held to celebrate the meeting of this goal, a group of assassins descended on the banquet and Yun escaped to the American embassy. Foote arranged for Yun to be smuggled aboard an American ship bound for Shanghai (1885).

In Shanghai, Yun enrolled at the Anglo-Chinese College, a Methodist Episcopal Church institution, operated by Dr. Young John Allen (1885). While here Yun converted to Christianity and was baptized into the Methodist Episcopal Church (April 3, 1887).

Allen made arrangements for Yun to become a theology student at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee (1888-1891). He then transferred to Emory College in Oxford, Georgia (1891-1893). During the summers, while at Emory, Yun visited rural churches to help raise money to support his educational endeavors. Yun was able to save $200 above his needs that was entrusted to Emory's President Warren A. Candler, earmarked for the establishment of a Methodist Church in Korea.

Unable to return to Korea because of the political strife there, he returned to Shanghai as a teacher in the Anglo-Chinese College. While here, he married Mo Tsu-Sung, a Chinese student (1893-1895).

A change in the political situation allowed Yun to finally return to Korea. He was appointed secretary to the Premier and six months later promoted to Vice-Minister of Education. From this position he was named Vice-minister of Foreign Affairs (1895-1896). During this time (1895) Yun helped to establish a Korean mission of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

Yun became involved with the Independence Club, one of the first modern political movements in Korea, and became president and editor of the newsletter The Independent (1896-1898). Because of his political activism, the Korean government sought to remove him from the capital by appointing him as magistrate at Wonsan, and to other posts in Chinnamp'o and Ch'onan (1899-1904). He returned to Seoul and served as Acting Minister of Foreign Affairs (1904-1906).

At this point in his life, Yun decided to abandon his political work and devoted himself to Christian work. Yun established the Anglo-Korean School at Songdo (1906). Yun had always believed that western training in agriculture and manufacturing, coupled with the development of the work ethic, were the ways to help Korea end the cycle of poverty and discontent. The school at Songdo, an industrial school, was established with this goal in mind.

Yun was imprisoned for four years (1911-1915), along with five others, on suspicion of the murder of Japanese Governor-General of Korea, Count Terauchi, due to his underground patriotic activities. Upon his release he continued with his work at Songdo and helped to establish the Korean Y.M.C.A (1915-1925), retiring from active life in 1925. Yun died December 6, 1945. Biographical sources: "Indomitable Baron Yun: An Emory Immortal" by Webb Garrison, Emory University Quarterly, December 1952, and "A Korean at Oxford" by Donald M. Bishop, The Emory Magazine, vol. 52, no. 3, 1976.

Scope and Content Note

The Yun Ch'i-ho papers consists mainly of diaries of Yun Ch'i-ho (1883, 1889-1905; 1916-1935, 1938-1941, and 1943). The diaries document Yun’s activities as a secretary in the Korean Foreign Office (1883-1885), as a student at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee (1888-1891) and Emory College in Oxford, Georgia (1891-1893), and as a teacher in the Anglo-Chinese College in Shanghai (1893-1895). Also included are correspondence, writings by Yun, material pertaining to Yun's appointment in Russia, menus, and a photograph.

The Yun diaries are soft-bound. All are in English, except for the 1883 diary. They contain daily entries about events in his life and reflections on life, religion, and politics.

The correspondence includes letters to and from Warren A. Candler. These letters, dating 1895, 1906-1908, discuss Yun's work in Korea, especially the Songdo School, also known as Kaesong-si, and the Korean political climate including relations with Japan.

Other materials included in this collection are a letter to the editor of the Korea Daily News (18 August 1904) written by Yun, a speech on the Far East delivered at the Chicago Auditorium (May 1910), and a writing by Yun [1904] that discusses Japanese force in Korea; "Outline Programme for School" by Warren Candler (1906?); and materials related to Yun's appointment in Russia (1896, 1899). Two copies of the Korean National Anthem, one in Yun's hand (1945) and the other a presentation copy which includes a portrait of Yun. Miscellaneous menus and a photograph of Yun, Emory alumni, and others taken in Seoul (1926) complete the collection.


Selected Search Terms

Personal Names

Corporate Names

Topical Terms

Geographic Names

Form/Genre Terms

Occupation


Container List

Photocopied Diaries
Box Folder Content
9 1 1883 [in Chinese and Japanese]
9 2 1889 December 7 - 1890 August 4
9 3 1890 August 5 - 1891 July 12
9 4 1891 September 10 - 1892 January 20
9 5 1892 January 25 - May 01
9 6 1892 May 06 - July 26
9 7 1892 July 27 - November 26
9 8 1892 November 27 - 1893 February 15
9 9 1893 February 17 - May 20
10 1 1893 May 22 - July 24
10 2 1893 July 25 - November 01
10 3 1893 November 02 - 1894 March 14
10 4 1894 May 17 - August 25
10 5 1894 August 28 - December 31
10 6 1895 January 01 - March 31
10 7 1895 July 07 - 21 October
10 8 1895 October 24 - 1896 January 21
10 9 1896 January 24 - June 30
10 10 1896 December 23 - 1897 May 27
10 11 1897 May 31 - December 20
11 1 1897 December 24 - 1898 November 16
11 2 1898 December 27 - 1899 February 12
11 3 1899 March 05 - 1900 December 14
11 4 1900 December 18 - 1901 May 14
11 5 1902 March 31 - November 01
11 6 1902 November 10 - 1903 June 19
11 7 1904 April 06 - August 09
11 8 1904 August 13 - 1905 February 10
11 9 1905 March 10 - July 04
11 10 1905 July 10 - November 10
11 11 1905 November 17, n. d. [loose pages]
11 12 1905 November 13 - 1906 July 03
12 1 1916
12 2 1917
12 3 1918
12 4 1919
12 5 1920
13 1 1921
13 2 1922
13 3 1923
13 4 1924
13 5 1925
14 1 1926
14 2 1927
14 3 1928
14 4 1929
14 5 1930
14 6 1931
15 1 1932
15 2 1933
15 3 1934
15 4 1935
15 5 1938
15 6 1939
16 1 1940
16 2 1941
16 3 1943
Other Material
17 1 Appointment in Russia, 1896, 1899 (8 items)
17 2 Commemoration of Yun Ch'i-ho, 1995 (4 items and 2 photographs)
17 3 Correspondence, 1895-1918 (41 items)
17 4 Menus, 1895-1896 (3 items)
17 5 Photograph, Yun Ch'i-ho, Emory alumni, and others: Seoul, 1926
17 6 Printed material, Outline Programme for School [Songdo School] by Warren A. Candler, no date [1906?] (1 item)
17 7 Speech, Yun Ch'i-ho, Chicago Auditorium, May 1910
17 8 Writing by Tun Ch'i-ho, [In response to Japanese force in Korea, 1904]
Korean National Anthem
OP1 Original autograph manuscript, 1945 [RESTRICTED]
18 1 Original autograph manuscript, 1945, photocopy [RESTRICTION: no reproduction allowed]
18 2 Presentation scroll of anthem with portrait of Yun Ch'i-ho [RESTRICTION: no reproduction allowed]
18 3 Printed reproductions of anthem with portrait of Yun Ch'i-ho [2] [RESTRICTION: no reproduction allowed]
18 4 T-shirt with Korean National Anthem
Scrapbook
19 1 Scrapbook kept by Yun Chi'-ho's daughter, ca.1934-1975
Pocket watch
20 - Pocket watch presented to Yun Ch'i-ho by the Empress of Japan as a gift in return for his services as a translator, spring 1884 [watch case includes note in Yun Ch'i-ho's hand describing the gift]
21 - Pocket watch likely purchased by Yun Ch'i-ho in Oxford, Georgia, circa 1892-1894 and which he wore regularly thorughout his life
v1.11.0-dev